Month: June 2021

Geoff Cross to start for Scotland

first_imgScott Lawson, Euan Murray, Richie Vernon, Alasdair Strokosch, Mike Blair, Dan Parks, Nick De LucaTickets for Scotland v Italy are still on sale! They start at £15 (students/under-18s) and £30 (adults). You can buy online at www.scottishrugby.org or on the 24-hour hotline 0844 335 3933 until 12 midnight on Friday. Tickets can also be bought in person from the Ticket Centre at Murrayfield, open 9am-8pm til Friday. There are no ticket sales on match days. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Edinburgh’s Geoff Cross has been brought in to Scotland’s starting XV as they take on Italy in the last round of the Six Nations on Saturday at Murrayfield. The 28-year-old prop is making his first international start for two years and winning his fifth cap, replacing Moray Low, who has been dropped from the 22. Euan Murray, who has been unavailable for selection for the last two rounds as he refuses to play in Sunday matches on religious grounds, is named on the bench in the battle of the wooden spoon.Kelly Brown is recovering well from his collision with England’s Matt Banahan on Sunday, and is named at No 8 alongside Nathan Hines at 6 and John Barclay at 7 in an unchanged back row.Head coach Andy Robinson said: “We have chosen Geoff at tight-head prop as he made a good impact when he was introduced on Sunday in both setpiece and open play.“We have been watching Geoff’s performances very closely since the A international win against the Irish at Netherdale back in January and he fully deserves this chance.”Robinson also reiterated his team’s determination to record their first win of the year against an Italian side on a high after their victory over France. He continued: “We know from our own experience that Italy are formidable opponents, and our focus this week is on stepping up our performance on our home soil and producing a hard-nosed, complete 80-minute display that the players are capable of delivering and that will give our supporters something to cheer.”center_img Scotland team to face Italy: Chris Paterson; Max Evans, Joe Ansbro, Sean Lamont, Simon Danielli; Ruaridh Jackson, Rory Lawson; Allan Jacobsen, Ross Ford, Geoff Cross, Richie Gray, Al Kellock (captain), Nathan Hines, John Barclay, Kelly Brown.Replacements:last_img read more

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Win a signed England shirt – Exclusive to Morrisons

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Lewis Moody will be at the fulcrum of England’s World Cup campaign this autumn. So to get you in the mood for the tournament Rugby World has teamed up with Morrisons to offer you the chance to win an England shirt signed by the flanker.We have two shirts to give away in this competition, exclusively for Morrisons customers.All you have to do to have a chance of winning one of these prized pieces of memorabilia is tell us:1. Against which country did Lewis Moody make his England debut in 2001?2. What was the score when England played Scotland at Twickenham in the 2011 RBS 6 Nations? Once you have your answer email [email protected] Please include the address of the Morrisons store in which you bought your copy of Rugby World in your entry.You must complete your entry by Monday 5 September 2011. Normal IPC Media rules apply – see below. The editor’s decision is final.center_img Terms and ConditionsThis competition is open to all readers except employees and their families from IPC Media Ltd, Rugby World’s printers, and companies associated with the competition. Only one entry is permitted per household. You MUST provide a day-time phone number with your entry. No purchase necessary. Prize must be accepted as offered. There can be no alternative awards, cash or otherwise. In the unlikely event of a prize being unavailable, Rugby World reserves the right to offer an alternative prize of equal or greater value. Proof of posting cannot be accepted as proof of delivery. No responsibility can be accepted for entries that are lost, delayed or damaged in the post. No correspondence can be entered into and no entry returned. The Editor’s decision is final. If space allows, results may be published in a future issue. Entry implies acceptance of these rules. While every effort is made to ensure prize details are correct at time of going to press, Rugby World can’t be held responsible for incorrect prize details supplied by sponsors. Winners must be prepared to cooperate with publicity arising as a result of winning a prize, and their contact details may be passed on to the competition sponsor. The shirts cannot be sold on – for clarification, email [email protected] See rugbyworld.com for details of winners. Promoter: Rugby World, IPC Media, Ninth Floor, Blue Fin Building, 110 Southwark Street, London, SE1 0SU.last_img read more

