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‘Companioning’ on both sides of the grave

first_img‘Companioning’ on both sides of the grave Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Jobs & Calls November 1, 2012 at 5:10 pm I am overjoyed to read this beautiful story of witness to our homeless brothers and sisters. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA [Episcopal News Service] Brother Ron Fender will spend Nov. 1 and Nov. 2, All Saints and All Souls Days, commemorating Chattanooga’s homeless and unclaimed dead, first by decorating their graves with fall flowers and, a day later, with dinner and Eucharist.While Episcopal Church commemoration of the dead is a longstanding tradition, Fender’s is among a growing number of outreach ministries that “companion” the poor, the homeless, the marginalized and alone, on both sides of the grave.As outreach case manager for the Chattanooga Community Kitchen, Fender, a monk in the Episcopal Brotherhood of St. Gregory, offers a range of services to the homeless, including keeping vigil with the dying and also burying them.The ministry emerged “soon after I came here,” he recalled during a recent telephone interview from his office. “One of the homeless men collapsed here at the kitchen and stopped breathing. We did CPR, got him to the hospital and they ventilated him. But after some hours the doctors came and asked me if he had family.“I knew he didn’t because he told me many times that he was alone in the world and he was concerned there’d be no one to bury him,” Fender recalled. “The doctor said, ‘we really need to let him go’. They started disconnecting everything. I stayed with him till it was over.With that death he realized that “I didn’t want any of them to die alone and, even if they died alone, I did not want them to go unburied without some recognition of who they were and the fact that I’ve loved them and that God has accepted them into his arms.”That was 10 years ago. His ministry has evolved so that the coroner’s office notifies him when a body is unclaimed. The county donates a grave; local funeral homes provide their services and a cardboard casket.He eulogizes the dead “and I try to personalize it,” Fender said. “I do always assure those who are gathered there that that person is no longer homeless. That person is at home. We are the homeless ones, but that that person is no longer homeless.”On any given night, Fender believes “there are between 300 and 500 people sleeping outside,” he said. “Chattanooga has one emergency or drop-in shelter, and it has 42 beds for men and 12 for women, so a large number of our people are sleeping outside.”Sacred ‘vigiling’ in Los AngelesIn Los Angeles, a three-fold collaboration of the Rev. Sarah Nichols, Chapman University professor Don Gabard, and Dr. Pamelyn Close, has trained almost 100 volunteers for By Your Side, a program designed “to meet people where they are by serving as compassionate companions to those who are dying.”Nichols, director of pastoral care for the diocesan Episcopal Communities and Services, said the volunteers offer “the gift of authentic presence” to those in local hospitals, homes, long-term care facilities, their own parishes and communities of influence.“Research shows that companionship and spiritual support are two of the most important desires at the end of life, yet many Americans die alone,” Nichols said in an e-mail to the Episcopal News Service.“When facing the vulnerability of end of life, every human being deserves to have their sacredness affirmed and their spirituality honored through the compassionate presence of another person, in whatever way is meaningful to them,” she added.It is not proselytizing or even about prayer, says Don Gabard, a physical therapist and parishioner at All Saints Church in Pasadena, whose mother’s death and volunteerism helped inspire By Your Side.Six years ago his mother was dying of ovarian cancer in North Carolina and “she made it pretty clear to me that she wanted me to be there,” he recalled during a recent telephone interview with ENS. “I was both filled with sorrow at her death but at the same time so grateful that I could be there.”He also volunteered at the L.A. County-University of Southern California medical center where at least seven percent of the patients are homeless and never have a visitor.What many people really want “is to tell their story,” he said. “They may tell it to you many times but it changes because they’re making meaning of life.”So “there is no formula to this. People have their own unique way of making meaning or finding meaning in their faith, if they have a faith.”Gabard remembered visiting a seven-week-old child. “Her family abandoned her when they found she had a catastrophic illness that was going to take her life,” he recalled.“They couldn’t stand to be there. What we did as volunteers was hold her and sing to her and comfort her like you do with any child. If there are any rights that are inalienable, to be held and loved as a child is certainly one of those.”The volunteers visit those who “are ‘underfamilied,’ have no family, or are young, or in their 80s. It’s just across the board. I can’t predict who or what I’m going to see when I go there.”For two-year By Your Side volunteer Sharon Crandall, a parishioner at the Church of Our Saviour in San Gabriel, California, visiting the dying “has been far more rewarding and transformative than I ever imagined.“I have learned that the best approach is to not have any expectations. Learning to meet people where they are in the dying process has helped me in my relationship to others and in my relationship with God,” she said.