Month: January 2021

Clubs able to accept Domer Dollar donations

first_imgThe idea for Domer Dollar Donations originated two years ago when Jain, attempting to collect money for charities as the Center for Social Concerns (CSC) commissioner for his dorm, heard students saying they would give Flex Points or Domer Dollars if they could. “Regardless of whether or not students had cash on them, they felt more willing to give money if it was more convenient for them,” Jain said. In Spring 2009, Jain and the Student Senate Committee developed a proposal. After communicating with Food Services, the Student Activities Office (SAO) and LaFortune Administration, the program is set to begin. “This program will not just be located in front of the elevators in LaFortune,” Jain said. “If the program has a successful start, then maybe more swipe machines for donating will pop up at dining halls, or, in an ideal world, a CSC commissioner or club board member would be able to walk around with a wireless swipe machine and collect donations.” When student groups fill out an SAO request online form for a table in front of the LaFortune elevators, they can select to have the swipe machine, which is similar to the machines at the dining halls. Students can state the amount of money they wish to donate, swipe their card, and be on their way, Jain said.Rachel Roseberry, the Social Concerns chair, used the machine Friday to sell the benefit CD “Head Above Water.”  The profits from the CD go to Student Government’s Global Water Initiative.“The Domer Dollars machine was easy and efficient to use, and it definitely increased our selling potential,” Roseberry said. “Some students were able to purchase the CD who would not have been able to before because they weren’t carrying cash. The machine is a great tool to allow Notre Dame students to give back with convenience, and it will be a great resource for any club that utilizes it.” The elevators in LaFortune are often a prime spot for student organizations to raise funds for charities. However, students have long expressed concern about their ability to donate cash, which few have on hand.  Charlie Jain, a senior in Zahm Hall, found a solution to this problem with a proposal that he calls Domer Dollar Donations. Jain brought up the idea of using Domer Dollars to the CSC social commissioner at the time, and the proposal passed through Student Senate in Fall 2008, Jain said. “The ultimate goal for the program is to better aid the beneficiaries of student clubs,” Jain said. “In doing so, this program will help students act on what they believe by enabling them to give monetary donations to charities, even when students do not usually have much money.”last_img read more

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Run to raise alcohol awareness

first_imgThe residents of Lyons Hall will honor a former Lyonite killed by a drunk driver with its signature event, the Mara Fox Run, on Saturday morning. Lyons Hall president Vivien Devaney said the dorm established the event to educate students about the consequences of driving while drunk. “The run was established as a memorial for Mara, who was killed by a drunk driver during her freshman year [in 1993],” Devaney said. “It’s the culmination of the week when we educate girls about alcohol use and drunk driving.” The 5-k event also raises funds for a scholarship in Fox’s name. “The proceeds go to the Mara Fox Scholarship fund that goes toward any Lyonite who wishes to study in Toledo, Spain, because Mara wanted to study there,” Devaney said. Lyons residents also sold purple hair feathers in the dining halls and LaFortune Student Center this week to benefit the scholarship fund. Sophomore Rebecca Rossi said the run connects current Lyons residents with Fox’s legacy. “The Mara Fox Run is about keeping her spirit alive,” Rossi said. “I feel like I know Mara even though I never met her.” Fox’s parents will have dinner with Lyons residents Friday evening, Rossie said. Freshman Allison McKown purchased a hair feather Wednesday. “I want to participate because it’s a good cause,” McKown said. “I want to raise awareness about drunk driving.” As part of the Mara Fox Week events, Lyons hosted a PILLARS gathering about “Women and Alcohol” on Wednesday night. Freshman Antoinette Chan, who attended the event, said the entire week encourages students to think about all types of wellness. “The run promotes both physical and mental well-being,” Chan said. Freshman Alexa Vega said she was excited to participate in the run Saturday morning. “It’s my first 5-k at Notre Dame, and I get to help a good cause at the same time,” Vega said. Devaney said the race would also feature music and free giveaways for participants. “The music’s supposed to be really good this year, and we have a lot of people participating,” Devaney said. “We encourage people to come out. The race is at 10 a.m. on Saturday, and the registration is at 9 a.m. outside of Lyons. If you participate, you will get a bib for a buy-one, get-one free entrée at Chipotle.” Registration tables for the race are located at both dining halls and in LaFortune Student Center. Runners can also register Saturday morning. “Through the event planned by Lyons Hall and her parents, Mara’s memory lives on,” Devaney said. “Hopefully the weather holds out this year, so that it can be a good event.”last_img read more