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French focus: Top 14

first_img“My wife and I have all our family over there,” explained Freshwater after the Bayonne match. “And I want my two youngest daughters, Ella and Aurelie, to become bi-lingual like their elder sister, and not to become like their dad, who talks French like a Spanish cow!”It’s more than 20 years since Freshwater played for New Zealand Schoolboys against their Welsh counterparts, before going on to win honours for the NZ Under-21 side. He subsequently moved to England (where his dad lived before going to sea and eventually settling in Wellington) and made his Leicester debut in 1995. It was another ten years before he won his first England cap, against Samoa at Twickenham, a debut that was long overdue in the eyes of many front-row experts.Now, as he prepares to be put out to grass, Freshwater can look back with pride over a career in which, while he might have talked French like a Spanish cow, he scrummed like a New Zealand bull. BARCELONA, SPAIN – APRIL 09: Perry Freshwater the Perpigan prop who scored the final try celebrates after his teams victory during the Heineken Cup quarter final match between Perpignan and Toulon at the Olympic Stadium on April 9, 2011 in Barcelona, Spain. (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images) Freshwater: An end of a French eraAn end of an era is approaching in Perpignan and the fans are getting teary at the prospect. After nine seasons loosehead prop Perry Freshwater is retiring at the end of the season and his loss will be immeasurable to the Catalan club, writes Gavin Mortimer.The New Zealand-born Englishman arrived at Perpignan in 2003 after eight years with Leicester Tigers and it was with the French club that Freshwater won all his ten caps – including two appearances during England’s memorable 2007 World Cup campaign.Perry, who turns 39 in July, has finally surrendered to Old Father Time after a career in which he won two Heineken Cup titles with the Tigers and was a member of the first Perpignan side to lift the Top 14 crown for 54 years. At both clubs the Wellington-born front rower became something of a cult hero, earning his own fan club during his days at Welford Road (‘The Perry Freshwater Appreciation Society”) and gaining folk status in the Mediterreanan city. As France and Perpignan prop Nicolas Mas told me in an interview last year: “Perry is more Catalan than English now!  He’s a great example of a player who’s come to here and become one of the family. He’s played in New Zealand and Leicester but he’s most at home here, and we’re proud to have him.”Freshwater’s last home appearance for Perpignan will be in two weeks’ time against Lyon but the big man’s certainly going out with a bang, helping the club recently to resounding victories over Bayonne (47-9) and Toulouse (25-10), wins that have pulled Perpignan clear of the relegation zone. After the thrashing of Bayonne the Perpignan fans saluted Freshwater as he and his teammates did a lap of honour, chanting “Perry! Perry”. It was recognition of his commitment to the club during his time at the club  in which he’s made over 120 appearances including 22 this season. Freshwater for his part will be sorry to say au revoir to Perpignan’s passionate rugby supporters. “To be saluted like that, it’s a big honour,” confessed Freshwater, who is returning to New Zealand with his young family LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

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Jonny Wilkinson eager to tour Australia with the Lions

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS 7 Jul 2001: Jonny Wilkinson of British Lions is tackled by George Gregan of Australia during the British and Irish Lions tour match against Australia played at the Colonial Stadium in Melbourne, Australia. Australia won the match 35 – 14. Mandatory Credit: Dave Rogers /Allsport Wilkinson’s history with the Lions has been mixed, with a narrow Series defeat in 2001 followed up by injury a humbling whitewash by New Zealand in 2005. Injury prevented his selection for the 2009 tour to South Africa, leaving him with a sense of unfinished business when it comes to the iconic red jersey.At 33, age is not on his side and his absence from the upcoming November Internationals and next year’s Six Nations will deny him an opportunity to prove he can still cut it at Test level due to his international retirement.Another factor that could hinder his selection is the same issue that has surrounded Wales prop Gethin Jenkins, with the Top 14 Final being played on the same day that the Lions face the Barbarians in Hong Kong. Toulon are currently second favourites to win the Top 14 outright and having recruited the likes of Bakkies Botha, Chris Masoe and Delon Armitage over the summer, they have never had a better chance to win the Bouclier de Brennus after finishing as runners-up last season. Hungry for Wallabies: Jonny Wilkinson said playing for the Lions would be impossible to turn downby Ben ColesJONNY WILKINSON has declared himself available for selection for the British & Irish Lions tour to Australia in 2013, if Warren Gatland comes calling.The Toulon fly-half retired from international rugby with England following the 2011 Rugby World Cup, but has continued his fine form in the south of France as Toulon bid to win a first Top 14 title since 1992. After 12 years with Newcastle Falcons that were littered with serious injuries, Wilkinson has produced some of his best rugby on the Côte d’Azur surrounded by world-class international talent in an environment where he clearly thrives.Still haunted by defeat in the 2001 Lions series with Australia, the chance to settle unfinished business with the Wallabies is an alluring prospect for England’s record points-scorer.“There’s no way I could say no. It’s such a fabulous thing in terms of what it represents. It doesn’t matter where you’ve come from, it’s enormous.” What will matter come the end of the season is whether Wilkinson is a better option than the current fly-halves available. Johnny Sexton, Rhys Priestland, Toby Flood and Owen Farrell are all contenders to fill the 10 shirt against Australia, whilst James Hook and Greig Laidlaw are outside bets.By impressing in the Heineken Cup with Toulon, Wilkinson can put himself in contention and keep his hopes alive, but it is an enormous challenge. His talent and work ethic remain outstanding, but time is not on his side. If selected however, the Lions tour could be the perfect denouement to a magnificent career.last_img read more

