Tag: 上海油压店怎么都关门了

Clubs able to accept Domer Dollar donations

first_imgThe idea for Domer Dollar Donations originated two years ago when Jain, attempting to collect money for charities as the Center for Social Concerns (CSC) commissioner for his dorm, heard students saying they would give Flex Points or Domer Dollars if they could. “Regardless of whether or not students had cash on them, they felt more willing to give money if it was more convenient for them,” Jain said. In Spring 2009, Jain and the Student Senate Committee developed a proposal. After communicating with Food Services, the Student Activities Office (SAO) and LaFortune Administration, the program is set to begin. “This program will not just be located in front of the elevators in LaFortune,” Jain said. “If the program has a successful start, then maybe more swipe machines for donating will pop up at dining halls, or, in an ideal world, a CSC commissioner or club board member would be able to walk around with a wireless swipe machine and collect donations.” When student groups fill out an SAO request online form for a table in front of the LaFortune elevators, they can select to have the swipe machine, which is similar to the machines at the dining halls. Students can state the amount of money they wish to donate, swipe their card, and be on their way, Jain said.Rachel Roseberry, the Social Concerns chair, used the machine Friday to sell the benefit CD “Head Above Water.”  The profits from the CD go to Student Government’s Global Water Initiative.“The Domer Dollars machine was easy and efficient to use, and it definitely increased our selling potential,” Roseberry said. “Some students were able to purchase the CD who would not have been able to before because they weren’t carrying cash. The machine is a great tool to allow Notre Dame students to give back with convenience, and it will be a great resource for any club that utilizes it.” The elevators in LaFortune are often a prime spot for student organizations to raise funds for charities. However, students have long expressed concern about their ability to donate cash, which few have on hand.  Charlie Jain, a senior in Zahm Hall, found a solution to this problem with a proposal that he calls Domer Dollar Donations. Jain brought up the idea of using Domer Dollars to the CSC social commissioner at the time, and the proposal passed through Student Senate in Fall 2008, Jain said. “The ultimate goal for the program is to better aid the beneficiaries of student clubs,” Jain said. “In doing so, this program will help students act on what they believe by enabling them to give monetary donations to charities, even when students do not usually have much money.”last_img read more

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What kids want: Family dinners

