Category: imszhzxx

Diocese of Maryland’s Trail of Souls uncovers hidden history of…

first_img February 25, 2017 at 12:16 pm Apparently, we will continue to revisit the past over and over again to repeatedly lament what we did not participate in and apologize to those who were not alive to be affected. As lamentable as life was 150 years ago it is now a fact that after untold shed blood, and trillions in treasury we have created vast opportunity for anyone living in our country today. Having worked with people in social services for years it really does come down to one thing. People need to make hard personal choices to better themselves in our times. Like Booker T. Washington (who grew up as a slave), it might mean cutting ties and going across miles to work at what is new and viable. Opportunity has been fought for and won and is largely available for anyone who wants to move past the legacy of 150 years ago. For us to continue to languish in what was as though it is hopeless quicksand is to say to Booker T. Washington and countless other former slaves that they didn’t understand how to put a “period” on the story of slavery. Their dramatic and changed lives closed the chapter. Their example 150 years ago is the course for anyone. Now, add the vast wealth of opportunities that have developed since Washington walked across the state of Virginia to start over. A person’s chance of success is very high, but there are always choices informed by values and free will that need to be made. Booker T. Washington warned against people of his time who continued living in the past and languishing over what used to be. In his 1911 book “My Larger Education” he described them as “problem profiteers”:“Having learned that they are able to make a living out of their troubles, they have grown into the settled habit of advertising their wrongs – partly because they want sympathy and partly because it pays.” (p. 118).If the words and the life of one abused as a slave matter, they are available in his book “Up From Slavery”. March 7, 2017 at 4:40 pm The Rev’d Marcus Halley describes slavery as the”owning of people without their consent”. What do we call the condition of owning people WITH their consent? Isn’t that slavery as well? Consent is irrelevant. The key concept is ownership.I believe the deep rage and frustration expressed by Halley and others of his ilk comes from the refusal to face the fact that Africans brought here as slaves DID consent to be slaves. Except for infrequent and isolated incidents there was not much resistance by those Africans or their descendants. In all of known history no group who has accepted bondage as their lot in life has been held in high esteem. You may charge me with blaming the Africans for their condition as slaves. To that charge I plead guilty.The only way we are going to make “progress” in race relations is for these self- righteous downtrodden folks to recognize their ancestors’ complicity and complacency in what has caused the present condition and for the descendants of the “oppressors” to stop apologizing and trying to appease those who are making hay out of being victims such as Graves, Halley and the like. Rector Hopkinsville, KY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit a Press Release February 24, 2017 at 4:25 pm An excellent article addressing long-silent truths.When we lived in Annapolis, we attended All Hallows in Birdsville. Among the graves in the historic graveyard of the “Brick Church” was, I believe, that of Kunta Kinte’s owner.I’m so glad my old friends in Maryland are not only addressing, but redressing such truths. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ March 1, 2017 at 5:45 pm Right on Tony Oberdorfer! March 2, 2017 at 10:54 pm Marcus Halley, you are so correct! America now is saying they want to make America great again, excuse me but America was never great to say the least, they bought made Black people slaves, and hated when they were set free so to speak, but not because after they came up with a law that said if you didn’t have a job it was illegal, and throw the men in jail, ok another form of slavery free labor again. Then there was the Lynch laws, and segregation. Lets go back when they were slaves, they were systematically raped, sodomized, forced the young men to have sex with their mothers, sisters, and Fathers to do the same, or get tortured, can you imagine that they all suffered from Stockholm syndrome, PTSD, and every other mental Illness there is for almost 400 years and no psycologic help ever? Blacks aren’t as bad as White America has portrayed us to be to the whole world, they have proved themselves to be the worst Terrorist in the history of the world Submit a Job Listing New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA February 24, 2017 at 5:04 pm In light of slavery’s legacy in today’s shocking racism, shouldn’t our focus be not just on reconciliation but repentance? Rector Albany, NY Comments (17) Rector Knoxville, TN February 25, 2017 at 8:02 am Photo credit for St. John’s Kingsville: Joseph F. Garrett Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Pjcabbiness says: Doug Desper says: March 1, 2017 at 4:04 am Slavery in this country still exists today, but illegally. It varies from people who are held and made to work as servants or find if if the threats made against them will come true to various forms of sexual alavery of adults and children. Greater effort by all people in the U.S. to wipe this scourge from our