“It also gave me the courage and compassion to care for my aunt in her last weeks and my mother-in-law in her last months. Both had the desire to die at home. I was so grateful to be able to share this time with both of them. It is a gift you really have to experience. There are no words to describe the grace of dying.”Hope and angels in DetroitAt 4 p.m. nearly every third Wednesday of each month Carolyn Gamble, senior warden at St. Christopher’s-St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Detroit gathers, along with her 13-year-old granddaughter Kaitlyn and others, at the Perry Funeral Home.They light a candle, read the names of the city’s unclaimed dead, pray and sing.Like Gabard in Los Angeles, Gamble’s involvement grew out of personal experience. Her mother had lived in both New York and in Detroit and “when she died we had services in both places for her,” Gamble said during an Oct. 29 telephone interview.When another parishioner told her of the city’s unclaimed dead in the morgue, “their bodies disposed of with no service, no nothing, it really hit home to me,” she said. “It was strange to me, I felt somebody needed to do something.”The funeral home provides the space and the names of the unclaimed. The church has offered nondenominational services since 2008, according to the Rev. Deborah-Semon Scott, St. Christopher’s-St. Paul’s rector. In that time “I’ve lost count of how many folks we’ve had services for,” she said. “It’s in the thousands.”She has officiated at burials for babies and centenarians alike. There are usually no ashes or bodies present. Instead, a candle is lit and there is a single long-stemmed white rose bearing a tag with name and date of birth and death, if known, for each individual being commemorated. At various services, there have been as few as 30 candles and roses or as many as 60, she said.“They might have been in a nursing home; sometimes we have services for babies who were miscarried or died at birth or were stillborn,” according to Semon-Scott. “And we also have had services for folk for whom remains were found and they have a date of death as to when they were found. All they can do is say they were male or female and sometimes it’s pretty sketchy. It sounds grisly, but it’s a fact of life.”The ministry began after a former parishioner heard a radio broadcast that Detroit and other major cities were facing backlogs of unclaimed bodies. “He thought how sad it was that one would come into this life and be a part of this kingdom for whatever length of time and be parted as if they had never been, and wasn’t there something that we could do about that,” she said.After the prayers, there are hymns, “something that everyone knows, like ‘Bind us together, Lord,’” she said.“These are human beings created in the image of the creator and all life is sacred for whatever length of time we are given – the good, the bad and the ugly. It needs to celebrated, acknowledged and thanked because they did walk the earth,” she said. “To pass into the night as if you never had been is exceedingly sad.”Although the ministry “has deeply touched the lives of people who have been a part of it” volunteers are few, perhaps because it is misunderstood.“We thought we’d do this once or twice a year,” Gamble recalled. “We just knew it would catch on and others would want to do it also. But, it didn’t. We’ve had no takers.”Semon-Scott agreed. “When I claim this as one of our outreach ministries, as a mission of the church, usually the response from other clergy is ‘oh, that has to be terrible to go and do that.’”Paradoxically, it is anything but, Semon-Scott said. “How could something one would assume is grim have a joyful peace to it? Yet, it does,” she said. “You can walk away and know that it was a good and right thing to do.”Back in Chattanooga, Fender said he buried 26 people last year. “This year so far, it’s only 12, thank God.”The ministry is important “because the connection between us and those who have died remains very strong,” he said. “I think that we are connected eternally through God and when I visit the cemetery and those graves I know that person is standing there with me. Death may end an earthly life but it does not end a being.“We are spiritual beings with an earthly human experience and our connection with them is very strong. I think that as we remember them we know they are looking back on us with love and thanksgiving. I always tell my homeless friends when I visit their grave I will see you again some day.”–The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service. She is based in Los Angeles. Press Release Service In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Martinsville, VA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Shreveport, LA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector Columbus, GA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Comments are closed. Norris Battin says: Comments (2) Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN center_img Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Tampa, FL Rector Bath, NC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit an Event Listing Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Curate Diocese of Nebraska Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Smithfield, NC By Pat McCaughanPosted Nov 1, 2012 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Events martha knight says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Belleville, IL November 1, 2012 at 10:44 am Wonderful story, Pat. It’s just in time for our “Praying Our Goodbyes” service on Sunday at St. Mikes.Thanks,Norris An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME last_img read more

