Tag: MM自荐 上海

Bilic likens West Brom youngster to Rice after win at QPR

first_imgEmbed from Getty ImagesWest Brom boss Slaven Bilic likened Nathan Ferguson to England star Declan Rice after the youngster inspired the Baggies to a 2-0 win at QPR.Ferguson, 18, was outstanding at left-back and scored his first goal for the club to put them ahead seven minutes into the second half.He strode forward from his own half and sent a right-footed strike past Joe Lumley at the keeper’s near post.Matheus Pereira also scored his first Albion goal – the on-loan Sporting Lisbon man netted with a late free-kick to seal the victory.Former West Ham manager Bilic, who worked with Rice at the east London club, was full of praise for Ferguson and believes he is destined for a bright future.“Nathan has a mentality that reminds me of Declan Rice,” Bilic said.“He’s only 18 on paper but his mind is 25 or 27 – he’s not a kid. He’s only a kid in a positive way in that he’s not afraid to take the ball forward and have a shot.“It’s our job to keep him humble but there’s no doubt that he has an extremely bright future and a great career in front of him.”Albion are unbeaten in seven matches and were much the better side at the Kiyan Prince Foundation Stadium, where Charlie Austin played against his former club along with fellow ex-QPR men Darnell Furlong and Matt Phillips.Austin is still waiting for his first league goal since his summer move from Southampton but Bilic was more than happy with the striker’s contribution and the team’s display.“This is the best performance that we played so far,” Bilic added.“Straight from the start we were on the front foot. They didn’t have a sniff.“We were a bit nervous – we were getting in great situations but were rushing it.“In those situations you maybe need one moment of individual brilliance and we got that with Nathan. We were pure class afterwards.“When we got the second goal it wasn’t game over – you can always come back – but we managed the game really well.“I’m really pleased. Of course we can get better and it’s still early days but I have to say the lads have been excellent.” Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebookby Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksRecommended for youAspireAbove.comRemember Pauley Perrette? Try Not To Smile When You See Her NowAspireAbove.comUndoLifestly.com25 Celebs You Didn’t Realize Are Gay – No. 8 Will Surprise WomenLifestly.comUndoUsed Cars | Search AdsUsed Cars in Tuen Mun Might Be Cheaper Than You ThinkUsed Cars | Search AdsUndoHappyTricks.comHer House Always Smells Amazing – Try her Unique Trick!HappyTricks.comUndoSingapore Property NewsRadisson Hotel Group opens new luxury beachfront resort in VietnamSingapore Property NewsUndoFood World Magazine15 Fruits that Burn Fat Like CrazyFood World MagazineUndoTopCars15 Ugliest Cars Ever MadeTopCarsUndoLight and Charm33 Traditional Beauty recipes from Indian WomenLight and CharmUndolast_img read more

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Comets Didn’t Bring Earth’s Oceans

first_imgSo much for the “water balloon” theory of how Earth got its oceans.  A new study by Belgian planetary scientists pretty much rules out comets as the source of our planet’s abundant water.  Their results are published in this month’s Icarus.1    “The origin of water on Earth is still puzzling,” they began.  Our rocky planet, so close to the sun, should not have formed from ices.  Carbonaceous chondrites contain water sufficient to create a “veneer” of water after the Earth cooled, but ratios of osmium isotopes don’t match.  Comets have long been a popular source.  They’re cold, and made mostly of ice.  Could they have brought water by special delivery to a cooling earth?  Some TV documentaries have brought this story to life with colorful animations.  Early indications from deuterium-to-hydrogen ratios, though, cast doubt on the idea; comets have much more deuterium than ocean water.  Perhaps other classes of comets or asteroids have different ratios.  “Additional constraints are therefore mandatory,” the team said.    Recently, the team found that nitrogen isotope ratios differed significantly between comets and Earth’s atmosphere.  Since any delivery of cometary nitrogen would have been accompanied by water, they used nitrogen isotope ratios to calculate how much water could have come from comets.  The result: very little, probably 6% at most.  Also, since the nitrogen isotope ratios is the same in both Oort Cloud and Kuiper Belt comets, the estimates apply to both classes of objects.  Bottom line: planetary scientists will have to find other sources.  The authors left that question unanswered.1.  Hutsem�kers, Jean Manfroid, Emmanu�l Jehina, and Claude Arpigny, “New constraints on the delivery of cometary water and nitrogen to Earth from the 15N/14N isotopic ratio,” Icarus, Volume 204, Issue 1, November 2009, Pages 346-348.The paper constrains, not disproves, naturalistic models, but it is clear that secular planetary scientists are running out of options (see 03/26/2002, 12/27/2007).  Cometary delivery was already a last resort for the bottom-up worldview.  The top-down worldview, that the Earth was created with its water and was designed with habitation in mind, has less arthritis and dandruff (i.e., less hand-wringing and head-scratching). (Visited 7 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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DV8: putting SA films on the map

