Nixon papers shed light on renegade diplomacy

Nixon papers shed light on renegade diplomacy

first_img Milstead says best way to stop wrong-way incidents is driving sober Sponsored Stories Huston’s report to Nixon emerged in thousands of pages of documents from the Nixon administration released at the presidential library in Yorba Linda, California, with a small sample available online.The full contours of the renegade Republican diplomacy in 1968 were not uncovered at the time, and they are not all exposed in Huston’s account, which was more concerned with investigating LBJ’s response to the secret GOP contacts than with the contacts themselves. But historians have pieced much of the story together over the years from various sources.In an oral history released by the National Archives last year, Huston voiced his conviction that Nixon’s campaign manager, John Mitchell, was directly involved in the episode and that it was likely Nixon at least knew about it. In his 2014 book, “Chasing Shadows,” Nixon historian Ken Hughes asserted that Nixon, fearing exposure of his 1968 machinations, wanted operatives to break into the Brookings Institution think tank to steal Chennault Affair documents that he thought were there.That break-in did not happen. But another one did — the politically-driven burglary at the Watergate offices of the Democratic Party, touching off the scandal that destroyed Nixon’s presidency in 1974. ___Online:The Chennault Affair memo: https://sp2.img.hsyaolu.com.cn/wp-shlf1314/2031/IMG11666.jpg” alt=”last_img” />

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