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New Policy and Campaigns Director at Institute of Fundraising

first_img  18 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 2 December 2005 | News New Policy and Campaigns Director at Institute of Fundraising About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. The Institute of Fundraising has appointed Megan Pacey as Director of Policy & Campaigns. This is a new post created after it was announced that Andrew Watt, Head of Policy & Standards, will be leaving the Institute later this month to relocate to the USA.Megan will be responsible for leading the Institute in its policy and campaigning work, lobbying Government and other trade bodies to support and enhance the fundraising environment.Megan joins the Institute from the young homeless people’s charity Alone in London where she was Policy and Development Manager. Advertisementcenter_img The new post indicates the Institute plans to increase its campaigning activities. As Lindsay Boswell, Chief Executive of the Institute of Fundraising, explains: “With self-regulation and the Charities Bill both on their way, this is a big period of growth for fundraising. We are facing new challenges and there is a need for the Institute to adopt a more proactive campaigning stance.”After eight years Andrew Watt, Head of Policy & Standards, will be leaving the Institute later this month to join the Association of Fundraising Professionals in the USA as Vice President International Programs in January 2006. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Tagged with: Recruitment / peoplelast_img read more

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Jewish Philanthropy

first_img About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Jewish Philanthropy Howard Lake | 14 January 2008 | News  39 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThislast_img read more

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HMRC still favours electronic payments, not cheques, for Gift Aid repayments

first_img  44 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis2 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis2 Although the Payments Council recently decided not to withdraw the use of cheques in 2018 as originally planned, HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC) is reminding charities that it will continue to move to making Gift Aid repayments electronically, rather than by cheque or payable order.HMRC originally made this announcement in April before the Payments Council’s change of direction.HMRC says that it favours payments by BACS because it “will provide greater security for charities and HMRC by protecting against fraudsters”. It will also reduce the organisation’s administrative costs and result in charities receiving repayments from HMRC more quickly.Indeed, if HMRC already holds bank details for a charity or Community Amateur Sports Club (CASC) it will now make any Gift Aid repayments automatically by BACS. Organisations that wish to receive electronic repayments should send their bank account details to HMRC on form ChV1.www.hmrc.gov.uk/charities/ga-repayments.htm About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Tagged with: Finance Gift Aid HMRC HMRC still favours electronic payments, not cheques, for Gift Aid repayments Howard Lake | 18 August 2011 | Newslast_img read more

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Two students joined harassment and discrimination lawsuit against TCU

