Tag: 上海风夜

Flash sale: Subscribe from £17.49 and get a pair of Gilbert Tour Trousers!

first_img TAGS: Highlight Check out details and links for Rugby World’s phenomenal special subscription offer, including a free gift As we are feeling generous here at Rugby World magazine, we are giving you the wonderful opportunity to join us as a subscriber from just £17.49, saving a massive 42% in the full price when you subscribe.If that wasn’t enough to catch your eye, we will also send you a pair of Gilbert Tour Trousers as a welcome gift!You may be a faithful reader of Rugby World and buy each issue at the supermarket or newsagent, or you might dip your toe in and out, perhaps buying it whenever you have a long journey. The question you may ask yourself is: “Why should I become a Rugby World subscriber?” Well, in addition to the unrivalled access to the players and coaches behind the thrilling clashes that define the sport of international and elite club rugby union, as well as dispatches from the thriving men’s and women’s grass-roots scene and images that capture the excitement and passion that define our sport, here’s what’s in it for you as a subscriber:You won’t miss a single issue of your favourite magazine – we send it to your home every month with no effort required on your part!As a subscriber you pay less that you would at the newsagent. You will only have to pay £2.92 for each issue, with the lower price guaranteed to you for a minimum of 12 months.You will get access to our iPad/iPhone editions of the magazine thrown in at no extra cost and you can download your first digital version of the magazine right away.We will also send you a fantastic welcome gift!Why not give the world’s best-selling rugby magazine a try? Subscribe today with our half price offer! LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

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M J Hayland: How the Light Gets in

first_imgThere is something about the coming-of-age story that never grows old. While some writers have transformed the tale of adolescence into either sentimental kitsch or unrealistic caricature, others have managed to capture that stage of life with admirable clarity. Though not perfect by any means, M J Hyland is one of the latter. Raised in poverty on the outskirts of Sydney, 16-year-old Louisa Connor – Lou for short – is ready to start her life over. Bright and hardworking, she has won a scholarship to study abroad for one year in the United States. However, having grown up in nearly absolute freedom, she is hardly prepared for a strict suburban host family with a reticent, melancholy father, a neurotic mother, a shallow 13-year-old sister, and a 15-year-old brother who is just a little too happy to have a female exchange student living in his home. We see and empathise with Lou’s loneliness, her mix of affection and disdain for her new family, and the insecurity that ultimately plunges her into a downward spiral; at the same time, we get the sense that there is something missing from the story. While Hyland describes Lou’s host family with vividness and precision, we are left with the question as to why they act as they do. It is obvious that beneath their veneer of suburban smugness, something is terribly wrong; however, we never get to find out just what that something is. Throughout the novel, Hyland develops several subplots that become so interesting as to rival the main plot, but is then forced to abandon them in order to return to Lou’s story. It is unfortunate that one of the most interesting figures in the novel, a Gogol-reading, chess-playing Russian student, has to be dropped simply because he is a minor character. While the need for narrative decision is understandable, it is difficult not to wish for a bit more development of these sideline stories. Another flaw in the story is the dialogue. Although Lou’s spunky speech patterns develop her interesting though alienated character, they occasionally sound a bit contrived. The same holds true for some of the other characters, particularly the host parents. While Hyland may simply be seeking to reveal the superficiality of their conversations, the dialogue still sounds somewhat unrealistic. Nevertheless, with a treasury of elaborate lies about pet kangaroos back home and plenty of sarcastic comments combined with genuine feeling toward others, this book is very poignant and moving.ARCHIVE: 3rd week TT 2004last_img read more

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Girls’ quartet selected to play Switzerland

first_img English U14 champion Lily May Humphreys has been selected for the England team of four to play Switzerland U16 girls at Heswall on Tuesday, August 18. The 13-year-old from Essex (image © Leaderboard Photography) will be joined by Surrey’s Martha Lewis, Spain-based Mimi Rhodes and Amelia Williamson of Norfolk. To see scores for the match, visit the Heswall Golf Club website and click on the link for ‘International Match’. The team is selected from players taking part in the North of England U16 championship at Heswall, from August 19-21. They will be supported in their match and championship preparations by England Golf girls’ coach Scott Godfrey. The players: Lily May Humphreys, 13, (Channels) won the English U14 girls’ championship at Royal Cromer last month. She has also had top 20 finishes in two ladies’ scratch events, the Porters Park Scratch and the Whittington Trophy. Martha Lewis, 15, (St George’s Hill) tied sixth in the English U16 girls’ championship at Royal Cromer. Last year she won the U14 title at the North of England championship. Mimi Rhodes, 13, (La Canada) was runner-up in the English U14 championship and in last year’s English U13 championship. Amelia Williamson, 15, (Royal Cromer) has won three English schools’ titles this year: the national, the U16 and the South East championships. She tied sixth in the English U16 girls and 22nd in the English women’s amateur. 10 Aug 2015 Girls’ quartet selected to play Switzerland last_img read more

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Insurance Agency Head Steps Down after 26 Years

first_imgFacebook76Tweet0Pin0 Submitted by  Barb Lally for Allstate InsuranceBill FunkBill Funk, former owner of the Allstate Insurance office in Lacey on College Street, has retired after 26 years of serving the residents of Thurston County and the South Sound with their insurance needs. Bill has been a resident of the county since 1984 and first opened an office with his wife Marilyn Zuckerman in 1990. The two had met in 1988 working as agents at the former Allstate Insurance booth at the back of the South Sound Sears store in Lacey.“It has been a privilege to be part of this wonderful community, helping families protect the things important to them,” says Funk who prior to working in insurance was a firefighter and served as a volunteer for the Black Lake Fire Department. “There are five offices still owned and managed by members of my family. Insurance is certainly a family business for us.”Bill Funk’s son, Vince Funk and his wife Debbie, own and manage the offices at 4531 Intelco Loop in Lacey and at 104 South Chehalis Street in Aberdeen. Bill Funk’s wife, Marilyn Zuckerman, owns and manages the Allstate office on 1718 State Street in Olympia.Funk’s daughter, Ronelle Funk, owns two Allstate offices. She has owned and managed an office in Yelm at 10501 Creek St SE since 2008. She recently purchased her father’s office on 1601 College Street when he made the decision to retire.“The incredible customer care that my father provided for years will continue in our communities,” says Ronelle Funk who was voted the 2014 Business of the Year by the Yelm Chamber of Commerce. “Dad started something that grew and the great insurance service he provided will remain an example and legacy to all our family offices.”last_img read more

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