Tag: 上海夜网LM

Gold prices hit $2,000 an ounce for first time

first_imgGold prices on Tuesday hit $2,000 an ounce for the first time, the latest surge in a commodity seen as a refuge during economic uncertainty.The precious metal hit the symbolically important benchmark near 1615 GMT before retreating somewhat then crossing the line again about 30 minutes later. Gold prices have risen more than 30 percent this year as the coronavirus outbreak has weakened the economy and clouded the global financial outlook. Wall Street stocks were cautiously advancing around 1645 GMT with the Dow up 0.4 percent as traders digested reports claiming recent progress towards a deal in Washington.”There’s a big desire from both parties to get some kind of stimulus passed. I think the market is expecting that,” said Bob Phillips, at Spectrum Management Group. Topics :center_img Also weighing on investors were concerns over whether the United States will pass another spending measure to support the world’s largest economy as it weathers a prolonged and deadly coronavirus outbreak. Democrats and Republicans in Congress have yet to strike a deal despite days of negotiations.”The gold price is viewed as buying opportunities,” Commerzbank said in an analysis.”This comes as no surprise in view of the ongoing high numbers of new COVID-19 cases, the continuing cliffhanger in US Congress over an additional economic aid package, ever more widespread negative real interest rates and highly-valued stock markets.”last_img read more

Read More
Mum Wanted to Die So She Wouldn’t Be a Burden – But Convincing Her to Live Gave Us Both a Gift Beyond Measure

first_imgThe Huffington Post 3 September 2015As she lay in the hospice, ghostly pale and apparently slipping away before my eyes, my mother was adamant. ‘I just want to die,’ had become her repeated refrain. She was 84, suffering from advanced breast cancer and didn’t want chemotherapy. As far as she was concerned, the end could not come soon enough. ‘I’ve had a good life,’ she would say. ‘But I don’t want to be dependent. I don’t want to be a burden to anyone.’Had assisted suicide been legal, she made it quite clear that it would have been her chosen path. ‘I’d go for it,’ she told me, with a fixed, determined look in her eye. The situation certainly seemed hopeless, particularly after a scan revealed that the cancer had spread to huge areas of her pelvis and lower back.With every movement accompanied by excruciating pain, she agreed, reluctantly, to have radiotherapy on her disintegrating pelvis. But it seemed to make little difference; only the pain-killing drugs helped. She was getting weaker by the day and couldn’t wait to be released by death. Seeing a parent suffer is a terrible experience for anyone, but for me, there was an added and cruel irony: I’m a professor of palliative care.I have dedicated my career as a physician to improving the care of the terminally ill – and yet here was my dreadfully sick mother, stopping just short of asking me to help her die.By the bitterest of coincidences, as she lay in her hospice bed, I was also vigorously opposing a Bill in the House of Lords that would have made assisted suicide legal. The situation was tearing me in two. Mum had fought for her family all her life. So how could I ignore her wishes? I believed passionately in the cause I was fighting in Parliament – that every life is of value and should never be ended by legalised ‘death by appointment’.But seeing my lovely mother dying in a hospice bed, despite the gentle, caring nursing and the patient doctoring, was almost too much to bear. Sixteen years earlier, I had left general practice and become a full-time hospice doctor because I wanted to improve the care of the dying. I longed to change health care so that staff listened to patients and valued each one, even when those patients were desperately ill, disabled or beyond a cure.As I discovered, a terminally-ill person can live a lot of life in a short space of time – and I wanted to bring hope to their moments of despair. And yet I felt powerless to help my own mum. My brother, John – who had been desperately sick as a baby and who my mother had breastfed moments before taking him down for an operation that no one was sure he would survive – played peacemaker, desperately trying to reconcile his mother’s anger with his sister’s distress.But it was the hospice chaplain who unlocked the door. Wise enough to realise there was no point talking about God to this agnostic lady and experienced enough to know we all have a story, he quietly and patiently asked Mum to tell him hers.And so he sat, this quiet, unassuming man, and listened, soaking up the years, as she told him her views and philosophy on life. And it was in this telling that it dawned on Mum that her decrepit body still held an active mind. Suddenly, she realised that if she wasn’t going to be allowed to kill herself, she had better make the most of what time remained.So day by day, she took more pain relief, which first enabled her to get out of bed and then to take a few tentative steps with a Zimmer frame. Every day, she tried to take a few steps more. ‘I’m training for the London marathon,’ she laughed, after five, seven and then ten yards on the Zimmer. And then, almost miraculously, the radiotherapy began to work, her pain disappeared and she was able to leave the hospice and go home.My mother would go on to live for another four years and it’s no exaggeration to say that those four years were almost more precious than the 84 that had preceded them.http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/baroness-ilora-finlay/assisted-dying_b_8075776.html?utm_hp_ref=uklast_img read more