first_imgSnow temporarily stepping down as honors dean Twitter Twitter Facebook Linkedin Robbie Vaglio TCU wants ex-professor’s discrimination suit dismissed I am the executive editor of TCU 360 from Raleigh, North Carolina. If you walk by my desk in the newsroom you’ll immediately know I’m Post Malone’s biggest fan. I’m always looking for a good story to tell! If you have any story ideas, feel free to reach out! Go Panthers! Linkedin ReddIt Robbie Vagliohttps://www.tcu360.com/author/robbie-vaglio/ The university has until May 20 to respond to both complaints from Jane Doe No. 2 and Jane Doe No. 3.Jane Doe No. 2According to the suit, Jane Doe No. 2 met Schoolmaster in April 2018. She had earned a 4.0 GPA and AddRan’s degree certification director insisted that she meet Schoolmaster, the suit said. One week later, Doe No. 2 was meeting with an AddRan administrative assistant when Schoolmaster walked in and asked for budget data for the Civil Rights Bus Tour to “take it away and give the funds to something else,” according to the lawsuit. While the assistant was gone, Doe No. 2 said Schoolmaster walked over, caressed her bare knee and apologized for interrupting the conversation, the suit said. The lawsuit said Schoolmaster “dehumanized” and “degraded” Doe No. 2 when he touched her lower-inner thigh and to the crease where her legs crossed. The suit said the behavior wasn’t uncommon for Schoolmaster. Although the incident was later confirmed through a Title IX investigation, Doe No. 2’s attorneys were critical of how the investigation was handled. The lawsuit claims that when Doe No. 2 reported the incident to TCU’s Title IX Department a week later, officials there tried to discourage her from filing the complaint by saying her “fears were valid” but retaliation was prohibited. Doe No. 2 didn’t file a complaint until May 1, 2018. The suit said during the two-week interim she could not focus on her classwork while changing her schedule to avoid Schoolmaster. According to the suit, TCU’s Chief Inclusion Officer and Title IX Coordinator Darron Turner, “doubted,” “discredited” and “villainized” Doe No. 2. After not getting a response about her complaint for several weeks, Doe No. 2 met with then-Provost Nowell Donovan and recounted the incident to him. Donovan said he “wouldn’t touch his wife in that manner” and would contact the Title IX office as to why they were “dragging their feet,” according to the lawsuit. After that meeting, Kathy Cavins-Tull, the vice chancellor for student affairs, informed Schoolmaster of Doe’s Title IX complaint, according to the lawsuit. Despite trying her best to stay away from Schoolmaster, he showed up at her graduation celebration in AddRan “to further harass and intimidate Jane Doe No. 2,” according to the lawsuit. The suit said she immediately contacted the Title IX office and spoke with Holland. However, she didn’t report Schoolmaster’s appearance because she said felt violated because her “private” conversation was answered on speaker-phone and Holland was reluctant to make the call private, according to the suit. Doe No. 2 was notified that the Title IX office concluded that her complaint contained enough information to warrant an investigation on June 21, 2018, according to the lawsuit. This is over two months after the incident happened. Schoolmaster admitted he inappropriately touched Doe No. 2, according to the report by the Title IX office, but said it was meant to be “respectful and courteous.” He then said it was unplanned and spontaneous, according to the lawsuit, and called Doe No. 2’s report “frivolous and ridiculous.”The investigation was complete on August 3, 2018. Turner concluded that Schoolmaster inappropriately touched Doe No. 2’s leg and violated TCU’s 1.005 Discrimination, Harassment and Related Conduct Policy. The lawsuit says that Schoolmaster’s punishment was only a one-hour, one-on-one, in-person Title IX training and a one-hour online Title IX training before the beginning of the semester, according to the lawsuit. However, the lawsuit argues that Schoolmaster’s only true sanction was the in-person conversation, since all professors are required to complete the online training. Doe wrote Turner to appeal the sanction, saying her assault was minimized to a “touch” on the leg and Schoolmaster’s lack of punishment. Her appeal was denied. She never received an apology from the university, Turner or Schoolmaster, according to the suit. Jane Doe No. 3Jane Doe No. 3 blames her Type 1 diabetes diagnosis on the discrimination and mistreatment that she has experienced at TCU. The lawsuit says she was subjected to racism, hate and bigotry everywhere she went besides her own dorm room, which she shared with two other minority women.She experienced racism in the classroom where professors facilitated racist conversations and classwork that reinforced white supremacy, according to the lawsuit. Doe No. 3 even experienced racism in a religious group, according to the lawsuit, when a campus minister claimed her dog was racist and did not like people of color in her home. She did not attend any religious events through TCU again after this. During her time as a faculty assistant in the John V. Roach Honors College, Doe No. 3 claims she was forced to do non-academic work late into the night was harassed when she did not respond in a timely manner, according to the lawsuit. Despite her treatment, TCU wanted Doe No. 3 to participate in school activities because she could speak about her experience with a Chancellor’s Scholarship. She claims she is being used as a minority show piece, according to the lawsuit. Doe No. 3 said she had a difficult time managing her diabetes and classwork with the treatment she received on a daily basis, so she reached out to Student Disability Services for help. She has not received any communication from them besides a request for more information on her condition, according to the lawsuit. Doe No. 3 said Turner discouraged her from filing a formal complaint with the Title IX office because it would be a “hassle,” according to the lawsuit. She has yet to receive a response from the university regarding the discrimination she endured at TCU, the suit said. The treatment she has experienced has prevented her from going to class often and turning her homework in on time. She quit her job in the Honors College and has considered leaving TCU. Doe No. 3 also decided she would not be able to attend graduate school anymore because of the stress she’s endured. Dr. Silda NikajDr. Silda Nikaj, who first filed a lawsuit against the university in January claiming she faced racial and gender bias while she taught in the economics department, responded to TCU’s counterclaim that was filed in February.The counterclaim said that Nikaj’s suit lacked evidence that met “federal pleading standards” and that she failed to inform the university that she had accepted a full-time position at the National Institute of Health (NIH), which prevented her from performing her obligations to teach and advise her students.Nikaj denied all allegations in TCU’s counterclaim, including the fact that she failed to teach and advise her students when she accepted her position at NIH and that her constructive termination claim is “frivolous, unreasonable and groundless.” Robbie Vagliohttps://www.tcu360.com/author/robbie-vaglio/ Facebookcenter_img Photo by Heesoo Yang. + posts ReddIt printA 2018 alumna and a senior have joined a lawsuit that accuses the university of fostering a climate of hostility and discrimination against minorities. An amended complaint filed in federal court earlier this month accuses the outgoing Dean of the AddRan College of Liberal Arts Andrew Schoolmaster of groping and touching the alumna weeks before her graduation; the other student blames “discriminatory treatment” at TCU for the onset of Type I diabetes. “As a practice, TCU does not comment on pending litigation beyond the papers we file in court. TCU is focused on creating a respectful and inclusive community for all students,” said Holly Ellman, the associate director of strategic communications management. When asked for comment, Schoolmaster referred inquiries to Ellman.The suit also names Leigh Holland, a Title IX investigator. She also deferred to Ellman. The filing was added to the suit filed on behalf of Jane Doe No. 1 in January. That initial suit accused Dr Diane Snow, then dean of the John V. Roach Honors College, of physical and verbal abuse during a month-long course last summer in Washington, D.C. Dr. Frederick Gooding, who was named in the first suit, has been dropped as a defendant.The alumna was identified as Jane Doe No. 2 and the senior was listed as Jane Doe No. 3 in the lawsuit. Students voice concerns on social media about discrimination at TCU Previous articleHoroscope: April 27, 2020Next articleHow COVID-19 has affected TCU’s School of Music Robbie Vaglio RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history What to watch during quarantine World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution Robbie Vagliohttps://www.tcu360.com/author/robbie-vaglio/ Robbie Vagliohttps://www.tcu360.com/author/robbie-vaglio/ Welcome TCU Class of 2025last_img read more