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Lions watch: Movers and shakers for Australia 2013

first_imgLONDON, ENGLAND – NOVEMBER 17: England captain Chris Robshaw speaks to his players during the QBE International match between England and Australia at Twickenham Stadium on November 17, 2012 in London, England. (Photo by Stu Forster/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS 8. Jamie Heaslip –Another back rower with leadership qualities, Heaslip is comfortable with the ball and was born to take a tap-and-pass. He would be a dependable and popular selection.Okay, there’s still plenty of rugby to be played, who would you pick if you were in Warren Gatland’s shoes? Cheers!: But will Warren Gatland be drowning his sorrows, or raising a pint celebration after the Lions Tests?By Alan DymockHANGING-OFF cliff faces, dodging bullets and zip-wiring down air vents may seem like a Mission Impossible, but even Ethan Hunt would think twice about taking on Warren Gatland’s Lions coaching job at present after two weekends of chastening Test rugby for the Northern Hemisphere.If there was a Lions’ selection process underway right now, there would be few ‘bankers’ available to Gatland and his staff, but that’s not to say over the next six months certainties for the plane will emerge. There is a team of Wallaby-beaters among the Home Nations, the tough bit for Gatland is finding it. Still onwards, it will get better. No, scratch that, it must get better.So here goes, my Lions XV on current form…15. Leigh Halfpenny – Wales’ Mr Consistency in an inconsistent side, Halfpenny has kicked and run himself into the ground for the cause. The Cardiff Blues full-back offers a running threat, as well as being a genuine Test class, 80% kicker.14. Charlie Sharples – Okay, so he’s just been harshly dropped but the Gloucester wing has impressed with his work rate, sickeningly swift set of hooves and nose for the try-line. There’s more to come from the Gloucester flyer.13. Fergus McFadden – Of late, we’ve only seen the Leinster man on the wing, however, he is a 13 to his bootlaces and can burrow with the best of them. He was one of the stand-out performers against a limited Fiji side. 12. Manu Tuilagi –We all know what Tuilagi offers. Crash, bang and wallop before gluing a celebratory ‘L’ to his forehead every time he scores. At 21, he’s still raw and his distribution skills have been questioned. He may even be shunted onto the wing to further his education, but such go-forward cannot be ignored. 11. Tim Visser – You simply cannot see past the Flying, er, Scotsman who scored a brace against the All Blacks. He is Scotland’s sharpest weapon and fast making a name for himself on the international stage as a player of genuine class.Flyer: Visser has shone in a Scottish jersey10. Jonny Sexton –Toby Flood and his drop-handle moustache may feel a little hard done by here, but Sexton is in the box seat by virtue of being the most consistent option available. He will set his jaw and just get on with it. And if the boot fails, you’ve always got Halfpenny as back up. 9. Danny Care – Pocket-sized he may be, but he isn’t exactly facing a goliath in the peerless Will Genia. Care brings quick service and zip around the base of the scrum. He’s also not lacking in confidence, which is no bad thing against the Aussies.1. Cian Healy – He certainly looks the part, all brimstone and fire and is improving rapidly as a scrummager. He has overtaken an out-of-sorts Gethin Jenkins who is suffering from a lack of game-time with Toulon. 2. Sean Cronin – With Rory Best and Dylan Hartley crocked, let’s pencil in Sean Cronin to throw the arrows. Why? Because he is dynamic and his set-piece is sturdier than Ross Ford’s. 3. Dan Cole – Doesn’t seem much of an argument here. Can Adam Jones come back from his latest injury to challenge? Cole is Mr Dependable and probably the most important person in the starting line-up. 4. Richie Gray – Scotland’s only genuine world-class player, Gray has the engine of a Panzer tank and the roof of a Miami nightclub. However, he did knock himself out trying to carry Scotland against South Africa. To be treated with extreme care over the next six months. 5. Mike McCarthy –This McCarthy trial seems to have gone pretty well. He hits like a coffee enema and is just as refreshing for an Ireland team that seems to routinely offer 10-year contracts for its locks. A breath of fresh-air in a stilted Irish pack.Key man: Robshaw leads from the front 6. Chris Robshaw – Is he a six? Is he a seven? Is he a ‘fetcher’? Well, he may not be the full package for any of the above, but he has a prodigious work rate and innate leadership skills that make players think they can perform beyond their ability. A rare quality. 7. Sam Warburton – Another leader, and a destructive physical force able to cope with David Pocock at the breakdown. Yes, his form may have dipped from its World Cup plateau, but you’d be foolish forget his virtues. Expect him to be purring come Lions time.last_img read more