first_img20 October 2003The emergence of new technologies and the creation of far-reaching distribution platforms have given rise to an increasing demand for films, particularly in Africa. South African film producers Jeremy Nathan and Joel Phiri have hatched an initiative to satisfy this growing demand.The pair formed the film company DV8 out of their desire to develop, produce, market and distribute African feature films on the continent and throughout the rest of the world.The company aims to facilitate the creation of a sustainable flow of films, not one-off events that become landmarks just for being made. Over the next three years, Dv8 plans to develop, produce and market 12 genuinely South African digital feature films.A maximum of US$10 000 will be spent on the development of each project. It is up to each producer/partner to secure the rights to the project within this budget, as well as produce at least three drafts of the script.The national broadcaster, SABC, will broadcast the films on southern African television. Should the films warrant a theatrical release, Ster-Kinekor will be responsible for release of the films in theatres, on DVD and video. First Hand Films, based in Zurich and Berlin, will handle the worldwide sales of the films.The first film produced was Good Mourning Max, a hilarious, fast-paced comedy about a village boy who tackles the big city armed with only a goat and the amazing ability to cry on cue.Production has started on the second film, Forgiveness, and a third film has already been selected.Forgiveness is being shot on location in Paternoster and Cape Town. It is written by Greg Latter and directed by Ian Gabriel. Internationally recognised South African actor Arnold Vosloo takes the lead role of Tertius Coetzee, a former apartheid cop who is psychologically tormented by the atrocities he committed in his past.Coetzee’s journey into Paternoster is the catalyst for a harrowing series of events that irrecoverably change the fate of the Grootboom family and the community in which they live.The producers are still looking for young, exciting writers and filmmakers around South Africa for the nine remaining films.SouthAfrica.info reporterlast_img read more

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Green Building Priority #9 – Create Resilient Houses