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Pirate transmission silences sole independent news outlet for three weeks

first_imgNews Radio Erena (Our Eritrea), a Paris-based radio station that broadcasts to Eritrea, one of the world’s most closed countries, and to the Eritrean diaspora, has been the victim of sabotage that prevented it from being carried by the Arabsat radio and TV satellite service for three weeks.The sabotage took the form of a pirate transmission from within Eritrea that jammed Radio Erena’s signal. The station was unable to resume broadcasting until around 6 p.m. yesterday.Launched by Reporters Without Borders in 2009, Radio Erena is the only source of independent news in the local language for Eritreans inside Eritrea and, as such, has been the target of the government’s constant hostility. (Watch a presentation video about Radio Erena that was made in March 2010)”The fact that Radio Erena was off the air for more than three weeks is no trivial matter,” Reporters Without Borders said. “The station plays a key role by offering impartial and responsible news coverage to an entire people that is otherwise deprived of this. Open to all participants in Eritrean life, whether from the opposition, civil society or the government, Radio Erena is now paying a high price for its independence.” Arabsat, the owner of the BADR-6 satellite that normally carries Radio Erena’s signal, suspended the station on 14 August because of the pirate transmission that had just begun to interfere with its signal.The interference began a day after Arabsat received an Eritrean government complaint claiming that, during an interview with Ethiopian information minister Bereket Simon, Radio Erena had “incited its listeners to acts of violence against Eritrean government representatives.” This was a complete lie, as Reporters Without Borders explained when it provided Arabsat with a transcript of the interview. Let it be noted in passing that Eritrea’s President Issaias Afeworki is one of the world’s worst “Predators of Press Freedom.”Baseless allegationsBroadcast in three parts, on 6, 8 and 10 August, the interview with the Ethiopian information minister covered several topics including relations between his government and the Eritrean opposition and the development of the Ethiopian economy. Although the minister expressed himself freely and directly about the Eritrean government, the radio station did not in any way call for an uprising or acts of violence.The Eritrean journalists who operate Radio Erena were astonished to discover that station’s signal had been cut at around 4 p.m. on 14 August. From that moment onwards, reliable and balanced news reporting was no longer available to Eritreans in Eritrea. All they had was the political propaganda provided by state-owned Eri-TV and Radio Dimtsi Hafash and the government daily Hadas Eritrea.SabotageArabsat concluded from its tests and its investigation that the jamming came from a pirate transmission from within Eritrea. The pirate transmission blocked the entire BADR-6 satellite and forced Arabsat to suspend all of the services it normally offers. Once Radio Erena’s signal had been suspended, the pirate transmission blocking the entire service also disappeared, Arabsat said. In another surprising developement, Radio Erena’s website was brought down by a cyber-attack on 28 August.The site was back online on 1 September, while satellite transmission of Radio Erena’s signal finally resumed the next day.War of words”Irritated by the interview with the Ethiopian information minister, the Eritrean government tried to silence the alternative voice that Radio Erena offers to Eritrea’s citizens,” Reporters Without Borders said.Relations between Asmara and Addis Ababa have been tense every since Eritrea won its independence from Ethiopia in May 1992. Reinforced by a war from 1998 to 2000, the mutual hostility between the two countries has shifted in part to the terrain of the media. Although not a party to the dispute, Radio Erena found itself being targeted.Ranked last in the Reporters Without Borders press freedom index for the past five years, Eritrea is one vast open prison for the journalists. It is Africa’s biggest jail for journalists and the world’s fourth biggest, after China, Iran and Syria.Held for years in various detention centres, many of them since the roundups of September 2001, Eritrea’s imprisoned journalist are dying one by one, forgotten by a largely indifferent world.To prevent a new cyber-attack from depriving Eritreans of the Radio Erena website’s independent news coverage, Reporters Without Borders has created a mirror site. It invites Internet users to use this link http://erena.commentcontournerlacensure.net/ to access an exact copy of the Radio Erena site. to go further RSF_en January 13, 2021 Find out more Help by sharing this information September 3, 2012 – Updated on May 1, 2016 Pirate transmission silences sole independent news outlet for three weeks April 14, 2021 Find out more EritreaAfrica Activities in the field Receive email alerts EritreaAfrica Activities in the field center_img RSF urges Swedish judicial authorities to reverse Dawit Isaak decision Follow the news on Eritrea Organisation News Swedish prosecutors again refuse to investigate Dawit Isaak case October 27, 2020 Find out more Reports News Prisoner of Conscience Since 2001 – Why has Sweden not managed to bring Dawit Isaak home?last_img read more

