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NAHB Embracing Idea of MID Alternatives

first_img  Print This Post Related Articles Brianna Gilpin, Online Editor for MReport and DS News, is a graduate of Texas A&M University where she received her B.A. in Telecommunication Media Studies. Gilpin previously worked at Hearst Media, one of the nation’s leading diversified media and information services companies. To contact Gilpin, email [email protected] in Daily Dose, Featured, Government, Headlines, News Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Share Save Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Home / Daily Dose / NAHB Embracing Idea of MID Alternatives October 4, 2017 1,426 Views About Author: Brianna Gilpin Sign up for DS News Daily Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Previous: Predicting Home Price Appreciation Next: Freddie Mac Securing Seasoned Loanscenter_img In a recent article by Ginger Gibson from Reuters, it was reported that the National Association of Homebuilders (NAHB) has decided against demanding for a new version of the tax code that includes the mortgage interest deduction.Though the NAHB has raised concerns in the past about the current proposals for tax reform which eliminate benefits such as the state and local tax deduction, nullifying the benefits of the mortgage interest deduction and caps to the MID, it is now considering other homeownership boosting alternatives—as long as it offers a homeowner tax credit.“Now our policy is much more flexible,” Reuters reported Jerry Howard, President of NAHB saying. “It gives us a unique opportunity to help craft a unique tax policy as it is related to housing.”President Donald Trump said that a tax code overhaul would be completed his first year in office, but according to the article, there currently is not a written proposal to create a homeownership tax credit to replace the mortgage interest deduction. The plan, or lack there of, is generating much opposition in the housing industry.”[The National Association of Realtors] supports the goals of simplification and structural improvements for the tax system, and individual tax rates should be as low as possible while still providing for a balanced fiscal policy,” Iona Harrison, Chair of NAR’s Federal Taxation Committee said in a statement during a Senate Finance Committee hearing. “We simply believe that to achieve these goals, Congress should commit first to doing no harm to the common interest that homeownership provides.”NAHB’s Howard, however, sees the plan as an opportunity to embrace creative alternatives and said that members of the tax code writing House of Representatives Ways and Means and Senate Finance committees have expressed interest in creating a homeownership credit. Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Tagged with: MID NAHB NAR The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago MID NAHB NAR 2017-10-04 Brianna Gilpin Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago NAHB Embracing Idea of MID Alternatives The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Subscribelast_img read more

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Hyun-Jin Ryu 2.0: Health and ‘pitchability’ have raised Dodgers pitcher to All-Star status

first_img Cody Bellinger homer gives Dodgers their first walkoff win of season Fire danger is on Dave Roberts’ mind as Dodgers head to San Francisco The main propellant in Ryu’s post-surgery rise has been his health. Though he spent three months on the Injured List with a torn groin muscle last season, Ryu’s shoulder and arm have been healthy over the past two years – something he admits now was not true even in the years before his shoulder surgery.“To be honest, the Dodgers knew this when they signed me,” said Ryu, who went on the DL with shoulder pain once in his first two seasons with the Dodgers and also experienced occasional velocity loss. “I wasn’t 100 percent in terms of my body condition and health-wise. So coming back and feeling 100 percent might be the difference in my performance.”To maintain that, Ryu hired his former trainer and brought him over from Korea to work with him throughout the year, paying the trainer out of his own salary.“Once the strength came back I went to Ryu and said, ‘Tell me about your history when you were young … when did you feel your best?’” Boras said. “He was talking about Korea … I kept hearing, ‘My trainer this, My trainer that.’ So I said, ‘Well, let’s get him over here.’”Former Dodger Orel Hershiser collected 105 of his 204 career victories after undergoing a major mid-career shoulder surgery at about the same age as Ryu. But he never again contended for a Cy Young Award as Ryu will for the first time this season.“I think he was good at everything when he became a Dodger,” said Hershiser, now on the team’s broadcast crew, of Ryu’s rebirth. “I think there have been certain points in his career when he realized by watching the opponent that he could be better and I don’t think baseball in Korea ever pushed him to inspect that.