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Steep Decline in Customer Satisfaction Continues in Fourth Quarter, ACSI Data Show

first_img Steep Decline in Customer Satisfaction Continues in Fourth Quarter, ACSI Data Show WhatsApp WhatsApp By Digital AIM Web Support – February 17, 2021 Pinterest Previous articleCosmic Wings Debuts with Out-of-this-World Cheetos® Menu of Wings, Cheese Bites & MoreNext articleMore than 15.5 Million Affluent Households across the Globe are in the Market for Residential Real Estate over Next Three Years, According to a Study by Luxury Portfolio International (LPI) Digital AIM Web Support Twitter Pinterestcenter_img TAGS  Facebook The American Customer Satisfaction Index stands at a 73.7 (out of 100) after a 0.9% drop in Q4 2020. Twitter Local NewsBusiness Facebooklast_img read more

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Feature: The “Mile” High Club

first_imgThe Oxford RevueOxford’s comic troupe is gracing the Mile again, and with a new show “X” which incorporates the best of their shows this year, along with some new material. With such a talented cast, laughs are expected – but it will be interesting to see if they’ve developed any new material after the mixed reviews in response to their recent collaborative effort with the Footlights and those failed glory hunters the ‘Durham Revue’ (‘Doxbridge’: what a joke…). Consistency expected. I’m a Lab Rat, Get Me Out Of Here! Oxford’s in house playwright Tom Campion pulls another one out of the bag: this time focusing on the world’s first televised drug trial in which five subjects have signed their life over to experimentation. It’s a fairly tongue in cheek look at reality TV, thankfully not taking itself too seriously. An extremely strong cast with some very familiar names involved. Highly Recommended. t’s that time of the year again. Thesps all over Oxford are frantically scouring the OUDS website in search of a ‘free’ ticket to the Fringe: a whole array of shows are heading north in search of the coveted ‘out of Oxford’ fame which may or may not land them with an agent and a fat wad of cash. The stage calls, darling: the boards of the Underbelly and C-Venues lure the darkly pseudo-arty side out of every student that even thought about doing a GCSE in graphic design; the glow paint and skinny jeans are donned in an attempt to ‘scene’ themselves up in time for all those hours they’ll be spending flyering the ‘Mile’. Summer’s here and with it come rushing all the ideas you couldn’t get away with during term time: forget Faustus, screw Shakespeare – let’s get experimental, baby. Here’s a look at what the ivory towers and dreaming spires will be sending the ‘Burgh this August. Raz-Mataz “Raz-Mataz. Post-punk posturing, rock’n’roll swaggering, ice caps melting and a celebration of all the living left to be done. The Ruskin School of Art and Oxford’s Experimental Theatre Company invite you to throw yourself off that velour lounger and into the shiznit”. Explanation: electro DJs, dancing, art and a huge, glow-paint-coloured culture clash. Still confused? Go and find out for yourself: I will. MonstersRipping apart American sheen culture from the inside out, this darkly comic/comically dark piece of new writing will force the audience to seek answers to probing questions such as the nature of reality and whether Father Christmas really exists. An exciting play with a hugely talented cast, this is once not to be missed. The Oxford ImpsWhat needs to be said? It’ll be great fun: we’ve seen it before, we’ll go again and again. The Fringe won’t know what’s hit them. Go for a (sort of) night off the weirdness. Robin Hood and the Golden ArrowJoin Robin and his merry men and help Sherwood’s legendary outlaw outwit the wiles of the putrid Sherriff of Nottingham and his devious cousin Guy of Gisbourne to win the archery tournament and the heart of his fair lady Marion. The usual Robin Hood shenigans, except the audience has the opportunity to pelt the lead role with rotten eggs. Fun for all the family, then. Go for some light relief from some of the rather more strange things which will be going on. Xenu is Loose:Xenu has escaped his eternal prison and is out to destroy the Earth! Only two young Scientologists can stop him, but will they be able to learn enough to defeat his super-advanced alien powers? “A laser-toting, totally brand-new rock musical based on the beliefs of The Church of Scientology. Alien invasion, human purity and a potential legal-battle-waiting-to-happen combine to deliver a spectacle of galactic proportions!”Tom Richards and Stewart Pringle’s latest piece should be as much of a success as last year’s ‘Top Gun: The Musical’, which sold out within seconds (almost). Don’t miss it: the future of mankind depends on it. Play On WordsHaving won awards in both Oxford and London, Tom Crawshaw’s ‘Play On Words’ goes up to Edinburgh and is sure to cause a stir with some of the critics. Described as a ‘tragi-comedy of quick witted punning and theatrical high-jinx’, it will be interesting to see how the play has developed since it’s run post-NWF. Certainly worth a visit.last_img read more