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Coccia, Joyce win election runoff

first_imgThe student body voted in favor of a vision focused on “passion, perseverance and people,” electing juniors Alex Coccia and Nancy Joyce as 2013-2014 student body president and vice president Tuesday. Coccia and Joyce received 2,066 of 3,795 votes, or 54.4 percent in the student body election. The pair’s opposition – juniors Dominic Romeo and Philip Hootsmans – received 1,729 votes, or 45.6 percent. 208 students chose to abstain. Coccia, who was accompanied by a number of supporters, attributed his ticket’s victory to its campaign team. “We put together a really good team and we’re proud of everything they’ve done,” he said. “We certainly wouldn’t be here without their help.” Joyce said her ticket’s opposition pushed her and Coccia to campaign harder and improve their communication efforts. “I think we all pushed each other and made [the campaign] better,” she said. “I think in the future they will also continue to push us, to make sure we’re doing what we need to be doing as student body president and vice president.” Coccia, who will take office April 1, said he will use the coming weeks to gain insights from outgoing student body president and vice president Brett Rocheleau and Katie Rose and to build off his support team. “We’re excited to start conversations with [Rocheleau and Rose]. … We’ve built such a strong network of people who we want to have incorporated into student government,” he said. “We’re going to use these next couple of weeks before the transition to get really moving on the ground.” Romeo said the experience of campaigning across campus made the experience worthwhile, win or lose. “It’s been an absolute pleasure having this opportunity to interact with students individually and in groups, to hear their feedback and truly get this whole new picture of Notre Dame as a truly diverse campus in terms of backgrounds, interests and ways of looking at things,” he said. “To gain the support of as many students as we did in such a short time was incredible.” Hootsmans said he was appreciative of students’ willingness to back his ticket’s vision for student government. “Everyone we talked to was extremely open and very supportive of us,” he said. “Getting so many students who wanted us to be president and vice president of this campus was humbling.” Romeo said he and Hootsmans will work to advance their platform outside of student government, although he is unsure how. “One of the big things we wanted to encourage was conversation at every level of this campus,” he said. “How do we do that through an avenue that isn’t student government? We’ll have to examine that, but it’s something we’re passionate about.” Hootsmans expressed his confidence in the winning ticket’s ability to serve the student body. “We do think Coccia-Joyce will do a good job,” he said. “At the end of the day, Notre Dame is stronger for it.” News Editor Kristen Durbin also contributed to this report.last_img read more

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Week parades awkwardness

first_imgNotre Dame’s Gender Relations Center (GRC) and Notre Dame Humor Artists are teaming up to sponsor Notre Dame Awkward Awareness Week to promote acceptance of our awkward sides.“Everything that the Gender Relations Center does is supposed to help Notre Dame students have healthy relationships, with yourself, with others, and with God, “ said sophomore Lucinda Krahl, a peer educator in the GRC.Krahl said students could participate in the “My Awkward Life” Vine-exclusive contest, in which students submit a six-second, non-offensive video to @grcnd to be entered in a contest to win gift cards to local eateries. Also, students can tweet a picture of themselves doing something awkward accompanied by the hashtag #LetsMakeItAwkwardND.According to the Gender Relations website, a wall of awkwardness will be available in both dining halls all week, on which students can share their awkward moments with their peers. Students can also pick up free “Awkward” t-shirts in the dining halls Monday through Thursday during lunch. Students are encouraged to wear their shirts on Friday, according the websiteKrahl said the idea for the movement came from the pressure to be perfect that students experience at Notre Dame.“At Notre Dame, we are all under pressure by others and by ourselves to succeed,” Krahl said. “Sometimes we demand perfectionism, but we’re all human, so we make mistakes. … We’re all awkward.”The week emphasizes embracing the awkwardness that we all share, Krahl said.“Being awkward is part of being human, and therefore, part of being yourself,” Krahl said.  “Instead of ignoring or covering up our awkwardness, we hope this week can help people acknowledge their awkwardness and their humanity. If you are happy with being awkward, then it makes it easier to accept others as well.”The GRC encourages students to join the Facebook event, “Notre Dame Awkward Awareness Week,” to promote the event and change their profile picture to the banner on the Facebook page.“Hopefully, Awkward Awareness Week can give people some laughs and make them feel a little less pressured and a little more human,” Krahl said. Tags: Awkward Awareness Weeklast_img read more