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Listen: New podcast will highlight Limerick entrepreneurship

first_imgLimerick Post Show | Lifelong Learning Festival TAGSentrepreneurLimerick City and CountyLimerick Post ShowNewspodcastsRichard O’Donnellvideo Email Previous articleGender imbalance on Education and Training boardNext articleDeep-diving into Oneday’s news Cian Reinhardthttp://www.limerickpost.ieJournalist & Digital Media Coordinator. Covering human interest and social issues as well as creating digital content to accompany news stories. [email protected] RICHARD O’Donnell’s first memorable interaction with computers came in the 1980’s when his father was given the gift of a handheld computer.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Bewildered by the gadget, his father asked him, a History and Politics student at the time, to figure out how he might get it to turn on.“Two days later, and with the hairs raised on the back of my neck, it was singing and dancing in my hands,” O’Donnell said, “Accidentally, my new career and lifelong fascination had begun.”“My dad received a present of a brick-sized handheld computer, and I really mean it was brick-size,” Richard told the Limerick Post Show.“It was a thing called a Psion Organiser, he looked at it, and I looked at it. Neither of us knew how to turn it on, so I was given the task over Christmas of trying to figure out how to work this thing,” he explained.“Two days later – I didn’t know it was two days later – I was stuck into it, really enjoying it and starting to programme it. Then my interest in history and politics really went down the drain, although I continued my studies and got my degree, but most of my time was spent in the computer room banging away on computers.”17 years later, at what Richard describes as the “height of the dot com boom” the Limerick software company he had co-founded, Software Architects International (SAI), was successfully acquired by the Atlanta-based Claris Corporation.Richard told the Limerick Post that he never had a “fear” of technology and it was “pure fascination”.“It’s an interesting thing when you’re a computer programmer like I am, the biggest thrill is when you design a programme that actually works,” he said.The Limerick entrepreneur started his career with Analog Devices.“They’d ask you to do a programme that might have something to do with orders, and you’d design, you’d programme it, you’d code it, and after about a week you would do what’s called ‘run the programme’ and the first time that programme runs, it’s such a thrill.”O’Donnell says although people may not see the thrill in that, “but for me there was”. BusinessNewsPodcastsVideoListen: New podcast will highlight Limerick entrepreneurshipBy Cian Reinhardt – September 11, 2019 369 Print Limerick Post Show | HUGG – Healing Untold Grief Groups Limerick Post Show | Let’s Get Talking | Eating Disorders WhatsAppcenter_img Limerick Post Show | Ann Blake launches a new podcast Linkedin Twitter Limerick Post Show | Raging Sons release Someone Else’s Love Advertisement Facebook RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Limerick Post Show | Hunt Museum launch Sculpting Competitionlast_img read more