Read More
Another record car count set as Taylor builds on Dakota Tour success at Estevan

first_imgESTEVAN, Sask. (July 7) – Despite leading all 30 laps, Jeff Taylor got to enjoy Monday’s Kupper Chevrolet Dakota Classic Tour main event at Estevan Motor Speedway from a couple perspec­tives.Taylor won his second IMCA Xtreme Motor Sports Modified tour event in as many nights while Steven Pfeifer was second and Shawn Anderson fourth in Taylor Chassis rides. “I’d have been happy with either one of them passing me and winning,” Taylor said. “I’d have been tickled to death.” The win was worth $2,000 and came in a contest slowed by caution just once, on lap 12. Curt Lund was third and Shawn Anderson fifth. Seventy-six Modifieds from 14 states and Canada ran at Estevan. That’s the most ever entries for the division north of the border as the series set new car count records in the first two events of 2014. “I never thought about winning the first two races of this series. It’s the first time I’ve ever started a series like this,” said Taylor, who’d topped the Sunday show at Nodak Speedway. “There is some luck involved but we’ve got a good car.” Dalton Flory topped the $800 to win tour feature for IMCA Sunoco Stock Cars, taking the check­ers ahead of defending champion and first-night winner Elijah Zevenbergen. “It’s awesome to get a win on this tour because you’ve got all these heavy hitters here,” said Flory, who led every time around in a 25-lapper than went green to checkers. “I could run with them last year so it was good to be able to show what I can do in a race car.”Flory encountered his first lapped cars just 10 circuits in and caught up with slower cars again with five to go. Zevenbergen peeked inside a couple times but couldn’t catch Flory. He’d won four straight tour starts dating back to last July 9. Brendon LaBatte, Kody Scholpp and Jake Nelson ended third through fifth, respectively. Primary sponsors for Flory’s ride are his parents Joe and Misti. A new series record 36 Stock Cars saw action Monday.The third of six series installments takes both divisions to Williston Basin Speedway for a Tues­day, July 8 program. Pit gates open at 2 p.m., the grandstand opens at 5 p.m., hot laps are at 6 p.m. and racing starts at 7 p.m. Feature Results Modifieds – 1. Jeff Taylor, Cave City, Ark.; 2. Steven Pfeifer, Minot, N.D.; 3. Curt Lund, Redwood Falls, Minn.; 4. Shawn Anderson, Minot, N.D.; 5. Scott Drake, Joplin, Mo.; 6. David Murray Jr., Oberlin, Kan.; 7. Jett Big Eagle, Manor; 8. Jordan Grabouski, Beatrice, Neb.; 9. Mike Jergens, Plover, Iowa; 10. Brian Mullen, Seymour, Wis.; 11. Adam Larson, Ankeny, Iowa; 12. Rusty Koll­man, Carrington, N.D.; 13. Tim Ward, Gilbert, Ariz.; 14. Mike Hansen, Dickinson, N.D.; 15. Shawn Strand, Mandan, N.D.; 16. Eric Burwick, Dickinson, N.D.; 17. Spencer Wilson, Minot, N.D.; 18. Jeremy Keller, Mandan, N.D.; 19. Jordan Huettl, Minot, N.D.; 20. John Hansen, Brush, Colo.; 21. Tanner Matthewson, Redvers; 22. Lance Mari, Imperial, Calif.; 23. Ed Turnbull, Estevan; 24. John Flory, Williston, N.D.; 25. Tracy Domagala, Bismarck, N.D.; 26. Eric Sinness, Williston, N.D. Heat winners were Murray, Anderson, Turnbull, Larson, Lund, Pfeifer, Taylor and Drake.1st “B” feature (top four) – 1. Mullen; 2. Flory; 3. Huettl; 4. Domagala. 2nd “B” feature – 1. Big Eagle; 2. Grabouski; 3. Keller; 4. Ward. 3rd “B” feature – 1. Mari; 2. Kollman; 3. Matthewson; 4. Sinness. 4th “B” feature – 1. Burwick; 2. Jergens; 3. Mike Hansen; 4. John Hansen. Stock Cars – 1. Dalton Flory, Williston, N.D.; 2. Elijah Zevenbergen, Ocheyedan, Iowa; 3. Bren­don LaBatte, Radville; 4. Kody Scholpp, Estevan; 5. Jake Nelson, Williston, N.D.; 6. Jordan Dur­ward, Trenton, N.D.; 7. Dave Swallers, Williston, N.D.; 8. Greg Wichman, Bonduel, Wis.; 9. Na­than Burke, Minot, N.D.; 10. Gregg Mann, Estevan; 11. Jeremy Swanson, Clarinda, Iowa; 12. Aus­tin Daae, Estevan; 13. Jake Lunderby, Sidney, Mont.; 14. Perry Misner, Garden City, Kan.; 15. Terry Davidson, Rosetown; 16. Matt Speckman, Sleepy Eye, Minn.; 17. Rocky Alexander, Estevan; 18. Stefan Klym, Weyburn; 19. Sterling LaBatte, Weyburn; 20. Chris Ellis, Minot, N.D.; 21. Beau Deschamp, Bottineau, N.D.; 22. Cody Nelson, Kenmare, N.D.; 23. Justin Striefel, Minot, N.D.; 24. Scott Yale, Minot, N.D.1st heat (top three) – 1. Scholpp; 2. Jake Nelson; 3. Mann. 2nd heat – 1. Zevenbergen; 2. Bren­dan LaBatte; 3. Burke. 3rd heat – 1. Flory; 2. Daae; 3. Swallers. 4th heat – 1. Wichman; 2. Klym; 3. Yale.1st “B” feature (top six) – 1. Durward; 2. Misner; 3. Swanson; 4. Davidson; 5. Cody Nelson; 6. Alexander. 2nd “B” feature – 1. Speckman; 2. Ellis; 3. Striefel; 4. Lunderby; 5. Sterling LaBatte; 6. Deschamp.30last_img read more