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Lecture highlights the genres of Shakespeare’s plays

first_imgOn Friday, as part of the “Folio Friday” lecture series, Peter Holland, the McNeel Family Chair in Shakespeare Studies, spoke on impact of genre classification in the First Folio.  The First Folio, currently on display in the Hesburgh Library, is Shakespeare’s first published collection of plays.Holland began his talk with a discussion of the history and the importance of the First Folio.“The “First Folio” was brought together by fellow actors in the Kingsmen [Shakespeare Company], John Heminges and Henry Condell in 1623,” he said. “It was the first appearance of, among others, ‘Macbeth,’ ‘The Tempest,’ ‘Coriolanus’ and ‘Antony and Cleopatra,’ ‘Julius Caesar’ and ‘Twelfth Night.’ It is a strikingly complete work, there are no solo authored Shakespeare plays that survive that are not in the collection.”After giving this brief background, Holland moved into his discussion of the organization of the First Folio.“The editors of the Shakespeare collection … decided to go with organization by genre,” he said.  “[They called it] Mr. William Shakespeare’s Comedies, Histories and Tragedies.”These classifications though, according to Holland, prove too confusing to readers and scholars, “however Heminges and Condell thought they were arranging the plays, the words they used to define three genres … are equally confusing.”Holland began his dissection of the genres by discussing Shakespeare’s histories.“It is of course perfectly clear what [Heminges and Condell] took history to mean … history means English history,” he said. “[They are] a line of plays are arranged in strict chronological order in terms of monarchs from ‘King John’ to ‘King Henry VIII.’”This classification of histories though leaves out plays such as “Julius Caesar” and “Antony and Cleopatra,” which portray non-English history. Even plays which portray British nobility, but not English histories, such as “King Lear,” are classified as tragedies and not histories.The classification of comedies in the First Folio, Holland said, may be confusing to contemporary readers, “I don’t think it would have sense to Shakespeare to be concerned with whether [his comedies] were very funny, ‘Hamlet’ is full of funny moments.”The classification of comedies is based on the classic Roman definition which defines a comedy as a story which is “turbulent in the beginning and tranquil at the end,” as opposed to a tragedy, which follows the opposite path.According to Holland, these classifications help to dictate how the works are approached.“Our awareness of genre impacts how we read, watch [or] listen to a Shakespeare play.” he said. “It’s not just then a matter of putting plays into convenient groupings, instead it’s a matter of how the nature of the plays themselves as Shakespeare wrote them, are engaged all the time with an awareness of what kind of genre expectations they are grappling with from beginning to end.”Holland ended his talk discussing the ultimate impact of grouping Shakespeare’s plays into specific genres.“Thinking about genre doesn’t make anything simpler, only evermore complicated in the ways that any group would,” he said.  “[As for] the playfulness of playing with genre, there is no end, but there is of this talk.”   Zach Llorens Shakespeare’s First Folio is on displayi n Hesburgh Library until Friday.Tags: comedies, first folio, folio fridays, genre, histories, tragedies, William Shakespearelast_img read more

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Saint Mary’s ranked in top 100 liberal arts colleges

first_imgFor the eighth consecutive year, Saint Mary’s ranked among the top 100 liberal arts colleges, earning 95th on the annual U.S. News and World Reports Best National Liberal Arts Colleges list, which included over 200 colleges and universities.According to a College press release, U.S. News considers factors such as retention of students, financial resources, alumni giving and graduation rate when determining the academic quality of institutions.Approximately 93 percent of Saint Mary’s students earn a degree in four years, compared to only 80 percent of students at other non-profit private schools and 58 percent of students at public institutions.“We’re proud to be recognized for the quality of a Saint Mary’s education, which reflects the dedication and expertise of our faculty and the ability of our student body,” Saint Mary’s President Jan Cervelli said of the rankings in the press release. “Perhaps what’s most distinctive about the Saint Mary’s experience — our spiritual commitment to educating the whole person — cannot be captured in a ranking, but it’s gratifying to receive the acknowledgement of experts and peers for the work that we do.”According to the College’s Office of Institutional Research, one year after graduation, 94 percent of graduates from the class of 2015 were employed, enrolled in graduate or professional school or engaged in other full-time activities such as service or volunteer work.The “Best Colleges 2017” guidebook provides full access to the national rankings, both online and in a print edition. Saint Mary’s has been nationally ranked for more than a decade.Tags: best colleges, Jan Cervelli, liberal arts colleges, saint mary’s, U.S. News and World Reportslast_img read more

