Tag: Neal

Luke Swanson’s Tripty Project aims to benefit, celebrate Bangladeshi culture

first_img Patagonia Goes 100% Sustainable with New Line Called Shell, Yeah! 5 Canadian Lifestyle Brands You Need to Know Mezcal Unión Takes a People-First Approach to Making Spirits Let’s say for instance you have a hankering for a cheeseburger. Do you opt for a cheap, quickly made option from McDonald’s or would you, perhaps, instead enjoy a handmade, quality-made burger from a lesser known establishment? Obviously for most people, the answer to this question would almost universally point towards the latter of these options. Simply put, people enjoy quality over quantity. So why don’t more people use this line of reasoning for something like the type of clothing or accessories they wear? In time, this is one of the very questions entrepreneur Luke Swanson hopes to answer with his fair trade, responsibly-sourced supply chain company, the Tripty Project.Following roughly two years of work in the environmental science industry in Bangladesh, Swanson decided he wanted to create something which possessed the ability to make a positive impact on the communities in Bangladesh. After witnessing a number of non-governmental organizations misspending money within the country — and seeing firsthand the kind of fallout created by the horrific Rana Plaza collapse in 2013 — creating positive business was paramount for Swanson.“We tried to come up with an idea to work with local organizations that already had a small thing going in the area,” Swanson tells The Manual. “We wanted to make those companies more resilient.”Born from this notion was one of the pillars of the Tripty Project’s entire philosophy, Slow Fashion. A direct response to Fast Fashion — think H&M, Gap, etc. — Swanson intended to avoid pushing out low quality, poorly sourced goods just to save a few cents on each unit. Instead, Swanson and co-founder Brooke McEver wanted to focus on the brand’s process, concentrating on quality of materials and developing something which doesn’t foster continuous consumption. The goal was to create a sustainable company that boosts the culture, society, and environment of Bangladesh for its locals. Today, the duo personally sources the materials used for each project — currently the Tripty Project offers jackets, quilts, and backpacks — and strives to remain as innovative with its use of fabrics as possible.Related: Portland brands take center stage with MadeHere PDXThough the concept for the company officially came to be some two and a half years ago, Swanson admits the company has become more formal over the past year and a half. After toying with the branding and developing a sustainable business plan, Swanson and McEver took the Tripty Project to the popular crowdfunding site, Kickstarter. The initial hope was that a project such as theirs would show people an ethical supply chain isn’t entirely far-fetched but rather, completely feasible. Once the Kickstarter campaign came to a close, it had successfully raised over $34k in funding.Armed with the funding necessary to bring this concept to a wider audience, as well as a passion for making a genuine difference in a marginalized country like Bangladesh, the Tripty Project achieves goodwill while providing a desirable product. Fast Fashion may have the notoriety today, but once people realize they don’t have to settle for something akin to the fast food of clothing, it’s companies like the Tripty Project that will be waiting there with open arms. Editors’ Recommendations How Full Harvest and Misfits Market Are Saving Ugly Produce Keep Your Pants On With the Best Belts for Men last_img read more

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Has Oil Contango Spread to Shipyards?

first_imgzoom South Korea’s Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering (DSME) will build four very large crude carriers (VLCCs) instead of two LNG carriers for an unnamed Oceania-registered client, the shipbuilder said in a stock exchange filing.DSME received the original order for the LNG carriers back in October 2014, with the contract valued at KRW 455.7 billion (USD 412.2m).The new contract for four VLCCs is worth KRW 430.6 billion (USD 389.4m).DSME did not provide any details regarding the specifications of the newly ordered crude carriers.The switch might have been prompted by the recent trend among fuel traders to charter supertankers and store cheaper crude for future sale.The current rates for VLCCs on a Persian Gulf-North Asia route are about USD 69,000/day, while the rates in the time charter market span between USD 33,500 and USD 37,500 per day.World Maritime News Stafflast_img read more

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US removal of textbook with distorted depiction of slavery from classrooms applauded

The information was part of a textbook, The Connecticut Adventure, and stated that slaves in the state of Connecticut were often treated like family members, “taught to be Christian,” and sometimes to read and write. It was taught to students aged nine to 10 until district officials removed it because its depiction of slavery was inaccurate, simplistic, and offensive.“The chapter discussing the history of slavery in Connecticut is a distortion of the true nature of enslavement,” announced Ricardo Sunga, a human rights expert who is the leader of an expert panel set up by the UN Human Rights Council to study racial discrimination around the world. “Enslaved people in Connecticut, like those in the American South before the Civil War, were trafficked against their will, had their fundamental right to life, liberty, and property taken away from them, faced similar levels of exploitation, and were subjected to the most dehumanizing treatment imaginable,” said Mr. Sunga.He added that students need to know that enslaved people were never treated as “family.” Following the decision by the Norwalk, Connecticut school district, the UN Working Group of Experts on People of African Descent has urged that other districts throughout the US – and other countries around the world – follow the example of promoting historical accuracy.The Working Group is also urging the US Department of Education and other school districts in the US and other countries to review textbooks and educational materials in order to determine whether they accurately depict slavery. Where appropriate, they urge officials to remove inaccurate or distorted information from classrooms.“These deeply offensive texts should be replaced with accurate depictions of history which convey the message of the inherent dignity and equality of all human beings,” Mr. Sunga emphasized.“Educators and publishers have a responsibility to ensure that textbooks and other educational materials accurately reflect historical facts on tragedies and atrocities – in particular, slavery, the transatlantic trade in African people, and colonialism.“This will avoid stereotypes and the distortion or falsification of these historical facts, which may lead to racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia, Afrophobia, and related intolerance,” he added.Independent experts are appointed by the UN Human Rights Council. They work on a voluntary basis; they are not UN staff and do not receive a salary for their work and are independent from any government or organization, and serve in their individual capacity. read more

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