first_imgA story to dine in on: Kids who sit down for family dinners are healthier and smarterStuff co.nz 29 July 2018Family First Comment: Over the weekend, the Sunday Star Times jumped on the bandwagon of our superb report from two days earlier. Read our report instead https://www.familyfirst.org.nz/2018/07/call-for-public-health-campaign-to-promote-family-dinners/Most Kiwi families are going in the other direction. We are letting this simple analogue mealtime face-to-face connection slip out of our lives.A study by independent researcher Sarah Woollett, commissioned and developed by My Food Bag and Stuff, reveals we’re eating at home less often and together less often.The just-released Family Dinners survey involved 521 children and 630 adults across the country.It paints a picture of fewer family meals together, of stressed parents working late and out of sync hours to cover for each other, of takeaways and of eyes staring at screens instead of each other. Parents know something is wrong because – in their own words – they feel guilty.A generation ago three-quarters of children ate dinner with their parents every night. This survey indicates now only 51 per cent of families eat every dinner at home together.One of the sadder findings is while 96 per cent of children see dinner as a great chance to chat to parents, 79 per cent wish they could have more dinners together as a family.Reasons why adults wished they could have more dinners at home included mentions of: “quality family time” (32 per cent); “it’s cheaper” (16 per cent); “it’s healthier and more nutritious” (10 per cent); “it’s a chance to catch up” (8 per cent); “it’s better tasting or better food” (7 per cent).READ MORE: https://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/105584089/A-story-to-dine-in-on-Kids-who-sit-down-for-family-dinners-are-healthier-and-smarter?cid=app-iPhoneGroundbreaking survey of NZ kids reveals disappointment at lack of time with parentsStuff co.nz 29 July 2018Kiwi kids are sad they’re not spending time with their parents, according a groundbreaking study of how parents’ lifestyles impact their families.The just-released Dinners Make Families survey of 521 children and 630 adults reveals 79 per cent of kids wish they could have more dinners together as a family.While 96 per cent of children surveyed see dinner as a great chance to chat to parents, almost two-third of the children interviewed said their parents are too busy and they wish they had more time together (68 per cent, where both parents work).​Dinners, cooking, conversations, we’re simply spending less time with our families at home than a generation ago.READ MORE: https://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/105682721/Groundbreaking-survey-of-NZ-kids-reveals-disappointment-at-lack-of-time-with-parents?cid=app-iPhoneFewer Kiwi kids using a knife and fork at dinner as families become busierStuff co.nz 29 July 2018According to the 1861 etiquette bible The Book of Household Management, family meals should be planned, served and cooked “with the same cleanliness, neatness, and scrupulous exactness” as a dinner party, and the table set with porcelain and genuine silverware.“If this rule be strictly adhered to, all will find themselves increase in managing skill; whilst a knowledge of their daily duties will become familiar, and enable them to meet difficult occasions with ease, and overcome any amount of obstacles,” wrote the book’s author, Mrs Isabella Beeton.Modern etiquette coach Jodi Tempero says although many families no longer have time to regularly launder tablecloths and cloth napkins, having good table manners can be the difference between success and failure at home, at work or with friends.But new research set to horrify traditionalists has revealed most Kiwi parents don’t require their kids to use cutlery, let alone napkins – even if most are loath to admit it.Just 47 per cent of 8-to-12-year-olds eat with a knife and fork every night – much fewer than a generation ago, when 65 per cent always used cutlery. That finding is from a big study of 1100 families by independent researcher Sarah Woollett, commissioned and developed by My Food Bag and Stuff.Only a third of families lay a cloth and set the table, and just 18 per cent are expected to ask permission before leaving the table. That’s if they’re even at the table: increased numbers of kids now eat their evening meal in the kitchen.READ MORE: https://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/105684412/Fewer-Kiwi-kids-using-a-knife-and-fork-at-dinner-as-families-become-busier?cid=app-iPhoneWe choose swipes, taps and remotes instead of family dinner chatStuff co.nz 5 August 2018If you think family dinners are the last refuge of real conversation and relationships, think again.The most confronting finding of a national survey on the New Zealand family dinner was how much we are using our devices, phones and TVs while sitting and eating together.It shows 74 per cent of kids are buried in screens at dinner. And an amazing 83 per cent of their parents are doing the same.It’s the context of when that is happening that is most surprising – because we all say we want to spend quality time together.The study by independent researcher Sarah Woollett, commissioned and developed by My Food Bag and Stuff, reveals just 51 per cent of families eat dinner together each night. Three-quarters did so a generation ago.It also reveals a vast majority of children want more family dinners together and guilt-ridden parents want the same.READ MORE: https://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/105520766/we-choose-swipes-taps-and-remotes-instead-of-family-dinner-chatKeep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox.last_img read more

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Syracuse faceoff specialists look for improved play in scrimmage against Le Moyne, Hofstra

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on January 22, 2014 at 11:51 pm Contact Jesse: [email protected] | @dougherty_jesse Much of Syracuse’s preparation for the 2014 season has been centered on the last game it played. Rewind to May 27, 2013. Syracuse holds a 6-5 advantage over Duke at halftime and is two periods away from capturing the 12th NCAA tournament championship in program history. But then an old friend crept up on the Orange and spurred an 11-4 Blue Devils run. The final score read 16-10 in Duke’s favor and faceoffs were the decisive factor.“We’ve worked on them a ton,” redshirt junior midfielder Henry Schoonmaker said of faceoffs. “Last year that was like our downfall so it’s something we have to figure out.”The Orange will get its first shot to rectify problems at the X on Saturday, when Le Moyne and Hofstra visit the Carrier Dome for a three-way scrimmage at 10 a.m. SU still hasn’t solidified its faceoff core, but head coach John Desko named Chris Daddio, Ricky Buhr and junior college transfer Mike Iacono as those who will get faceoff opportunities this weekend. AdvertisementThis is placeholder textCal Paduda missed the previous week of practice with a hand injury and is questionable, but he’s in the mix moving forward. Desko said he will be back soon.Le Moyne and Hofstra don’t present the stiff competition the team will see in its first year in the Atlantic Coast Conference, but the tuneup will be a good measuring stick for where the Syracuse faceoff unit stands.“It was a point of emphasis when we walked off the field after our last game last year,” Desko said. “We’ve been doing it so much in the fall.”In last year’s national championship, Duke’s Brendan Fowler handcuffed the Orange and pushed the Blue Devils to the title. He took 20 of the game’s 30 total faceoffs and lined up for all but two. On the other hand, SU tried six different players at the X. Daddio finished the game 0-for-4 and Paduda 3-for-13. As Desko has expressed many times this preseason, he’d love to find a guy, like Fowler, that he could rely on to keep the ball in his offense’s hands.On Tuesday, Desko didn’t reveal much, but hinted that Iacono could be a possible answer. “He’s been very competitive,” Desko said. “Sometimes it’s a matchup issue where he’s done better than a couple of guys he’s going against. He’s been very comfortable coming in and he’s good when he picks it up. He’s probably the best guy we have after he gets the ball, too.”Iacono joined the Orange last week along with fellow junior college transfer Randy Staats. In a decorated career at Nassau Community College on Long Island, he was a two-time NJCAA All-American, led the Lions to two straight national title games and won 78 percent of his faceoffs that were recorded. At 6-foot-5 and 225 pounds Iacono is the biggest guy in the faceoffs mix and is looking to bring a deliberate approach to the X this season. The junior midfielder says he always starts the same way and can do every one of his moves out of that position, so defenders don’t get any advantage.It’s an approach that has worked well with him since breaking in with SU.“All the faceoff guys are well-rounded athletes,” Iacono said. “For me, I feel like it’s going to be tougher to get a starting spot, but when I do I’ll definitely keep it held down.”The Orange still has time to solidify the faceoff position, but Saturday’s scrimmage is one of the final chances leading up to the team’s season-opening game against Siena on Feb. 10. Figuring out the X is on everyone’s agenda, and Iacono assessed the coming season by breaking the game into two spheres.“Lacrosse is all about X play and goalies. Everybody knows that,” Iacono said. “If you don’t have a good X man, you’re never going to get the ball to score. That’s what it comes down to.” Commentslast_img read more