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Five things we learned in world rugby in January

first_imgStill got it: Matt Giteau is still, pound for pound, one of the world’s best players (Pic Action Images)His footwork, running angles and distribution are immaculate and have elevated him to the undisputed puppet master of Toulon and the Top 14 – in fact he’s more than the puppet master he is Jim Henson. Whilst we all understand the desire and need to keep domestic players in domestic leagues, preventing Giteau from playing at the World Cup is real loss for rugby. If I could release one player from their test nation’s restrictions on selecting overseas players, Giteau would get the vote every time.Feeling sorry for Stuart LancasterIt is rare to hear a Welshman sympathising with English rugby. This paragraph alone could see me wrapped in gaffa tape and frog-marched to the English border. But it is difficult not to empathise with Lancaster and the injuries that are blighting his Six Nations and World Cup preparations. Excluding the All Blacks, no team in the game could cope with losing so many first team players. Currently the list stands at between ten and twelve players – depending on the daily fitness updates. Even by rugby’s standards this is an extraordinary injury list. This is the type of mass injuring that unfolds on GTA 5 after a rampage with a baseball bat.Problem solver: Stuart Lancaster has a glut of injuries ahead of the Wales game (Pic Action Images)Even without an injury list the England coach had a number of combinations that were still very much undecided -particularly in the centres. Losing Brad Barritt, Luther Burrell, Kyle Eastmond and Manu Tuilagi, for varying periods, isn’t going to help that issue. Add Owen Farrell’s lengthy lay off to that list and Lancaster could be playing the entire Six Nations with a new 10/12/13 axis for each game. Stuart Lancaster will learn a lot about his squad during the next few weeks.Is rugby clothing antiquated?Over the past decade, rugby has become a genuinely professional game. The improvements in administration, strength and conditioning, and player welfare are staggering. Yet for some reason the clothing that players wear on the field hasn’t really changed during the last 80 years. Yes, the shirts are more aerodynamic and we now have grip strips and compression layers etc. However, it is strange that players essentially wear the same clothing during May and they do in the middle of January. The temperature differential between the recent European fixtures played in January and the upcoming World Cup warm up fixtures could be 12-15 degrees Celsius – yet players still stroll out in shorts, socks and a jersey for both. Final walk: Adam Jones’ Wales career finished prematurely in most eyes Parky: Rugby players wear the same clothing whatever the temperature (Pic Action Images)Kelly Slater, the surfer, doesn’t wear the same clothing at Pipeline as he does at Mavericks. Professional golfers don’t wear the same clothing in the winter as the summer – so why do rugby players? As any back will tell you, waiting around for five scrum resets can be a long, cold grind where the extremities, particularly the fingers, can become numb. Yet 10 seconds later they will be expected to catch a zipped spiral pass with fingers that are as brittle as a Cadbury’s flake. It would be interesting to see if the ‘heat pads’ used by professional golfers could be slotted into the back pockets of players shorts – allowing them a place to keep their hands warm and malleable during long breaks in play. Just a thought.Click here March 2015 to find out what’s in the March edition of Rugby World magazine – in shops now! Adam Jones retiresJanuary saw Adam Jones retire from test rugby and take his place alongside the grandees of Welsh rugby. He has had a fine career, featuring 95 caps for Wales and five for the British & Irish Lions. But whilst Jones’ caps are impressive his career can’t simply be measured in numbers. ‘Bomb’ introduced genuine stability to Wales’ set piece and ended a decade during which the Welsh scrum had been regarded, globally, as a weakness.For eight years Adam Jones WAS the Welsh scrum and delivered a solidity of platform usually reserved for structures that sit amidst the North Sea. All three of Wales’ recent Grand Slams were built around the Welsh tight head and his scrummaging allowed a generation of Welsh backs and backrow forwards to flourish. This week Warren Gatland said that Jones’ retirement had come as a surprise. Although I’d imagine that Jones’ was more surprised when he found that the third choice tight head at his club was selected ahead of him for the Welsh squad. A baffling selection that ended a superb career.Commercial and political pressure is hurting Sam Burgess’ developmentJanuary revealed exactly how much pressure Sam Burgess is under since his move from the NRL. Burgess is one of those unfortunate victims of professional sport where the commercial/ political pressure facing a player is as extreme as the playing pressure. The responsibility on his shoulders is massive, and exceeds anything that he can ‘military press’ in the gym. Despite a slow start to his union career, which is to be expected considering he has never played it before, an underlying commercial subtext means that Burgess has been fast tracked through union at a pace that simply doesn’t make sense.Learning curve: Sam Burgess still has some way to go in Union (Pic Action Images)Burgess’ progression is beyond ‘fast tracking’ and is verging on ‘Millennium Falcon’ tracking. 15 years ago code jumpers had a season in which to learn the game and would slowly move from the reserves into the first team and then to test level – if good enough. Sam Burgess however has gone straight into Bath’s first team, into the England Saxons’ squad and is now going to train with the full England squad – after a matter of months. Bath and England have a lot invested in Burgess. Let’s hope he doesn’t become the next Benji Marshall.England are missing out on Armitage. World rugby is missing out on GiteauIn the UK, Steffon Armitage receives the headlines for his exclusion from test rugby due to playing outside his domestic league – he’s made a few other headlines in January too… However it is the exclusion of Matt Giteau, from the Wallabies team, which is more detrimental to rugby. Giteau, when injury free, is arguably the best player in the world. Although you’ll rarely hear his name mentioned in that context, as without test status many simply forget that he exists.center_img The month of January threw up a number of talking points, none bigger than Adam Jones’ retirement, Sam Burgess’ progression and a bonafide England injury crisis LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