Read More
Syracuse defense responds to challenge, stifles potent West Virginia offense in Pinstripe Bowl victory

first_imgNEW YORK — The anger and motivation fueling the Syracuse defense boiled over on the first play from scrimmage.After a week of hearing about the high-powered West Virginia offense, the unit was fired up, wanting to earn respect and ensure the game didn’t turn into a shootout. SU defensive tackle Deon Goggins greeted the Mountaineers with that message, powering into the backfield before throwing WVU running back Shawne Alston down for a four-yard loss.“I really challenged them to play well and I think they did a good job,” SU head coach Doug Marrone said. “I think right off the bat the first play of the game, Deon Goggins comes through and makes a great play for a tackle for a loss and that set the tempo.”The Syracuse defense played with that same intensity for four quarters, spearheading a 38-14 rout of the Mountaineers in the Pinstripe Bowl at Yankee Stadium on Saturday. It was the Orange’s (8-5) third straight victory over its longtime rival WVU (7-6), who moved to the Big 12 this season. The Mountaineers came into the game boasting the No. 7 scoring offense in the nation – averaging 41.6 points per game – and Marrone said he challenged his defense Friday night to win the battle.That’s just what the group did on Saturday, recording two safeties while limiting star quarterback Geno Smith and the Mountaineers to a season-low 14 points.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“Our theme was three strikes, you’re out,” SU defensive coordinator Scott Shafer said. “You want to earn someone’s respect, I guess you got to knock ’em out three times, and that was our focus.”Shafer said that became the focus when SU learned it would take on its old rival in the bowl game. He said his players were ready to get on the field when Marrone delivered the challenge at the hotel on Friday.Smith entered the game with 40 touchdowns compared to six interceptions to go along with a 71.4 completion percentage. His top receivers, Tavon Austin and Stedman Bailey, combined for 2,760 yards receiving and 35 touchdowns.By Saturday, Goggins and his teammates were sick of all the hype surrounding the Mountaineers’ offense – a unit they had bested two years in a row in a pair of wins.“We all heard about West Virginia’s offense versus our offense like our defense didn’t play good games, like we didn’t get stops when we needed to over the course of the season,” SU defensive tackle Jay Bromley said. “We had a chip on our shoulders on defense because we knew that we wanted to perform versus this team.”Goggins’ big play to start the day set the tone as the Orange held WVU scoreless in the first quarter. Then, the defense erased running back Jerome Smith’s failure to get into the end zone at the goal line midway through the second quarter with a safety on the next play.Syracuse called a blitz that sent safety Durell Eskridge flying in from the right side. Linebackers Siriki Diabate and Cameron Lynch then arrived, one from the middle and the other from the outside, to take down Smith for the sack.“When we called the play, I was like, ‘Alright, this is my opportunity for me to make a difference in this game, make my mark on this game,’” Diabate said. “And that’s what I did.”The Orange led 5-0 and added a touchdown to take a 12-0 lead before West Virginia finally broke through with a touchdown pass to Bailey less than four minutes before the half.The wide receiver’s 32-yard score was one of the few big plays for the Mountaineers that day. He would find the end zone again late in the third quarter, but WVU never threatened again as SU padded its cushion.The defense was relentless and opportunistic. It erased an SU turnover in the second quarter on the very next play when Brandon Sharpe powered through WVU offensive lineman Quinton Spain to force a fumble. Sharpe pushed back another lineman – this time Nick Kindler in the third quarter – to force Smith to panic in the end zone before chucking the ball into the ground for an intentional grounding penalty resulting in Syracuse’s second safety.The Orange led by 21 with just more than a minute to play in the third quarter.And as Shafer made his way from the coach’s box to the field, his players greeted him with their motto of “three strikes and you’re out.” The motto built on an anger that motivated them turned into a victory cry punctuating a brilliant performance.Said Shafer: “At the end of the day, 11 men playing their a*ses off for one another was the difference.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on December 30, 2012 at 12:57 am Contact Ryne: [email protected]center_img Related Stories Gallery: Syracuse romps past West Virginia in snowy Pinstripe Bowl, 38-14SNOW PLOW: Syracuse dominates West Virginia on the ground to win Pinstripe Bowl for 2nd time in 3 yearsSU fans share their Pinstripe Bowl experiences through social mediaCohen: Pinstripe Bowl victory completes remarkable, year-long change of fortunes for Marrone, Syracuse programlast_img read more