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The low-down on Boeheim’s Army before The Basketball Tournament tips

first_img Published on July 8, 2017 at 5:00 pm Contact: [email protected] | @jtbloss PHILADELPHIA — The Basketball Tournaments starts Saturday with regional play in Philadelphia and Charlotte, North Carolina. Boeheim’s Army, a team composed of SU basketball alumni, plays at 6 p.m. in the northeast region’s preliminary round home of Philadelphia University. As the region’s No. 3 seed, the former Orange take on 14-seed DuBois Dream, a team of players hailing from the DuBois, Pennsylvania area. As the seeding shows, DuBois Dream is a clear underdog.Here’s what else you need to know for this weekend’s action:What is The Basketball Tournament?TBT is a 64-team, single-elimination tournament. The games are five-on-five. Anyone older than 18 is eligible, and most teams are made up of guys who played for the same college program or grew up in the same city. It is broadcast and streamed by ESPN. The winning team takes home a prize of $2 million.Teams enter through a variety of avenues. Nine teams in each of the four regions are chosen strictly by fan voting. Boeheim’s Army was one of the top vote-getters in the northeast region. Six more are at-large teams, meaning they met certain requirements, including the minimum of 100 fans and seven players. The final team in each region competed in a play-in tournament, called TBT Jamboree.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textMeet the squadNew members of Boeheim’s Army include Trevor Cooney, John Gillon, Scoop Jardine and DaShonte Riley. Altogether, the roster includes eight current pros. Also playing are current SU assistant Eric Devendorf, C.J. Fair, Rick Jackson, Donte Greene, James Southerland and Brandon Triche. However, Southerland is unavailable this weekend because he’s out west participating in the NBA summer league play, and Greene won’t be in Philadelphia until Sunday. Boeheim’s Army will play then if it wins Saturday.The team is coached by former SU big man Ryan Blackwell and managed Kevin Belbey, a former student manager for SU and a graduate of both the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications and SU’s College of Law.Joe Bloss | Senior Staff WriterThrowback at TBTThis the third TBT entry for Boeheim’s Army in TBT’s four-year existence. Last year, it advanced the Super 16, after going one step further the year before and losing in the regional championship game. 2016’s loss came at the hand’s of The Untouchables, a team of mostly Pitt alumni. In 2015, Boeheim’s Army was a top seed but fell in a close matchup to City of Gods, a team that had five players with NBA experience.Former players not joining the Army this year include Hakim Warrick and Demetris Nichols.Counting chickens before they hatchIt’ll take a two wins from each team to get there, but should top seeds prevail, Boeheim’s Army would meet SuperNova, a team of Villanova alumni in the Super 16. SuperNova’s roster is made up of multiple players from Villanova’s 2009 Final Four team, including Scottie Reynolds and Reggie Redding. The matchup would be clash of a storied Big East rivalry.If Boeheim’s Army wins Saturday, it will play the winner of City of Gods and Gaelnation, a team of Iona alumni. Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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