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Students participate in local March for Science

first_imgTags: conservation, education, march, March for Science, protest, science Several Saint Mary’s students marched from Howard Park to Jon R. Hunt Memorial Plaza in South Bend’s version of the March on Science, a celebration of science and a call for science to be involved in governmental policy, on Saturday.Sophomore Teresa Brickey said in an email the March for Science calls for more funding for scientific research and progress.“The March for Science was a celebration of science in general and a call to uphold the dignity of such studies,” she said. “For me, it was about showing our current administration there is no such thing as alternative facts — just facts. And these facts need to be protected and held in a high regard. We must aim for a society that funds research and progress, not walls or for-profit deportation centers.”Brickey said she attended the South Bend March for Science with several other Saint Mary’s students and she marched because as a Catholic and aspiring lawyer, she wants to help others cement science’s place in society.“Personally, I have been attending as many protests and demonstrations that align with my faith and personal morals,” she said. “Science and faith do go hand in hand. As a devout Catholic, global citizen and breathing human being, it is my responsibility to do as much as I can to protect truths and to protect the common dignity that we all share. Science is real and should be left out of absurd political party agendas, hence why the march was bipartisan.”Freshman Olivia Garza said in an email she marched because she and her mother strongly believe in water conservation and the importance of raising awareness for global warming. “My mom is a hippie and strongly believes in conservation of water and reducing our carbon footprint,” Garza said. “Also, the Trump administration is cutting the [Environmental Protection Agency] by 31 percent, which is very alarming. I also marched for global warming.”Brickey said the March for Science was necessary because America’s current administration wants to cut funding to several environmental and educational factions of the government.  “Our current administration is in the process of creating their budget cuts,” she said. “They intend to decrease the allocation of funding to groups like the EPA, National Parks, the Department of Education,  grants that protect our water quality and many other areas that simply are more important than offsetting the increase in defense funding.”Garza said she believes the March for Science is a march for future generations. “Students are the future,” she said. “We are the future teachers, lawyers, doctors, parents of America, and I want this plant to continue to be beautiful for the future. If we disregard climate change and global warming, we are doing disservice to ourselves and to future generations.”Garza said students have the opportunity to raise awareness for science, education and conservation. “I encourage students to recycle, to shop at thrift stores online or in person, use reusable water bottles or Brita filters and reusable bags,” she said. “March for science, keep updated on the EPA and other political issues that concern climate. We can plant trees within our own communities.” last_img read more

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One Republic to perform at IDEA Week 2020

first_imgThe band One Republic will perform as part of IDEA Week 2020, the University announced in a Thursday press release. The Grammy Award nominated musical group will perform a concert at Notre Dame’s Purcell Pavilion on April 25.Idea Week — which will run from April 19 to April 25, 2020, aims to foster innovation and entrepreneurship in the greater South Bend region. It is hosted annually by Notre Dame and “various community organizations and businesses,” the release said. The event features an entertainment component — the Chainsmokers performed at the Purcell Pavilion in 2018, followed by Tim McGraw in 2019. Comedian Jim Gaffigan and singer Scotty McCreery performed last year at other venues in the area.Tickets for the concert will go on sale Wednesday. Tickets will cost $30 for students and between $50 and $149 for the general public.The presence of outside entertainers is meant to foster a sense of collective creativity on the part of those participating in the week’s events, Bryan Ritchie — Notre Dame’s vice president and Cathy and John Martin associate provost for innovation — said in the release.“Recent research has shown that some of the criteria necessary for creating an ecosystem of entrepreneurship and innovation, which is what we are trying to do with IDEA Week, are fun networking events and big, mainstream entertainment performances like OneRepublic,” Ritchie said in the release. “IDEA Week’s relatively uncommon model of mixing concerts and comedians with informative sessions and learning experiences helps fill this need by facilitating the interaction of people, ideas and resources.”Other entertainment for the week will include an e-sports tournament, keynote speakers and “a major comedic act,” the release said. On the whole, the release said, IDEA Week consists of events including “meet-ups; workshops; technology experiences; and various social activities.” More events will be announced over the next five months.Tags: Idea Week, One Republic, Purcell Pavilionlast_img read more