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Flash sale: Subscribe from £17.49 and get a pair of Gilbert Tour Trousers!

first_img TAGS: Highlight Check out details and links for Rugby World’s phenomenal special subscription offer, including a free gift As we are feeling generous here at Rugby World magazine, we are giving you the wonderful opportunity to join us as a subscriber from just £17.49, saving a massive 42% in the full price when you subscribe.If that wasn’t enough to catch your eye, we will also send you a pair of Gilbert Tour Trousers as a welcome gift!You may be a faithful reader of Rugby World and buy each issue at the supermarket or newsagent, or you might dip your toe in and out, perhaps buying it whenever you have a long journey. The question you may ask yourself is: “Why should I become a Rugby World subscriber?” Well, in addition to the unrivalled access to the players and coaches behind the thrilling clashes that define the sport of international and elite club rugby union, as well as dispatches from the thriving men’s and women’s grass-roots scene and images that capture the excitement and passion that define our sport, here’s what’s in it for you as a subscriber:You won’t miss a single issue of your favourite magazine – we send it to your home every month with no effort required on your part!As a subscriber you pay less that you would at the newsagent. You will only have to pay £2.92 for each issue, with the lower price guaranteed to you for a minimum of 12 months.You will get access to our iPad/iPhone editions of the magazine thrown in at no extra cost and you can download your first digital version of the magazine right away.We will also send you a fantastic welcome gift!Why not give the world’s best-selling rugby magazine a try? Subscribe today with our half price offer! LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

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Who is Chris Harris: Ten things you should know about the Scotland centre