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News story: Trade Remedies Authority on track to protect UK industry

first_img We are committed to ensuring that UK industry continues to have the protection it needs against injury caused by unfair trading practices, or unforeseen surges in imports, once we have left the EU. That is why the Department have developed an independent trade remedies framework and I am looking forward to leading the TRA, to deliver this. The TRA will form a key part of the UK’s new independent trade policy, as we prepare to take control of our own trade agenda for the first time in more than 40 years.The new authority will be based in Reading and will be responsible for investigating cases of unfair trading practices and unforeseen surges in imports that injure UK businesses. It will be able to recommend new measures for the protection of domestic industries. The UK’s new independent trade remedies system will protect UK businesses from injury caused by unfair trading practices, such as dumping and subsidies, and unforeseen surges in imports, when we leave the European Union.Claire Bassett, Trade Remedies Authority (TRA) Chief Executive Designate, updated the International Trade Committee today on the progress that has been made to ensure the TRA will be ready for 29 March 2019.DIT has already recruited 70% of the future TRA’s staff, with 90 staff now appointed.Over one-third of those in post have now completed the comprehensive technical training programme and are armed with the relevant accounting, legal and economic skills required to conduct trade remedies investigations.The UK system will be compliant with World Trade Organisation rules, including for the conduct of investigations and provisions on the calculations of dumping and injury. There will be a statutory appeals system for trade remedies decisions.The TRA will launch a new website, which will allow people to submit applications and evidence as part of the review and investigations process. The new platform has undergone several rounds of user and development testing and will be ready to be launched by the time the UK leaves the EU.TRA Chief Executive, Claire Bassett said:last_img read more

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Phish Shares Pro-Shot Video Of Other-Worldly “Set Your Soul Free” Jam From Mexico [Watch]

first_imgThis past weekend, Phish headed to Riviera Maya, Mexico for the third edition of their Mexican destination event. This year’s Mexico trip has been widely hailed by fans as the best of the band’s three Mexico runs, with rare bust-outs, long-lost covers, and plenty of improv popping up throughout the three-show engagement. Following their triumphant trip south of the border, the band has shared pro-shot video of the monster “Set Your Soul Free” that opened the second set of their second of three shows on Friday.For the second night in a row, a newer-vintage “Soul” song took the set two opener slot. “Set Your Soul Free” has quickly cemented its standing as a reliable jam vehicle, and this version was no different. The band pushed into a number of distinct spaces throughout the jam, from “No Quarter”-like organ tremors to sinister wails from Trey. A “Piper”-like motif began to appear around the jam’s 17-minute mark as Trey dialed in some soaring sustain. Things patiently built from there toward a stop-start segment featuring some obligatory “woos” from the crowd. “Set Your Soul Free” continued with watery Baker’s Dozen-style ambiance before Anastasio drove the 26+ minute exploration home with a towering guitar peak.You can watch a pro-shot video of Phish’s Mexican “Set Your Soul Free” below:Phish – “Set Your Soul Free” [Pro-Shot][Video: Phish]Phish will now take the next few months off as the band members head out to perform with various side projects including a number of Trey Anastasio Band dates, the first-ever performances by Trey Anastasio and Jon Fishman‘s new Ghosts of the Forest project, and a number of March shows by Mike Gordon‘s solo outfit. All four members of Phish will reunite in June to commence their 2019 summer tour.For a full list of upcoming dates, head here.Setlist: Phish | Barceló Maya Beach | Riviera Maya, Mexico | 2/23/19 SET 1: You Enjoy Myself, Turtle in the Clouds, 46 Days, No Men In No Man’s Land > Emotional Rescue, Tube > Shade, Saw It AgainSET 2: Set Your Soul Free > Mercury > Slave to the Traffic Light > Possum > Sanity > Walk AwayENCORE: Morelast_img read more