first_imgClimate change is underway, and some of the impacts of that change will affect our homes. We need to account for that in the design, construction, and remodeling of our homes.For starters, we should plan for hotter temperatures. To limit unwanted solar gain, it makes sense to reduce square-footage of west- and east-facing windows, provide overhangs above south-facing windows, and landscape around our homes with plantings that block direct sun. We should increase insulation levels to slow heat flow through the envelope, provide reflective roofing, and design our homes to make effective use of natural ventilation.More intense storms call for greater resistance to wind and rain penetration, use of hurricane straps and other structural features to prevent uplift, more durable roofing, and building geometries that are inherently resistant to wind. We should design to the most stringent building codes, such as the Miami-Dade County Hurricane Code, even in areas where hurricanes are rare.We should build only in locations that are well above flood elevations, avoiding lowland areas. If FEMA flood-elevation maps haven’t been updated recently, we should go beyond those requirements. Our stormwater drainage systems, including storm sewers, should be designed and built to handle increased runoff flow. Heavy winds, ice storms, flooding, heat stress, drought, and other impacts of climate change are likely to cause more frequent and more extended power outages and damage to refineries. Extended drought could cause power outages if water levels in rivers and lakes drop so low that thermoelectric power plants cannot be cooled, and therefore have to be shut down.A new, and perhaps even more frightening, concern is that terrorists of the future might target our energy systems—including electrical distribution lines, oil and gas pipelines, refineries, and power plants—causing extended blackouts or loss of heating fuels. A past director of the CIA, James Wolsey, has raised serious concerns about “cyber-terrorism,” in which people hack into our power generation and distribution infrastructure and cause system failures. Converting to the widely touted “smart grid” could unfortunately increase this vulnerability, even while it offers many advantages.These concerns call for passive survivability as a design criterion. This means creating homes that will maintain livable conditions even during extended loss of power, loss of heating fuel, or shortages of water. To achieve passive survivability involves creating extremely well-insulated homes—homes so well insulated that without any energy inputs they will never drop below 50 or 55 degrees in the winter. Achieving passive survivability requires extremely high insulation levels–in colder climates, this means walls over R-40, ceilings or roofs over R-50, triple-glazed windows with multiple low-e coatings, very tight construction (augmented by mechanical ventilation), and passive solar gain through south-facing windows.In warmer climates, we can see some of the features of passive survivability by examining the “vernacular architecture” that existed before 1950—when air conditioning emerged. Traditional homes in New Orleans had wrap-around porches to keep direct sunlight out and provide outdoor living space in hot weather, and they were designed for natural ventilation. We need to return to this climate-appropriate architecture—but we can give it a modern twist with the benefits of today’s best materials and computer modeling of energy performance.In some parts of the country, droughts of the future may severely limit water availability. Significantly more water-efficient plumbing fixtures and appliances and water-conserving landscaping practices, if adopted widely, will reduce the likelihood that our water supplies become inadequate. And such measures will help individuals get by if water rationing ever becomes necessary during severe droughts or water shortages. Homeowners and municipalities in the West sometimes think about these issues, but drought can also occur in the east, where water is rarely on our minds. Eastern reservoirs tend to be shallower and hold less water than those in the west. In 2007, Atlanta came to within 30 days of running out of water.Many of these elements of resilient design or adaptation to climate change are features that we would want to include in green homes for other reasons–and which will be addressed elsewhere in this top-10 list. But the motivation behind resilient/adaptive design is an important life-safety issue: keeping homeowners safe in the event of natural or man-made disasters.In addition to this Energy Solutions blog, Alex writes the weekly blog on BuildingGreen.com: Alex’s Cool Product of the Week, which profiles an interesting new green building product each week. You can sign up to receive notices of these blogs by e-mail—enter your e-mail address in the upper right corner of any blog page.Alex is founder of BuildingGreen, LLC and executive editor of Environmental Building News. To keep up with his latest articles and musings, you can sign up for his Twitter feed. RELATED ARTICLES center_img Defining Habitable Temperatures Designing Homes and Communities That Can Survive a DisasterResilient CommunitiesResilient Design: Passive Solar HeatResilient Design: Dramatically Better Building Envelopes Designing Houses and Communities To Be Smarter and More ResilientResilience: Designing Homes for More Intense StormsMaking the Case for Resilient DesignBuilding Resilience for a ‘Close Encounter’ with DisasterMaking Houses Resilient to Power Outageslast_img read more

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Ouya Is A Tiny Box Open To Many Game Possibilities