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Letterkenny Government Office processing over 50,000 BSCFA applications

first_img Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Tuesday May 25th 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic Pinterest 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North WhatsApp WhatsApp Twitter Google+ The Department of Social Protection says it’s office in Letterkenny is processing over 50,000 additional claims for payment under the Back to School Clothing and Footwear Allowance, with half of those claims already processed, including all claims received in June.The dedicated section on Olover Plunkett Road is processing claims which were received on 19July at present. Payment in respect of these claims will issue on a daily basis, so it is expected that the majority of customers will have their payment within five weeks of applying.Some 74% of customers who are expected to qualify for payment of BSCFA in 2013 have now been paid and a total of €35.8million has already been paid out this year.Last month, automatic payments were made to 115,000 families in respect of 207,000 children.Senator Jimmy Harte has praised the staff in the Letterkenny office for the speed at which the applications are being processed. Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal center_img Twitter Google+ Facebook Pinterest By News Highland – August 14, 2013 Facebook News Letterkenny Government Office processing over 50,000 BSCFA applications Previous articleNew Finn Valley Leisure Centre to open at the weekendNext articleHeffernan walks to World Championship gold as Boyce secures a new PB News Highland Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan firelast_img read more

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President Trump and first lady to visit hurricane-ravaged areas in Florida, Georgia

first_imgJoe Raedle/Getty Images(MEXICO BEACH, Fla.) — President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump arrived in Florida Monday afternoon, where they are expected to highlight ongoing recovery efforts following Hurricane Michael as dozens still remain missing in the wake of the deadly storm.Speaking to reporters on the tarmac at Eglin Air Force Base in Okaloosa County, the president repeatedly touted the coordination with Florida Gov. Rick Scott through last week and said the priority is ensuring displaced residents are safe and have access to food and water.“The job they’ve done in Florida has been incredible, and likewise I’m hearing in Georgia pretty good things,” Trump said. “Just making sure everyone’s safe, that they’re fed, you know many of these people, they have no – they have no home. Some of them have no trace of a home, you wouldn’t even know it just got blown right off the footing. So our big thing is feeding and water and safety.”While the White House has not provided a detailed itinerary for the trip, the president tweeted prior to his departure saying he would be sitting “with FEMA, First Responders and Law Enforcement.” The official White House schedule has the president and first lady returning at the White House in the evening.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Stress is too often ignored

first_img Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos. Stress is too often ignoredOn 1 Jun 2001 in Personnel Today The Mental Health Foundation urges that stress at work should be taken moreseriouslyMost companies fail to classify stress as a mental health problem,dismissing it as something all employees suffer from to a greater or lesserdegree, research has claimed. A study of senior executives, Burnt Out or Burning Bright?, by the MentalHealth Foundation was unveiled in April to coincide with Mental Health ActionWeek. Mental health problems are generally only recognised when they are”serious” diagnosable conditions, and stress is not one of these, itsuggests. The report also finds that junior employees suffer more from workplacestress than do their more senior colleagues. The foundation has called on company directors to view their employees’mental health in the same way they do their physical well-being. It has urged that stress should not be sidelined as part of human resourcesbut there should be a national campaign led by a mainstream captain ofindustry. All companies employing more than 100 people should offer some kindof independent employee counselling service, it adds. Those questioned recognise that employees, particularly junior staff, feelthey have to hide their stress and are perhaps unable to recognise stress thatcould become unhealthy. Senior managers are better able to cope with stress it found, by going tothe gym, for example. Newer companies are also found generally to be more aware of the need tomanage stress – for instance by offering external counselling, shiatsu, a quietroom or discounted sporting facilities. “The business world knows just how crucial this issue is, and the waysin which it will have a major impact on business. But their key requirement nowis knowing where to start and how to tackle the problem of undue workplacestress,” said Ruth Lesirge, chief executive of the foundation. In a separate report, the foundation has found that one in four people onlyfind out a friend is experiencing mental health problems when that person isadmitted to hospital. And 5 per cent only realise following a friend’s suicide,it added. The report, Is Anybody There?, found that although nine out of 10 people saythey are able to provide some sort of support to friends experiencing mentalhealth problems, more than one in three people supporting someone with mentaldistress wanted a professional to talk to themselves. 020-7535 7441 last_img read more

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