first_img4. He played almost 50 times for Tynedale RFC between the ages of 19 and 24. The Corbridge-based team played in National League One – the third tier of English rugby – while Harris was there.5. Newcastle Falcons first paid attention to the centre when he appeared in their 2014 Premiership Rugby 7s squad. He managed to score a try in each of their group games. He then became dual-registered with Championship side Rotherham Titans. 9. One of his hobbies in international camp is learning the guitar – he’s trying to follow the lead of guitar expert and centre partner Duncan Taylor.10. He’s also massively into barbecuing – and will do it in any weather! Who is Chris Harris: Ten things should know about the Scotland centre Perennially one of the most underrated players in the Gallagher Premiership, Chris Harris’s outstanding form was rewarded by a call-up from Warren Gatland for the British & Irish Lions 2021 squad.Related: Inside the Mind of Chris HarrisA brilliant defender, who is also capable of running extremely intelligent lines, here are ten more facts about Harris.Ten things you should know about Chris Harris1. Chris Harris was born on 28 December 1990 in Carlisle, England. He grew up in the town, attending Trinity School, and playing for Carlisle RFC.2. Harris qualifies for Scotland through his grandmother, who is from Edinburgh.3. Harris was not highly-rated when he arrived at Northumbria University – they placed him in the 3rd XV. His nickname was ‘some gas’, because he was quicker than a centre partner named ‘no gas’! Chris Harris playing for Gloucester in the Gallagher Premiership (Getty Images) 6. Saracens are a tough opponent to make a Premiership debut against – but Harris scored a double when he made his top-flight bow! It came the day before his 24th birthday.Chris Harris on his Scotland debut against Wales in 2018 (Getty Images)7. His international debut came against Wales in Cardiff back in 2018. Unfortunately it was a tough occasion for the Scotland team, as they lost 34-7.8. Gloucester came in to sign the centre in the summer of 2019 – and Harris credits the West Country club with developing his attacking game.center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Get some insight into Gloucester’s defensive lynchpin, who made his way up through the league pyramid Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

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NCC ‘profoundly disturbed’ by events leading to Trayvon Martin’s death

first_img Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC May 30, 2012 at 12:19 pm There is a real “rush to judgement” taking place here. We have no evidence that George Zimmermann’s actions were motivated by racial prejudice or racial stereotyping or that the police were so motivated when they released Zimmermann. What I see is people like Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton trying to make political capital out of Martin’s death. For the leaders of the Protestant churches to jump into this situation, when all of the facts have not been determined, is deplorable. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Racial Justice & Reconciliation Rector Tampa, FL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Hopkinsville, KY Posted Mar 26, 2012 Featured Events An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Rector Columbus, GA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Comments (1) Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Albany, NY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Submit a Press Release In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Martinsville, VA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Smithfield, NC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest NCC ‘profoundly disturbed’ by events leading to Trayvon Martin’s death Ecumenical & Interreligious, An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET center_img Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Press Release Service Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Shreveport, LA [National Council of Churches] The President and staff leader of the National Council of Churches said today they are “profoundly disturbed” by the killing of Trayvon Martin, an African American youth.President Kathryn M. Lohre and Interim General Secretary Clare J. Chapman also expressed concern about the racial stereotyping and endemic racism that sparks confrontations of the kind that led to Martin’s death, allegedly at the hands of a neighborhood watch volunteer.In a joint statement during the annual Ecumenical Advocacy Days gathering in the Washington area, Lohre and Chapman said they prayed a thorough investigation of the incident will be a “first step toward discarding historic structural patterns that have caused us to dehumanize one another, and that have placed millions of our sisters and brothers, persons of color, at risk in our society — in their homes, their neighborhoods and in public places.”The full text of the statement follows:The National Council of Churches is profoundly disturbed by the tragic events surrounding the killing on February 26 of 17 year-old Trayvon Martin in Sanford, Florida.We send our deepest sympathies to the family and friends of Trayvon. We sadly acknowledge the tragic reality that exists for young men of color and their families who, because of their appearance, fear they will be victims of violence at the hands of police and others. The stereotypes held by police against persons of color, and held by persons of color against police in response – have engendered a dangerous – if not deadly – reality throughout our country.In this case, the police have said Florida law makes it unnecessary for police to investigate the shooting of Trayvon, resulting in unprecedented demonstrations of anger in the U.S. and around the world. Clearly, this tragedy has been compounded by unexamined stereotypes on both sides, and especially by the systemic racism that is pervasive throughout the very fabric of our society infecting our institutions and individuals alike.We do not have all the facts about this terrible incident and it is impossible to know what was going on in the mind of the alleged shooter. But all of us – especially those who are white – must engage in urgent self-examination about the ways we react to persons we regard as “other.” And beyond our personal responses, we must recommit ourselves to root out the endemic institutional racism, both in society and in the church that threatens our ability to live in safety and in community.We welcome signs that systems of justice are moving to fully investigate the tragic killing of Trayvon Martin. We pray these efforts will be a first step toward discarding historic structural patterns that have caused us to dehumanize one another, and that have placed millions of our sisters and brothers, persons of color, at risk in our society — in their homes, their neighborhoods and in public places.We pray for God’s help as we seek to bridge the divisions that separate us from one another. May God forgive us and open all our hearts to one another. Rector Knoxville, TN Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Tags Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Bath, NC Rector Collierville, TN Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit a Job Listing Rector Washington, DC Comments are closed. The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Paul Spengler says: Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit an Event Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJlast_img read more