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Q&A with Steven E. Hyman

first_imgPresident Drew Faust recently announced the creation of a University-wide task force to recommend how the University can better prevent sexual misconduct involving students. The task force will include students, faculty, and staff from across Harvard University and will consult widely within the Harvard community and beyond.Former Harvard Provost Steven E. Hyman, Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology and director of the Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research at the Broad Institute, will lead the committee. As a physician and scientist, and former director of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), Hyman has deep experience in public health issues including prevention strategies. As provost, he founded in 2002 Harvard’s Office of Sexual Assault Prevention & Response (OSAPR), which works to prevent sexual violence through trainings and education and also provides confidential support for student survivors.The Harvard Gazette recently sat down with Hyman to discuss the goals of the task force and the challenges associated with addressing sexual assault on college and university campuses.GAZETTE: Why do you feel there was a need to create this task force now?HYMAN: I see two critical factors. First, more than a decade ago when I was provost, we created a first round of reforms aimed at responding to sexual assault with a focus on supporting those who have experienced sexual assault. While those reforms, establishing the Office of Sexual Assault Prevention & Response as well as recommending new training modules, improved the climate on the campus, it’s crystal clear that they did not go nearly far enough. The recent, moving Crimson editorial, which I read just as we were about to launch this committee, underscores this point to me. There is a great deal more that we must do.Second are policy changes related to Title IX concerning sexual assault and recently announced by the federal government. Harvard will, of course, meet these legal standards. It is critical, however, that we not limit our response to legal standards alone. Specifically, we must take seriously the challenge of prevention, and we must make sure that we provide appropriate support to students who have experienced violence and related forms of sexual misconduct.This committee is not charged with examining procedures for investigation of complaints, adjudication, or punishment. Those difficult issues must be dealt with thoughtfully and well. Our mandate comes from the recognition that even if our administrative procedures can achieve the most just of outcomes in each case, lives may have already been terribly damaged. We simply have to find better ways to prevent these terrible incidents, and when they occur, also to effectively support students who have experienced sexual assault to maximize their ability to benefit from their educational and extracurricular experiences here.GAZETTE: Can you briefly summarize the charge of the task force?HYMAN: The first charge of the task force is both simple and difficult. The core of the charge is to find effective ways to prevent sexual assault and related behaviors. To do this we must access a fairly complete set of data about sexual assault at Harvard, including information known to students but not found in any compendium of statistics. Also critical to the long-term success of this committee and ultimately the University is to recommend ways of evaluating new programs for their effectiveness. A commitment to serious evaluation is extremely important because there is no set of simple recipes for what will be most effective in the Harvard context — or any context.In accepting this role, I was heartened by President Faust’s desire that we look broadly for effective interventions. It is, of course, critical that all members of the community understand the rules, understand their responsibilities to others, and are aware of the resources available to address sexual assault and misconduct. From my prior experiences as NIMH director, however, where I was concerned with a wide range of preventive interventions, I recognize that education and training, while critical, are not enough by themselves, even if they are appropriately repeated at intervals. We will have to understand the factors that increase the incidence of sexual violence, including, but not limited to, alcohol, and consider ways of mitigating those factors. We must not conflate alcohol use with sexual assault, but we must not fail to address it.GAZETTE: What questions will you seek to answer?HYMAN: We are really going to try to understand the scope of the problem, the circumstances under which sexual assault and other sexual misconduct are most likely to occur — which may be different in the College and the graduate and professional Schools — and the contributing factors. We are going to have an excellent and diverse committee, including students. I believe that we will have several creative social scientists who will help us interpret that data and develop recommendations for prevention and evaluation. We should leave no stone unturned.Clearly we have to work very closely with the Schools, many of which have been working assiduously on these issues. We want to be able to benefit from their work done, and to create synergies rather than duplications or conflicts.GAZETTE: Is it important to have students as members of the task force?HYMAN: Students are absolutely necessary. Students will be critical participants because it is fundamentally their experiences that we need to address. Their insight into how current systems of prevention and support have worked and how they have failed will be of central importance to our work. The faculty members on the committee will have expertise in thinking about data collection and analysis, education, preventive intervention, and support, but students will give us a more direct view of what’s actually happening and will help ensure that our recommendations are sensitive to the multitude of cultural issues and thus likely to take root. Another crucial role for students on the committee will be as conduits to peers not on the committee, who will also have important things to say.GAZETTE: You mention consulting with other Schools. Will the task force be reaching out to anyone else from the Harvard community for input?HYMAN: We have to find ways of hearing from many voices, both inside Harvard at all of our Schools, and outside Harvard as well. We have to look for what has worked best and what has looked promising but failed.GAZETTE: The University has been working on new policies and processes regarding sexual assault. How does the task force’s work relate to that effort?HYMAN: Our role isn’t to second guess the policies that are being developed, but I am sure that if through our research and data analysis we discover something that would suggest a change in policy, we would have the opportunity to convey such data to the appropriate people at Harvard.GAZETTE: Can you tell me what the next steps are?HYMAN: The committee roster will be finalized. I want to have some substantial meetings before the summer to organize our work and to commission some research, and to work out a process that will allow us to take testimony in the autumn.GAZETTE: Any other thoughts on the work ahead?HYMAN: Sexual assault and sexual misconduct are extremely damaging both to individuals and to the broader Harvard community. We need to understand these issues better than we have so far. We must then be committed to finding effective approaches to prevention that can be embraced and implemented by this community.  I am very much aware that there is no magic bullet, and that not everything that we recommend will prove effective. Thus we must not be satisfied simply by issuing a persuasive report, but must be relentless in trying to get this matter right in the present, and to encourage the University to make the long-term commitment that will be required well beyond the life of this committee.last_img read more

