Tag: 上海狼族

Santa Clarita Classic to get AT&T name

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREBlues bury Kings early with four first-period goals Tournament director Peter deYoung is getting started on a mammoth task affixing the new name and logo on everything from 1,000 volunteer T-shirts to caddie bibs and assorted signs and banners. “It’s obviously a large job, one where a lot of attention to detail has to be met,” he said. “But it’s not anything that hasn’t already been done before. It’s not sending a man to the moon, but we hope to get 100 percent.” An earlier deal had changed the tournament’s name in 2000 from the Pacific Bell Classic to the SBC Classic. The new AT&T Inc. has to replace both the SBC logo and the old AT&T logo on 50,000 vehicles, 6,000 buildings and 40,000 uniforms and hard hats worn by employees, a process expected to take months. Even SBC Park, the home of the San Francisco Giants, is up for the change. The golf tournament sponsors last month extended the contract with Valencia Country Club through 2007, with an option for 2008. The annual classic was held at sites throughout the Los Angeles region, including Rancho Park Golf Course and Wilshire Country Club, before settling in Santa Clarita in 2001. Attendance has increased by 10 percent to 20 percent each year in Santa Clarita. Last year, the weeklong event drew an estimated 35,000 to 40,000. “It’s going to be managed by the same people,” deYoung said. “It’s going to be the same people playing it. … We look for the same great backing we got from the community (in) the last few years. The volunteers are signing up again. We’re ready to go.” The Associated Press contributed to this report. Eugene Tong, (661) 257-5253 [email protected] 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! VALENCIA – A new but familiar blue globe will hang over Valencia Country Club’s annual Champions Tour golf tournament. With sponsor SBC Communications taking on the name AT&T Inc. after purchasing its former parent company for $16 billion, Santa Clarita’s SBC Classic will become the AT&T Classic, officials said Monday. The tournament is scheduled for March 6-12. San Antonio-based SBC had been Southwestern Bell Corp., one of the “Baby Bells” created when federal regulators broke up AT&T’s national telephone monopoly in 1984. The new AT&T Inc. unveiled its new logo on Monday – a subtly different version of the old blue sphere with the company name, now in lowercase, below it. last_img read more

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Christmas comes early for 90-year-old €2,000 raffle winner Peg!

first_imgThe Annual Croí Golden Ticket Raffle results were announced on Wednesday, December 18, with 90-year-old Peg Murrin from Killybegs winning the top prize of €2,000! The second prize of €1,000 went to Claire Connolly from Oranmore, now living in Australia.Claire’s Grandmother Julie, a stroke survivor and member of Croí’s Stroke Support Group, purchased the ticket for her granddaughter. The draw took place at 1:30pm in Croí House, with a total prize fund of €5,000.An incredible €65,000 was raised through Croí’s annual Christmas fundraiser, with funds going to support stroke survivors and their carers. With thanks to generous donors, Croí is able to offer free stroke support services, including specialised physical activity programmes and support groups.Former Garda Sergeant John Kelly from Cregmore, Co. Galway pulled the winning names from the draw.John survived a stroke eight years ago and now receives specialist support from the Croí Health Team, including communication sessions with a Speech and Language Therapist. The winners of the 2019 Croí Golden Ticket Draw:· 1st prize, €2,000 – winner is Peg Murrin, Donegal· 2nd prize, €1,000 – winner is Claire Connolly, Australia· 3rd prize, €500 – winner is Ursula Dineen, Sligo· 4th prize, €250 – winner is Ultan McDonagh, Galway· 5th prize, €250 – winner is Kevin Cume, Co Clare6th – 15th prize, €100 – winners are Marie Partridge, Dublin; Thomas Walsh, Mayo; Flan Tierney, Clare; Margaret McLaughlan, Donegal; William Quinn; Marie Darcy, Galway; Marian Carey, Donegal; David Kavanagh, Galway; Derek Kennedy, Galway; Hugh Martyn, Galway.Seller’s prizes: Sr Margaret Coyle, Galway; Kathleen Heraty, Mayo; Kathleen Joyce, Galway.Thank you to everyone who purchased tickets – your support helps us continue to help stroke survivors and their families. Special thank you to our Golden Ticket Raffle prize fund sponsor Coen Steel for their generous support, and Corrib Oil for sponsoring the seller’s prizes.Christmas comes early for 90-year-old €2,000 raffle winner Peg! was last modified: December 19th, 2019 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:croiKillybegsPeggy MurrinRafflewinnerlast_img read more

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Can The Midfield Carry The US Womens National Team Past France