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‘Companioning’ on both sides of the grave

first_img‘Companioning’ on both sides of the grave Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Jobs & Calls November 1, 2012 at 5:10 pm I am overjoyed to read this beautiful story of witness to our homeless brothers and sisters. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA [Episcopal News Service] Brother Ron Fender will spend Nov. 1 and Nov. 2, All Saints and All Souls Days, commemorating Chattanooga’s homeless and unclaimed dead, first by decorating their graves with fall flowers and, a day later, with dinner and Eucharist.While Episcopal Church commemoration of the dead is a longstanding tradition, Fender’s is among a growing number of outreach ministries that “companion” the poor, the homeless, the marginalized and alone, on both sides of the grave.As outreach case manager for the Chattanooga Community Kitchen, Fender, a monk in the Episcopal Brotherhood of St. Gregory, offers a range of services to the homeless, including keeping vigil with the dying and also burying them.The ministry emerged “soon after I came here,” he recalled during a recent telephone interview from his office. “One of the homeless men collapsed here at the kitchen and stopped breathing. We did CPR, got him to the hospital and they ventilated him. But after some hours the doctors came and asked me if he had family.“I knew he didn’t because he told me many times that he was alone in the world and he was concerned there’d be no one to bury him,” Fender recalled. “The doctor said, ‘we really need to let him go’. They started disconnecting everything. I stayed with him till it was over.With that death he realized that “I didn’t want any of them to die alone and, even if they died alone, I did not want them to go unburied without some recognition of who they were and the fact that I’ve loved them and that God has accepted them into his arms.”That was 10 years ago. His ministry has evolved so that the coroner’s office notifies him when a body is unclaimed. The county donates a grave; local funeral homes provide their services and a cardboard casket.He eulogizes the dead “and I try to personalize it,” Fender said. “I do always assure those who are gathered there that that person is no longer homeless. That person is at home. We are the homeless ones, but that that person is no longer homeless.”On any given night, Fender believes “there are between 300 and 500 people sleeping outside,” he said. “Chattanooga has one emergency or drop-in shelter, and it has 42 beds for men and 12 for women, so a large number of our people are sleeping outside.”Sacred ‘vigiling’ in Los AngelesIn Los Angeles, a three-fold collaboration of the Rev. Sarah Nichols, Chapman University professor Don Gabard, and Dr. Pamelyn Close, has trained almost 100 volunteers for By Your Side, a program designed “to meet people where they are by serving as compassionate companions to those who are dying.”Nichols, director of pastoral care for the diocesan Episcopal Communities and Services, said the volunteers offer “the gift of authentic presence” to those in local hospitals, homes, long-term care facilities, their own parishes and communities of influence.“Research shows that companionship and spiritual support are two of the most important desires at the end of life, yet many Americans die alone,” Nichols said in an e-mail to the Episcopal News Service.“When facing the vulnerability of end of life, every human being deserves to have their sacredness affirmed and their spirituality honored through the compassionate presence of another person, in whatever way is meaningful to them,” she added.It is not proselytizing or even about prayer, says Don Gabard, a physical therapist and parishioner at All Saints Church in Pasadena, whose mother’s death and volunteerism helped inspire By Your Side.Six years ago his mother was dying of ovarian cancer in North Carolina and “she made it pretty clear to me that she wanted me to be there,” he recalled during a recent telephone interview with ENS. “I was both filled with sorrow at her death but at the same time so grateful that I could be there.”He also volunteered at the L.A. County-University of Southern California medical center where at least seven percent of the patients are homeless and never have a visitor.What many people really want “is to tell their story,” he said. “They may tell it to you many times but it changes because they’re making meaning of life.”So “there is no formula to this. People have their own unique way of making meaning or finding meaning in their faith, if they have a faith.”Gabard remembered visiting a seven-week-old child. “Her family abandoned her when they found she had a catastrophic illness that was going to take her life,” he recalled.“They couldn’t stand to be there. What we did as volunteers was hold her and sing to her and comfort her like you do with any child. If there are any rights that are inalienable, to be held and loved as a child is certainly one of those.”The volunteers visit those who “are ‘underfamilied,’ have no family, or are young, or in their 80s. It’s just across the board. I can’t predict who or what I’m going to see when I go there.”For two-year By Your Side volunteer Sharon Crandall, a parishioner at the Church of Our Saviour in San Gabriel, California, visiting the dying “has been far more rewarding and transformative than I ever imagined.“I have learned that the best approach is to not have any expectations. Learning to meet people where they are in the dying process has helped me in my relationship to others and in my relationship with God,” she said.