first_img9 Books That Make Perfect Gifts for Industry Ex… 5 Outdoor Activities for Beating Office Burnout Tags:#Ouya 4 Keys to a Kid-Safe App 12 Unique Gifts for the Hard-to-Shop-for People… Related Posts center_img lauren orsini On the left is a photo I took of one of the emulators available, designed to play PlayStation 1 games. While emulators inhabit a legal gray area as a whole, these uncredited screenshots are undoubtedly illegal. Ouya’s creators are fully aware of the emulator/piracy connection, revealed in an interview with Kotaku. Ouya’s official response is that it won’t accept store submissions of emulators that come with games, nor will it accept submitted ROMs of games.However, the Ouya’s major selling point is, once again, that you can do anything you want with it. It’s only a matter of time before piracy finds a way. Since the Ouya has a USB port, I’ve already thought of one option – sideloading games from a flash drive. Can It Compete?I’ve had a lot of fun playing with the Ouya. But as we near its June 25 release date, is it something worth buying over a mainstream console? Quality-wise, it’s no replacement for the PlayStation 3, or in some cases, even the Nintendo 64. Since so many games are indie and homebrew, there’s no guarantee you’ll have good-looking graphics or, in some cases, even controls that work. For some longtime gamers, this may be a small price to pay. Today’s gaming landscape is shrinking, filled with increasing DRM limits that keep us from fully owning the games and consoles we thought we bought. In this kind of world, the Ouya is a respite. As for my husband, I don’t think he’s regretting the Ouya anymore. We’ve either played with it or showed it off to friends for four nights straight. Still, in a few short months it’ll be the holiday season and E3’s offerings will all be released. It’s hard to say if by that point, the Ouya will be gathering dust in the back of a closet while we make room for a shiny new PS4.  As it turned out, we didn’t have long to wait. When we returned from vacation, a tiny box from China had beat us home. Even though we couldn’t agree on the pronounciation (Me: Wee-yah; Him: Oy-yah; Actual: Ooh-ya), we opened it right away. Inside, we found an even tinier box in “rich brown brushed metal.” How small was it? Well, since fruit is such a reliable unit of console measurement, here’s our Ouya with a banana for scale.But neither of our lifetimes of console gaming fully prepared us for what was really inside.An “Anything Goes” SandboxThere’s a reason the Ouya Kickstarter was the first ever to make $8 million. It promised a gaming experience that was as much for developers as for players. And on that selling point, it looks like it has delivered. Ouya’s biggest strength would be a weakness to any other console of this generation – it’s got zero quality control. Just by browsing Ouya Discover (the console’s store), I’ve played games with 3D engines and games that look like they were made in MS Paint.  In other words, you’ll find games on Ouya that you won’t see anywhere else because big companies don’t want to risk their budgets on the weird stuff. They stick with what works and what sells, so you can always expect lots of stubbly white male protagonists navigating war zones. Meanwhile, Ouya exclusives include unusual concepts like Soul Fjord, a combination of Norse mythology and 70s funk. Really. Since nothing’s been tested and developers are playing by ear. Many games, including pixelated side-scroller Fist of Awesome and rhythmic shooter Dub Wars, are trials that link to Kickstarters of their own. Just like Ouya wants you to consider your console the beta version, it’s sometimes the same with the games you can play on it. Likewise, you can start developing your own games on Ouya for free. You can download development tools and even get feedback on your in-progress projects for nothing. Legal Troubles Ahead?When you buy a Ouya, you’re buying complete ownership – the ability to hack, crack and root your console to your liking. With that kind of freedom, it’d be naive to assume owners won’t try anything legally dubious. And sure enough, they already have. Ouya Discover abounds with free emulators, software that mimics the functions of other consoles. Gamers can use them to play homebrew games meant for older systems, such as the Super Nintendo. But aside from legal uses, gamers can also use emulators to play pirated copies of hard-to-find games.  A few weeks before our Ouya arrived in the mail, my husband was having second thoughts. Like 63,416 others, he’d eagerly parted with his cash (in his case, a cool $225 for the limited edition color and name plate etching), during the throes of Kickstarter hype around the open source Android-based gaming platform. Months later and still no Ouya, he was wondering if he’d made the right choice. He wondered why I, the usually-trusty voice of reason against BioShock Infinite Collector’s Edition pre-orders and Magic: The Gathering rares, hadn’t spoken up.“Now, I kind of wish you’d talked me out of it,” he said. But (maybe since I didn’t lose any money on the deal), I was more excited for the Ouya than ever. Un-piqued by June’s monotonous E3 lineup, I was ready for something new. last_img read more

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