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Blocking fear

first_imgSince the campus was cleared in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, Adeleye is back home in Memphis, though not removed from Alzheimer’s research or even patients. She can still analyze data from afar. And her best friend from childhood, whose grandmother was starting to show signs of dementia, asked the neuroscience major for advice. “You’re never prepared,” Adeleye said. But, “It’s not just you going through that experience but all those around you.”On the Harvard volleyball team, Adeleye played middle blocker. The player in that position — center court, closest to the net — is typically loud and enthusiastic, the team trumpeter. “I’m naturally a really loud person,” Adeleye said, “so it fit well with my personality.” When she returned to the court in September 2019 after almost a year of recovery, the 6-foot-1-inch senior achieved career highs of 14 kills and seven blocks against Sacred Heart.Asked if juggling athletics, science, and a brain injury ever felt overwhelming, Adeleye said, “Anything you’re going to do is going to be challenging. Anything worth doing is going to have some obstacles.”Adeleye is looking for a job as a neurology clinic researcher and will apply to medical school in two years. This is one in a series of profiles showcasing some of Harvard’s stellar graduates.Sope Adeleye went up for a block and everything went black.“I just got hit in the face,” she said, describing that fateful moment during volleyball practice in October 2018.Adeleye had performed that jump thousands of times before, but this time her head got there faster than her hands.She was diagnosed with a severe concussion. The neuroscience major knew better than most that head traumas come with a shadowy threat — an increased risk of dementia.“So much of where I’ve gone in life is based on what I’ve been able to do with my brain,” she said. “That’s so much of who I am, and the idea of losing that, slowly but surely, that sense of self, the sense of who you are …”Growing up in Memphis, a younger sister to two athletic brothers and the daughter of two medical professionals — her father is a nephrologist and her mother a nurse practitioner — Adeleye knew she wanted to be both an athlete and a doctor. In addition to volleyball, she played basketball, soccer, and tennis.Around the same time, Adeleye said, she fell in love with the brain — a sheep’s brain to be exact. The summer before her junior year in high school, she enrolled in a neuropsychology course at Columbia University. There, she dissected a sheep brain and got her first look at how it controls an animal’s behaviors, learning ability, and sensation.“You have this thing in your head that literally controls everything,” Adeleye said. “We know so much about it, but we also know just so little.”,Adeleye decided to study neuroscience before she enrolled at Harvard, but she didn’t choose a research track until after her concussion. In spring of 2019, she joined Tracy Young-Pearse’s lab at Brigham and Women’s Hospital where she studies the neuronal characteristics that differentiate healthy individuals from those with late onset Alzheimer’s disease.“With studying human disease and the brain,” she said, “you can’t go two steps without hearing about Alzheimer’s disease. It’s estimated that 40 million people have Alzheimer’s disease right now worldwide and the number is only going to increase exponentially by 2050 because of the aging population.”In 2018, Adeleye started volunteering with the nationwide program Alzheimer’s Buddies (the Phillips Brooks House Association runs Harvard’s chapter). Almost every Sunday, she and the other volunteers visited a nursing home to spend an hour chatting with a “Buddy,” a patient living with a form for dementia. Though some patients have family members and friends nearby who come to visit, some live in relative isolation, which can aggravate their disease. Adeleye said the program taught her how much it means for someone to just be there. “You have this thing in your head that literally controls everything. We know so much about it, but we also know just so little.” — Sope Adeleye ’20last_img read more