Read More
Future looks bright for Mich-e-ke-wis Park

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisThe city of Alpena has it’s eyes on Mich–e–ki–wis Park for new additions and construction in the future to help bring more people back to the park.At Monday’s city council meeting, the council voted to hire the Northeast Michigan Council of Government to update the 14 year old plan for Mich–e–ki–wis. The organization will gather community input and survey results.They will take their findings and put together a list of plausible ideas for the park.NEMCOG will begin their work in January and aim to have a final plan for the park in fall of 2019. Current plans for the park include ideas like an ice rink, ice climbing tower, a winter theatre, disc golf course, and picnic shelter.AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThis Tags: alpena, Mich-e-ke-wis Park, Northeast Michigan Council of Government, Public Input, SurveyContinue ReadingPrevious Woman Shows ‘Holiday Kindness’ to Struggling MotherNext ‘Season of Light’ at Besser wraps up for the holidayslast_img read more

Read More
The White Tower Melbourne finds a new home

first_imgA multi-faceted community project was gifted to the City of Melbourne on Sunday 27 November, 2016, during the festival for the 32nd anniversary celebrations of the Sister City relationship between Melbourne and Thessaloniki at Federation Square.The replica was created thanks to an initiative of Thessaloniki Association ‘The White Tower’, established in 1961 by a handful of migrants in Melbourne.‘The White Tower Melbourne’ is a replica of the White Tower, Thessaloniki’s most famous landmark, meticulously decorated by 8,000 white laurels, the symbol of highest status and an emblem of prosperity and fame. These flowers were crocheted by ladies in Melbourne’s local community as well as ladies in Athens and Thessaloniki.As of last week, Melbourne’s flower-covered White Tower stands proudly in the foyer of the Greek Centre in Lonsdale Street. This is the first leg of the replica’s tour of honour to the various venues around Melbourne. “It was always my intention that the tower be located, for short periods, at local venues, primarily ones which hosted workshops. It will go to various schools, community halls and will ultimately be housed in a museum or gallery. Originally it was created as a community project, but in the end it has become a major work of art,” Christina Despoteris, former manager and coordinator of the project, told Neos Kosmos.“I thank Bill Papasteriadis, Costas Markos and all at the Greek Community of Melbourne who have embraced the project and have understood from the outset the importance and the significance of such a major project. The tower will remain and stand proudly during the Greek Festival on 25 and 26 February for all the community to admire,” she added.Ms Despoteris has recently been appointed to the Sister Cities Australia (SCA) board as an executive member. SCA is the national organisation responsible for the promotion of the relationship of sister cities that will be responsible for the tower’s tour, its placement and ultimately, its permanent home. Facebook Twitter: @NeosKosmos Instagramlast_img read more

Read More