Earth Day at 50: Climate experts say we can learn from COVID-19 crisis

first_img“Already in China they’re seeing a resurgence in levels so we don’t want to be too optimistic because we need to concretely think about ways that will change the way we operate,” Homsy said, in reference to areas of China that have lifted stay at home orders. “If we start thinking about creative ways of doing our work people can start working one day a week from home and that’s a twenty percent drop in travel,” he said. “NASA has used their satellites to look at the whole northeastern United States and the drop in vehicle emissions has dramatically dropped nitrogen dioxide emissions by a third,” said George Homsy, Director of the Sustainable Communities Program at Binghamton University. Professor Homsy stresses that he feels if we can come together to fight COVID-19, we can come together to fight climate change the same way. Homsy says the positive changes aren’t just something to marvel at, but an opportunity to make permanent changes. Homsy says that by learning from some of the changes we have made in response to COVID-19, we can not only preserve some of the positive impacts we’ve seen on the environment, but build on them. center_img Adam Flint, director of clean energy programs at Binghamton Regional Sustainability Coalition says while lifestyle changes are critical, the government also needs to learn from the COVID-19 crisis. “The community has come together in a fantastic way but I think what we’ve also learned is that it is essential that the public sector and government play a role in this,” he said. “Getting involved with groups that are working to change how this country functions at the same time is an essential part of this.” (WBNG) — With social distancing measures in effect you may have noticed less cars on the road and less noise coming from local highways. Experts say it’s not your imagination. “In this situation there is huge tragedy in the loss of life but there are but there are some silver linings we can look at in terms of air pollution and more neighborhood connection, more community connection,” he said.last_img read more

Read More