“It also gave me the courage and compassion to care for my aunt in her last weeks and my mother-in-law in her last months. Both had the desire to die at home. I was so grateful to be able to share this time with both of them. It is a gift you really have to experience. There are no words to describe the grace of dying.”Hope and angels in DetroitAt 4 p.m. nearly every third Wednesday of each month Carolyn Gamble, senior warden at St. Christopher’s-St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Detroit gathers, along with her 13-year-old granddaughter Kaitlyn and others, at the Perry Funeral Home.They light a candle, read the names of the city’s unclaimed dead, pray and sing.Like Gabard in Los Angeles, Gamble’s involvement grew out of personal experience. Her mother had lived in both New York and in Detroit and “when she died we had services in both places for her,” Gamble said during an Oct. 29 telephone interview.When another parishioner told her of the city’s unclaimed dead in the morgue, “their bodies disposed of with no service, no nothing, it really hit home to me,” she said. “It was strange to me, I felt somebody needed to do something.”The funeral home provides the space and the names of the unclaimed. The church has offered nondenominational services since 2008, according to the Rev. Deborah-Semon Scott, St. Christopher’s-St. Paul’s rector. In that time “I’ve lost count of how many folks we’ve had services for,” she said. “It’s in the thousands.”She has officiated at burials for babies and centenarians alike. There are usually no ashes or bodies present. Instead, a candle is lit and there is a single long-stemmed white rose bearing a tag with name and date of birth and death, if known, for each individual being commemorated. At various services, there have been as few as 30 candles and roses or as many as 60, she said.“They might have been in a nursing home; sometimes we have services for babies who were miscarried or died at birth or were stillborn,” according to Semon-Scott. “And we also have had services for folk for whom remains were found and they have a date of death as to when they were found. All they can do is say they were male or female and sometimes it’s pretty sketchy. It sounds grisly, but it’s a fact of life.”The ministry began after a former parishioner heard a radio broadcast that Detroit and other major cities were facing backlogs of unclaimed bodies. “He thought how sad it was that one would come into this life and be a part of this kingdom for whatever length of time and be parted as if they had never been, and wasn’t there something that we could do about that,” she said.After the prayers, there are hymns, “something that everyone knows, like ‘Bind us together, Lord,’” she said.“These are human beings created in the image of the creator and all life is sacred for whatever length of time we are given – the good, the bad and the ugly. It needs to celebrated, acknowledged and thanked because they did walk the earth,” she said. “To pass into the night as if you never had been is exceedingly sad.”Although the ministry “has deeply touched the lives of people who have been a part of it” volunteers are few, perhaps because it is misunderstood.“We thought we’d do this once or twice a year,” Gamble recalled. “We just knew it would catch on and others would want to do it also. But, it didn’t. We’ve had no takers.”Semon-Scott agreed. “When I claim this as one of our outreach ministries, as a mission of the church, usually the response from other clergy is ‘oh, that has to be terrible to go and do that.’”Paradoxically, it is anything but, Semon-Scott said. “How could something one would assume is grim have a joyful peace to it? Yet, it does,” she said. “You can walk away and know that it was a good and right thing to do.”Back in Chattanooga, Fender said he buried 26 people last year. “This year so far, it’s only 12, thank God.”The ministry is important “because the connection between us and those who have died remains very strong,” he said. “I think that we are connected eternally through God and when I visit the cemetery and those graves I know that person is standing there with me. Death may end an earthly life but it does not end a being.“We are spiritual beings with an earthly human experience and our connection with them is very strong. I think that as we remember them we know they are looking back on us with love and thanksgiving. I always tell my homeless friends when I visit their grave I will see you again some day.”–The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service. She is based in Los Angeles. Press Release Service In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Martinsville, VA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Shreveport, LA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector Columbus, GA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Comments are closed. Norris Battin says: Comments (2) Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN center_img Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Tampa, FL Rector Bath, NC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit an Event Listing Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Curate Diocese of Nebraska Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Smithfield, NC By Pat McCaughanPosted Nov 1, 2012 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Events martha knight says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Belleville, IL November 1, 2012 at 10:44 am Wonderful story, Pat. It’s just in time for our “Praying Our Goodbyes” service on Sunday at St. Mikes.Thanks,Norris An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME last_img read more

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