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How We Can Use Technology to Transform the Classroom

first_imgWith each fundamental shift in America’s economy, our public education system has also transformed to meet the needs of both student and industry. When we were a primarily agrarian nation, schools focused on the liberal arts and operated on a schedule that coincided with the cycle of planting and harvest. Following the Industrial Revolution, schools adopted a more regimented model focused on rote and routine, and added a more specialized curriculum designed to meet the insatiable labor needs of our mills and factories.Today we are well into the Information Age, where we need students knowledgeable in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) in order to satisfy employment demands for a wide range of industries. Yet our students are being instructed on a 20th Century standard and, as a result, are graduating without the STEM skills needed for today’s jobs and unable to excel in a digital environment. That’s unfortunate, because never before have we had so many innovative tools and methodologies that can make learning easier.Rather than confine our students within the staid walls of academia that the Harvard Business Review says are disconnected from how the world works today, it’s time to knock those walls down and engage students by bringing the promise of technology to bear in our schools. It’s time to flip the classroom and change dynamics that engender educational ennui in our children before they disengage.The concept of a flipped classroom was first explored by Harvard’s Eric Mazur in the 1990s as a response to his experience teaching an introductory physics course, but it has come a long way since.The notion of using the flipped classroom to help guide students to greater understanding by connecting them to true subject matter expert resources is the approach behind the Khan Academy, whose founder, Sal Khan, started by recording simple but engaging math lessons for a young cousin, and posting the videos on YouTube. The videos not only helped his cousin, but soon tens of thousands of people were viewing and gaining the benefit. The popularity (and efficacy) of Khan’s approach was not lost on the education-minded Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, which has funded the Academy and its ongoing innovations.As Khan demonstrated, the flipped classroom is especially important in STEM education, where teachers can leverage technology to deliver coursework to many more students, use real-time analytics tools to help recognize when and how to intervene with students who need it, and encourage others by guiding them toward resources that they can engage outside the classroom. This approach gives students the ability to use in-class time to apply their newfound information and to complete assignments. Addressing STEM education in this way helps to keep students engaged, developing vital skills in those who might otherwise lose interest and find themselves unprepared when they move on to college.Taking the flipped classroom farther by more fully leveraging learning technologies could make a big difference in addressing some of our schools’ biggest challenges, such as establishing a solid STEM foundation at the elementary level that can later feed our high schools and colleges. This need is especially acute in poor and minority communities, where attracting the best and brightest teachers and having sufficient resources to nurture all students is at crisis levels.Transforming public education would be a major undertaking, but the means are well within our grasp, and many other innovative programs at all levels of education are employing technology in new and exciting ways. In California, KIPP charter schools are flipping K-4 classrooms with dramatic results, using the approach to raise kindergarten reading comprehension scores from 36 to 96 percent. Even the Department of Defense is getting in the game with a mobile application that helps young children gain a stronger appreciation for science by guiding them to resources and answers, and debunking common misconceptions that stymie interest and progress in STEM.These methods more closely resemble today’s business environment, where technology is used to bring virtual resources to bear, fostering a collaborative, highly mobile workforce that draws on an abundance of available information to learn, make decisions and create value. Workers are no longer tethered to a cubicle; with mobile devices and analytical tools, they can be productive from just about anywhere. The careers of tomorrow (such as data scientist, identified by the Harvard Business Review as the “sexiest job of the 21st Century”) demand it.The good news is that, just as businesses are transforming their processes by investing in technologies such as cloud computing and big data analytics to lower operating costs, increase quality, make better decisions, and boost productivity, schools can do the same. Cloud computing can serve as the basis for a fully integrated educational platform that gives students, teachers, parents, and administrators an easier way to participate, administrate, evaluate and educate.That was the conclusion of the Education Data Systems working group of the non-partisan Digital Promise initiative, which recommended the adoption of “data-enhanced teaching and learning environments through the creation of data collection, access, and interpretation tools and systems that connect and foster virtual teaching and learning communities.”Public schools are already spending nearly $10 billion per year on their IT systems; it makes sense to invest that money in ways that can increase teaching efficacy while lowering operating costs. Even in a challenging economy, businesses are investing in transformative technologies and innovative business models because they must in order to remain competitive. If America is to remain the leading force of innovation, it must apply that same logic to public education.This post orginally appeared on Forbes.com on November 27, 2012.last_img read more