Rose LavelleUSA5.703.42 The U.S. has solidified the middle of the fieldInternational players* who averaged three or more progressive passes and tackles per 90 minutes, 2017-19 The story of the U.S. women’s national team has almost always been its goal-scorers. In the past, the team could count on an Abby Wambach or an Alex Morgan, and when a midfielder like Carli Lloyd stepped up to support, it was her goal-scoring, again, that made the difference. The problems for the U.S. typically lie a little further back down the pitch. At the World Cup in Canada in 2015, the team needed the last-minute addition of Morgan Brian to balance its midfield and get past Germany en route to the final.This year, the situation is reversed. Going into a match against France that could easily decide the World Cup winner, the Americans have reason to be confident in its midfield but increasingly concerned about a suddenly shaky forward line.Manager Jill Ellis has preached an aggressive possession approach, seeking to control the ball but use that control for penetration into the attacking third. That is not an easy balance to strike, at least not without leaving the defense exposed to counterattacks, but it’s possible if your players are good enough.Lindsey Horan came into the World Cup recognized as probably the top central midfielder in the world, and if anything, she has been outshone by her midfield mates Sam Mewis and Rose Lavelle in this tournament. With this squad, Ellis has preferred a 4-3-3 formation to the team’s previous 4-4-2, effectively trading a central striker out for a central midfielder. The three-woman midfield features one deeper-lying holding midfielder and two more advanced in front of her. The team was prepared to play Julie Ertz at the base of midfield and push Horan further up the pitch, but in the final group match against Sweden, Ellis went with the Horan-Mewis-Lavelle trio.These three were the team’s statistical standouts coming into the World Cup. Among players with at least 1,000 minutes played in international matches tracked by Opta since 2017, few midfielders can match the U.S. trio for all-around production. The three are among the very best in the world at the combination of ball-winning and ball-progression, among players with at least three tackles and interceptions won per 90 minutes as well as three progressive passes and runs per 90.1Progressive passes are defined as passes which advance the ball 10 to 15 yards beyond its furthest progression in the move or into the penalty area. Ertz misses the chart because while she has the excellent ball-winning numbers (4.8 tackles and interceptions per 90) you would expect from a defensive midfielder, her 1.8 progressive passes per 90 reflect her lesser skill at advancing the ball.When both Lavelle and Mewis join Horan, the U.S. is basically impossible to match up with in midfield. Each player is capable of making a defense-splitting pass or run, as well as cleaning up defensively behind whoever takes a turn attacking.This kind of midfield production was expected from Mewis and Horan, but Lavelle has been a surprise. Despite her excellent ball-winning numbers for the national team, the smaller Lavelle has been cast typically as a “number 10,” an attacking midfielder. Playing in a 4-3-3 at the World Cup, however, Lavelle has continued to show her strength in the press, with five tackles and four interceptions in a little over 200 minutes.In the round of 16 against Spain, Ertz got the call while Horan rested to avoid a yellow card suspension. One might suggest that Ertz’s less aggressive approach might have been responsible for the U.S.’s rather blah performance, but the statistics suggest the problem lies elsewhere. The U.S. successfully moved the ball into the final third in open play 38 times, but created only three shots from these moves. This rate — of shots created among balls in the final third — is under 8 percent, the second-lowest of any team that played in the knockouts. Seventeen of those final third entries came from direct attacking moves,2Direct attacking moves are defined as sustained possession actions in which at least 50 percent of the ball movement is toward goal. the fourth-best total among the 16 teams in the knockouts, but only one generated a shot attempt in the move. That 6 percent success rate was the worst among the teams in the round.Against Spain, the U.S. forwards struggled to turn dangerous possessions into scoring chances. After winning an early penalty, Tobin Heath was not effective. Heath — usually the key outlet for the U.S. in attack and a skilled dribbler — couldn’t get on the ball, playing only 16 passes (fewest of the starters) and losing two of her three take-on attempts. The most worrying number for the U.S., however, was zero. That’s the number of shots Morgan attempted against Spain. Morgan was subbed out against Sweden after taking a knock and though she returned to start against Spain, the bruising Spanish defense kept her from finding space in the penalty area or on the break.Fortunately for the Americans, if Morgan is hurting or the wide forwards are slumping, the team’s attacking power runs deep. Carli Lloyd, Christen Press and Mallory Pugh are three of the top goal creators in the women’s game over the last few years. PlayerCountryGoalsAssistsGoals and assists Sam MewisUSA3.293.67 Per 90 Minutes The biggest worry for the U.S. has to be Morgan. If the Orlando Pride striker is not fully fit, she is likely to struggle again against France.Ellis, then, faces two high-stakes decisions before the quarterfinal. First, will she roll with the more aggressive Horan-Mewis-Lavelle midfield, or will she go more conservative by deploying Ertz at defensive midfielder? The defensive strength that Horan, Mewis and Lavelle have shown in this tournament is an argument for including them and, thus, maximizing ball movement in the center of the pitch. Second, and more importantly, which forwards are ready to take on the great French defense? Heath, who probably just had an ill-timed off match, should be favored to bounce back. Morgan’s fitness is more of a worry. But however Ellis assesses her starting forwards, the options to replace one are rich and varied. Press and Lloyd would offer two different looks at striker. Pugh could spell either winger or give the team an interchanging, hard-to-mark front three.The midfield, especially with the three best passers on the pitch, should be good enough to carry the team. But if the front line doesn’t show up, the U.S. once again risks wasting the good ball progression from midfield. Amandine HenryFrance3.693.12 Tobin HeathUSA0.560.320.89 Jackie GroenenNetherlands4.483.09 Carli LloydUSA0.560.220.78 * Minimum of 1,000 minutes in matches tracked by OptaSource: Opta Caroline SegerSweden3.973.06 Valérie GauvinFrance0.710.160.87 Lina MagullGermany3.193.54 Christen PressUSA0.280.500.78 Vivianne MiedemaNetherlands1.130.311.44 Caitlin FoordAustralia0.620.441.06 Lindsey HoranUSA4.813.28 The U.S. is deep in goal creatorsInternational players* with the most open-play goals and assists per 90 minutes, 2017-2019 Alex MorganUSA0.680.170.85 * Minimum of 1,000 minutes in matches tracked by OptaSource: Opta Sports PlayerteamTackles and interceptionsProgressive passes Samantha KerrAustralia1.090.361.45 Check out our latest Women’s World Cup predictions. Emily van EgmondAustralia3.273.27 Ellen WhiteEngland0.680.230.91 Mallory PughUSA0.490.270.76 read more

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