“I also think Dave Roberts and this front office and Rick Honeycutt had been pointing out things that he could improve – be it in the weight room, be it in preparing to face hitters and calling your own game and understanding why the catcher is calling something, why the chart has red, yellow and green on it in certain areas and not just following. I think that gave him more commitment and preparation with more health and strength with a new appreciation for being healthy and coming back from it. All of these different categories where he didn’t realize he was a little short or there was more potential I think they’ve all come together at the same time.”Dodgers president of baseball operations Andrew Friedman credits “growth, maturation” as key ingredients that have taken a healthy Ryu to another level this season.“I think fundamentally Hyun-Jin’s not all that different (than before the surgeries),” he said. “It’s that he has a well-above-average ability to execute multiple pitches. Now he’s layering on hitter weaknesses into his gameplan and he’s got a pitch type to get out basically any and all hitters in the big leagues. Now he can sequence off those areas where he’s less likely to take on damage more frequently because of the pointed attack plan he has.”After his two injury-marred seasons, Ryu emerged into a new information age with the Dodgers, Friedman having made over the front office in that time with an emphasis on forward-thinking, sophisticated analytics. Ryu acknowledges it has changed his way of preparing for his starts.“Just like in anything you study, it’s way better if you’re learning actively rather than learning passively,” Ryu said. “My first couple years I was more of a passive learner, just trying to learn about the hitters from other players. But the last two years I’ve been really trying to be more active studying these hitters. I think that resulted in really better pitch sequencing and attacking the hitters in general after getting to know them.”Ryu’s repertoire has grown to five pitches with the addition of a cut fastball post-surgery. For every hitter’s weakness, he has a weapon to attack it.Related Articles Dodgers’ Max Muncy trying to work his way out of slow start Dodgers hit seven home runs, sweep Colorado Rockies “The entire process was really difficult because … I’d rather be out there and be embarrassed giving up home runs and putting up a bad performance rather than being sidelined and just rehabbing by myself. So the entire process was the lowest point of my life.”From the lowest low to the highest high, the 32-year-old Ryu will start Tuesday’s All-Star Game for the National League. It is an honor he has earned by posting the lowest ERA of any starting pitcher in baseball since the start of the 2018 season (1.83 in 32 starts). This season he leads the majors in ERA (1.73) and strikeout-to-walk ratio (9.9) and the NL in WHIP (0.91).It is a rise that Ryu admits feels “surreal” to him.“Of course I always thought I could compete in this league,” said Ryu, the first player to jump directly from the Korean professional league to MLB. “But I didn’t know I was going to perform this well, starting with the second half last year when I came back from that (groin muscle) injury.“It’s kind of funny because the performance I had in Korea wasn’t even as good as the one I’m having now. Obviously, Major League Baseball being a much tougher league, I knew I could compete to a certain extent but not to the level and putting up the performance I’m doing right now.”center_img PreviousHyun-Jin Ryu #99 of the Los Angeles Dodgers gestures toward the stands prior to a MLB baseball game between the Los Angeles Dodgers and the Arizona Diamondbacks at Dodger Stadium on Tuesday, July 02, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Hyun-Jin Ryu (99) throws to the plate against the San Diego Padres during the third inning of an MLB game against the San Diego Padres at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, Calif. on Thursday July 4, 2019. (Photo by Raul Romero Jr, Contributing Photographer) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsHyun-Jin Ryu #99 of the Los Angeles Dodgers stretches in the outfield prior to game one of the National League Division Series against the Atlanta Braves at Dodger Stadium on Thursday, October 4, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Hyun-Jin Ryu (99) throws to the plate against the San Diego Padres during the fourth inning of an MLB game at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, Calif. on Thursday July 4, 2019. Los Angeles Dodgers defeated the against the San Diego Padres 5-1. Photo by Raul Romero Jr, Contributing Photographer)Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Hyun-Jin Ryu walks toward the mound prior to a Major League Baseball game against the San Diego Padres on Thursday, July 7, 2016 in Los Angeles. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Hyun-Jin Ryu (99) throws to the plate San Diego Padres during the first inning of an MLB game at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, Calif. on Thursday July 4, 2019. (Photo by Raul Romero Jr, Contributing Photographer)Los Angeles Dodgers’ Hyun-jin Ryu #99 during photo day at Camelback Ranch Stadium on Wednesday, February 20, 2019 in Glendale, Arizona. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Hyun-Jin Ryu #99 of the Los Angeles Dodgers during a MLB baseball game against the San Diego Padres at Dodger Stadium on Friday, July 05, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Hyun-Jin Ryu #99 of the Los Angeles Dodgers throws to the plate against the Atlanta Braves in the sixth inning of game one of the National League Division Series at Dodger Stadium on Thursday, October 4, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. Los Angeles Dodgers won 6-0. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers’ Hyun-jin Ryu #99 during photo day at Camelback Ranch Stadium on Wednesday, February 20, 2019 in Glendale, Arizona. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Hyun-Jin Ryu throws to the plate against the San Diego Padres in the first inning of a Major League Baseball game on Thursday, July 7, 2016 in Los Angeles. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Hyun-Jin Ryu #99 of the Los Angeles Dodgers warms up in the outfield prior to a MLB baseball game between the Los Angeles Dodgers and the Arizona Diamondbacks during Opening Day at Dodger Stadium on Thursday, March 28, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. Los Angeles Dodgers won 12-5. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Hyun-Jin Ryu #99 of the Los Angeles Dodgers throws to the plate against the Arizona Diamondbacks in the first inning of a MLB baseball game during Opening Day at Dodger Stadium on Thursday, March 28, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Los Angeles Dodgers starting pitcher Hyun-Jin Ryu (99) prior to a Major League Baseball game against the San Diego Padres on Thursday, July 7, 2016 in Los Angeles.(Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)The Dodgers’ Hyun-Jin Ryu will start for the National League in Tuesday’s All-Star Game in Cleveland. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)Hyun-Jin Ryu #99 of the Los Angeles Dodgers gestures toward the stands prior to a MLB baseball game between the Los Angeles Dodgers and the Arizona Diamondbacks at Dodger Stadium on Tuesday, July 02, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)NextShow Caption1 of 15Hyun-Jin Ryu #99 of the Los Angeles Dodgers gestures toward the stands prior to a MLB baseball game between the Los Angeles Dodgers and the Arizona Diamondbacks at Dodger Stadium on Tuesday, July 02, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Keith Birmingham, Pasadena Star-News/SCNG)ExpandIt doesn’t usually work this way.Hyun-Jin Ryu was a good pitcher in his first two seasons with the Dodgers. He went 28-15 with a 3.17 ERA and 1.20 WHIP – better than average for a middle-of-the-rotation starter but not elite. Then he spent most of two years not pitching. He underwent major shoulder surgery to repair a damaged labrum, pitched once then underwent surgery on his elbow as well – completing an unfortunate double of surgically-repaired joints.And emerged as a better pitcher, an elite-level starter.“I thought I knew how this process worked especially because I had Tommy John surgery when I was in high school. But coming back from the shoulder surgery was definitely more than I expected or anticipated,” Ryu said through his interpreter over the weekend. “I tried to focus on my goal of coming back and pitching again. I really tried to cancel all the noise out. That definitely helped me. But to be completely honest, it wasn’t easy at all. “He’s evolved,” All-Star teammate Clayton Kershaw said. “He’s been around the league enough to know what he’s had success with and what he’s had problems with. And he has the ‘pitchability’ to learn different things and manipulate the baseball different ways to get guys out – which not a lot of guys have, not a lot of guys can just be like, ‘You know what? I don’t like my slider today. I’m going to make it more of a cutter.’”In that way, Ryu is a throwback. In a pitching climate increasingly populated by players with upper-90s fastballs who made the big leagues based on “stuff,” Ryu barely averages 91 mph with his fastball. He is an uncomfortable at-bat for hitters not because he overpowers them but because he goes where they didn’t expect – or don’t want to go.“I don’t want to say it’s sad. It’s just not – you take a Dallas Keuchel, who’s had a lot of success and he doesn’t get the contract he wants,” Kershaw said. “Then you see a guy – and no disrespect to Nathan Eovaldi – but just because he throws 100 I feel like that’s the difference in his contract and Keuchel’s.“Yeah, Ryu is a throwback and it’s a shame that more teams don’t recognize that. It’s a lot easier to scout 100 mph than it is to scout pitchability. … I hate to say ‘throwback.’ But there aren’t as many guys that do that. Him and Zack (Greinke) are the two that come to mind.” How Dodgers pitcher Ross Stripling topped the baseball podcast empire Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

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