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Civil Rights-era sculptor honored in lecture

first_imgIn honor of Notre Dame’s Walk the Walk Week, Darius A. Spieth, an alumni professor at Louisiana State University, delivered a lecture titled “Frank Hayden: A Mid-Century Sculptor between Catholicism and the Civil Rights Movement” at Notre Dame’s Snite Museum on Tuesday afternoon.Hayden’s work includes some of the first busts of Martin Luther King Jr. ever to be commissioned. Chelsey Boyle Darius Spieth, left, and Percy Pierre, right, discuss sculptor Frank Hayden’s legacy in a Tuesday lecture at the Snite Museum of Art. Hayden was one of the foremost sculptors of the Civil Rights-era and created some of the first commissioned busts of Martin Luther King, Jr.Modern art or architecture and the Catholic Church had not always gotten along with each other, but Hayden sought to introduce modern design using inexpensive materials to incite new expression in Catholic churches. His work aided reformation and modernism in southern Catholic churches, and his mahogany crucifixes, carved Stations of the Cross and stone statues of Mary and Joseph can be seen in parishes throughout the South.The artist was shot to death in 1988 in Louisiana. His son was arrested for murdering him.Spieth, an art historian who specializes in eighteenth and nineteenth century art, was familiar with Frank Hayden’s work. He decided to research his work and share the sculptor’s story at Notre Dame because, in Spieth’s view, Hayden is under-appreciated. “[He is] an artist that deserved to be rediscovered,” Spieth said. Hayden received his Master of Fine Arts at Notre Dame from 1957-1959 while studying under-renowned sculptor Ivan Mestrovic. Mestrovic, according to Spieth, praised Hayden as “a talented young man who promises to become a very good artist.” Hayden was one of the premiere artists of his time who was able to use his art to change the Church to fit the needs of the black Catholic community, Spieth said.“[Hayden is] the foremost African American sculptor of the Civil Rights period,” he said.Hayden’s former friend and fellow academic Percy Pierre also attended the lecture. Pierre assisted Spieth in his research and provided more personal context on Hayden’s life after the lecture. He maintains that Hayden deserves to receive more recognition at Notre Dame because he had such a strong connection to the University.Pierre, who attended Notre Dame for graduate school, remembered that while they were both on campus, they were joined only by approximately 15 other African American students.Pierre and Hayden would hold discussions on campus in the evenings about African American affairs in South Bend’s black community. These discussions would serve as inspiration for what would end up being Hayden’s collection of sketches titled “Black and White.””These drawings reflect painful truths during this time: a segregated Catholic Church, lack of voting rights and the marching of Martin Luther King Jr. and other activists,” Spieth said.Pierre believes that Hayden’s passion and commitment to his work in the M.F.A. department, as well as his work celebrating African American culture and the Catholic Church, should be more recognized at the University today.This lecture was the first event at an academic institution to honor Hayden’s work and memory. Hayden had always believed in the power of education and the inspiration of his art — making the inaugural lecture incredibly significant, Pierre said.Tags: Civil Rights, Frank Hayden, sculpturelast_img read more

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Demolition Of Jamestown Moose Lodge, Galloway Mansion Underway

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Image by Storm Hartmann / WNY News Now.JAMESTOWN – The demolition of an iconic Jamestown property is underway.Image by Storm Hartmann / WNY News Now.Wrecking crews are taking down the former Galloway Mansion and current Moose Lodge, 405 E. 5th St.In recent years, the building needed repair, something that the Moose Lodge was unable to financially support. Last year the structure was obtained by the Chautauqua County Land Bank and sold.The DYI Network show “Salvage Dawgs” combed through the historic property in April 2019 to salvage vintage pieces. The show’s hosts, Robert Kulp and Mike White, recover everything from doors, windows, mantels and more. Once items are recovered, the team sells valuable pieces to a wide range of clients, from construction workers to high-end interior designers, who use them to restore other historical buildings and add character to newer structures.Before the Moose, the mansion was owned by the Galloway family who found fortune as Pennsylvania oil tycoons.The Galloway daughter, Grace, was a singer that regularly played at the Chautauqua Institution. Grace died of tuberculosis at age 27 in 1898.Her father commissioned a statue in Grace’s memory at Lakeview Cemetery. A Pittsburgh artist used Grace’s last portrait to model a statue after her.“Lady in the glass.” Photo date: 04/04/19. Image by Justin Gould/WNYNewsNow.The mystery surrounding Grace and her statue has persisted for decades.last_img read more

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