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Feds: Woman charged in ex-con’s plot against college women

first_imgNEW YORK (AP) — A New York woman has been charged with conspiring with an ex-convict to extort and force into labor or prostitution some women he met after living in his daughter’s on-campus housing at Sarah Lawrence College. Isabella Pollok was freed Friday on $100,000 bail after an indictment was unsealed in Manhattan federal court. Her lawyer did not immediately respond to a request for comment. She was charged with conspiring with Lawrence Ray. The 61-year-old man has been held without bail since his arrest last year. He has pleaded not guilty. Authorities say he committed his crimes after moving in with his daughter, Pollok and other women in 2010 at Sarah Lawrence.last_img read more

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The Latest: Wet snow turns to sleet in northern New England

first_imgIn its second day in the Northeast, a snow storm left nearly 15 inches of snow piled up in parts of New Hampshire. The snow changed over to sleet in areas of Maine and New Hampshire, adding to the misery of removal. Snow is expected to continue in Vermont and Maine until Wednesday morning. Skiers rejoiced as heavy snow fell in the region’s mountains. Off the Maine coast, the storm whipped up waves that approached 30 feet, and a 73-mph gust was recorded at an offshore buoy.last_img

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Run to raise alcohol awareness

first_imgThe residents of Lyons Hall will honor a former Lyonite killed by a drunk driver with its signature event, the Mara Fox Run, on Saturday morning. Lyons Hall president Vivien Devaney said the dorm established the event to educate students about the consequences of driving while drunk. “The run was established as a memorial for Mara, who was killed by a drunk driver during her freshman year [in 1993],” Devaney said. “It’s the culmination of the week when we educate girls about alcohol use and drunk driving.” The 5-k event also raises funds for a scholarship in Fox’s name. “The proceeds go to the Mara Fox Scholarship fund that goes toward any Lyonite who wishes to study in Toledo, Spain, because Mara wanted to study there,” Devaney said. Lyons residents also sold purple hair feathers in the dining halls and LaFortune Student Center this week to benefit the scholarship fund. Sophomore Rebecca Rossi said the run connects current Lyons residents with Fox’s legacy. “The Mara Fox Run is about keeping her spirit alive,” Rossi said. “I feel like I know Mara even though I never met her.” Fox’s parents will have dinner with Lyons residents Friday evening, Rossie said. Freshman Allison McKown purchased a hair feather Wednesday. “I want to participate because it’s a good cause,” McKown said. “I want to raise awareness about drunk driving.” As part of the Mara Fox Week events, Lyons hosted a PILLARS gathering about “Women and Alcohol” on Wednesday night. Freshman Antoinette Chan, who attended the event, said the entire week encourages students to think about all types of wellness. “The run promotes both physical and mental well-being,” Chan said. Freshman Alexa Vega said she was excited to participate in the run Saturday morning. “It’s my first 5-k at Notre Dame, and I get to help a good cause at the same time,” Vega said. Devaney said the race would also feature music and free giveaways for participants. “The music’s supposed to be really good this year, and we have a lot of people participating,” Devaney said. “We encourage people to come out. The race is at 10 a.m. on Saturday, and the registration is at 9 a.m. outside of Lyons. If you participate, you will get a bib for a buy-one, get-one free entrée at Chipotle.” Registration tables for the race are located at both dining halls and in LaFortune Student Center. Runners can also register Saturday morning. “Through the event planned by Lyons Hall and her parents, Mara’s memory lives on,” Devaney said. “Hopefully the weather holds out this year, so that it can be a good event.”last_img read more

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