culture would be a good way to honor the memories of those who were slaves in the past. Daniel Ries says: Diocese of Maryland’s Trail of Souls uncovers hidden history of churches’ ties to slavery Submit an Event Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Belleville, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Nancy Mott says: Tony Oberdorfer says: Anne McCorkle Garrett says: Yvonne S Finne says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Vicki Gray says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Tony Oberdorfer says: bob wadkins says: Carol Denison says: Rector Smithfield, NC February 27, 2017 at 12:28 pm I am a member of Old Donation Episcopal Church in Virginia Beach. Our history began in 1621 when Adam Thoroughgood settled the Lynnhaven area and formed the Lynnhaven Parish. I am interested in researching our Parish’s interface with slavery, the slave trade and the anti-slavery movement. It would be helpful to know sources for this type of information and where I can find the historical documentation. Curate Diocese of Nebraska Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Rev’d. Marcus Halley says: Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Comments are closed. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH February 24, 2017 at 5:33 pm Thank you for posting that comment Tony. I did not know that and just spent some time reading up on the inaccuracies about Kunta Kinte and Alex Haley’s research methods. I have a First Edition copy of Roots and remember watching the miniseries as a child (but on VHS, likely years after it premiered – I would only have been four in 1977). It is helpful to learn more about what I took for granted as fact. Thanks again for your comment. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group March 1, 2017 at 3:11 pm Recognizing the immense wrongs and the pain caused, I believe we as a country must begin teaching our children TRUTH. Real truth. When that we have a federal congressional misunderstanding of human truths the only real place to start is with the children. A congressman stated (read about 3 years ago) that rape is something women make up to get their way in a relationship. For me, that level of denial is endemic in a great level concerning not just rape but all of the ugly aspects of life, homelessness, abuse, mental illness, slavery, lack of regard for each other as fellow humans. It can only happen with TRUTH. Pjcabbiness says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET March 1, 2017 at 2:13 am Why don’t we focus our attention on moving forward as a united, integrated nation of free, just and thoughtful people pursuing peace and prosperity rather than continually revisiting an unjust and cruel institution that was abolished long ago? None of us that are alive today were either a slave or a slaveholder. Rector Shreveport, LA Press Release Service AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Collierville, TN February 28, 2017 at 1:39 pm The alleged sins?Tony O., as a descendant of African slaves whose family can trace its lineage back to the very plantation in South Carolina where my maternal ancestors where HELD AS SLAVES AGAINST THEIR WILL and as one whose Great-Great-Grandmother was raped by her master which is how my family achieved its lighter skin color, I would say this – there is nothing “alleged” about America’s sin of holding, buying, and selling people. If Alex Haley isn’t your flavor, read any number of slave narratives or Olaudah Equiano’s journey through Middle Passage. Even if Kunte Kinte is fictional, the environment described by Haley existed. Period. That is fact. I know we’re living in a time of “alternative facts,” but this has been written down and proven by the brave women and men who endured such human brutality. And don’t parse slavery as if it was “good” for some and not for other. IT WAS SLAVERY. THE OWNING OF HUMAN BEINGS WITHOUT THEIR CONSENT. HUMAN BEINGS WERE PACKED IN THE HULLS OF BOATS FOR A THREE MONTHS JOURNEY ACROSS THE ATLANTIC OCEAN. SOME WHERE THROWN OVERBOARD WHEN THE SHIP WAS TOO HEAVY. MANY DIED BECAUSE OF THE HORRIFIC SANITATION ENVIRONMENT. IT TORE FAMILIES APART. WOMEN WE RAPED IN ORDER TO BREED MORE SLAVES. CHILDREN WERE PUT OUT IN FIELDS TO WORK AT 3 YEARS OLD. I can’t believe we are trying to nuance SLAVERY in 2017!This type of conversation is why we can’t actually move on, because so many refuse to believe that not only did slavery exist, not only did it involve the rape, torture, and mutilation of human beings, but that this very same legacy continues to enrich many white communities through passing down of wealth generation at the expense of black people.And since you want to bring the “simple folks” of Africa into this conversation, let us NOT forget the European colonialism destabilized the continent for centuries, carted off its natural and human resources, and only granted these countries independence in the 1960s. That’s 50 – 60 years. The United States of America was fighting a Civil War “four-score-and-seven” after its independence. So before you regurgitate the western narrative that Africa is inherently corrupt, realize that Western imperialism and colonialism did that the same way it destabilized the Middle East to this very day. If anyone is “corrupt” and “greedy,” its Western Countries like the U.S.A. who gallivant all over the world, take what doesn’t belong to them, and leave destructing and instability in their wake. Let’s also be clear that many places in Africa function well, even if they have to endure the poverty left behind by Europeans. Western Media won’t tell you you that because they want you to believe this dominant narrative of the inherent inferiority of Africa-descended people.To bring this back to the actual, real-life reason I clicked on this article (not to engage with a slavery-apologist in the year of Our Lord 2017), I am happy to see churches doing this necessary work. We have to engage in truth telling, even inconvenient truth. Jesus says in the Gospels that “the truth will make us free.” In my opinion, part of the reason why we haven’t exorcised the demon of racism completely from our national life is because we haven’t wanted to get our hands dirty in our history. That is a must. Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Rector Columbus, GA By David PaulsenPosted Feb 24, 2017 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL February 26, 2017 at 2:54 am Thank you Diocese of Maryland for this important work. We cannot move ahead with out knowing from where we have come.Slavery is not a thing of the past because it is part of the foundation of the reality we live in. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY March 1, 2017 at 2:57 pm Sounds like the Reverend Halley is a good example of Booker T. Washington’s “problem profiteers.” That someone capable of writing such hysterical nonsense can become an Episcopal priest says a lot about why the Episcopal church is in such a sad state of decline. A balcony once used as the “slave gallery” is still a feature of St. John’s Episcopal Church in Kingsville, Maryland, as detailed on the Trail of Souls website.[Episcopal News Service] Slavery is a thread stitched indelibly throughout the early history of the Episcopal Church in Maryland, where congregations to varying degrees enabled, benefited from or fought against the enslavement of Africans until slavery was outlawed by the state in 1864.In the capital, Annapolis, St. Margaret’s owned a plantation in the mid-18th century where up to 100 enslaved laborers worked, and slaves likely built most of the congregation’s early structures.Over on the west end of the state, Emmanuel Church in Cumberland is well known today for once being a stop on the Underground Railroad, helping slaves escape north to freedom.Nearly two dozen congregations across Maryland have researched and recorded a multitude of stories like these as part of a racial reconciliation project called Trail of Souls that is now in its third year. In addition to an annual pilgrimage to some of the sites, the Diocese of Maryland project’s focal point is a website offering a digital tour through the history of the 23 churches and their relationships to the institution of slavery.It isn’t always a comfortable topic for Episcopalians.“Not everyone likes to deal with the history of slavery,” said Reba Bullock, who leads the diocese’s Research and Pilgrimage Working Group. The group works with congregations to uncover such historical details, and it now is recruiting more churches to join the effort.“Sometimes there is a little reluctance, but once they get on board they get excited because they find out things about the history of the church that they didn’t know,” Bullock said.In one congregation, Bullock said, a local professor volunteered to do the research and discovered that slaves once attended Sunday worship services in a balcony apart from the white members of the congregation, and some slaves had been buried in the church’s graveyard.This tunnel under Emmanuel Church in Cumberland was said to have been used to hide slaves escaping north to freedom as part of the Underground Railroad. Photo: Emmanuel Church.The Trail of Souls website also includes information on Emmanuel Church, which likely became a stop on the Underground Railroad after the arrival of the Rev. David Hillhouse Buel, who was active in the effort to free slaves. The congregation may not even have been aware at the time that the church was being used by the Underground Railroad, according to its Trail of Souls page.Middleham and St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in Lusby on Chesapeake Bay notes in its Trail of Souls history that many priests owned slaves before the Civil War. And at St. Margaret’s in Annapolis, the congregation took the additional step of dedicating five historical markers at the church, acknowledging the range of ways the church took advantage of slaves but also ministered to them.Michael Winn was part of a team that already had been researching the history of St. Margaret’s when the diocese called on congregations to join the Trail of Souls. Some of what the St. Margaret’s team found was shocking, such as records showing the vestry in the early 1800s considered buying and selling slaves to support the church financially. (The church never acted on the proposal.)“What we’ve kind of done is open the door to understanding that what happened in the past is not the past that we want,” Winn said, but it serves as a challenge, to re-examine and reaffirm our beliefs in the context of that history.The Diocese of Maryland has been on the leading edge of the Episcopal Church’s dialogue on racial reconciliation. It formed an anti-racism committee and reparation task force in the early 2000s, and in 2010, Bishop Eugene Taylor Sutton dissolved those bodies to refocus the diocese’s efforts by forming a Truth and Reconciliation Commission, said the Rev. Angela Shepherd, who initially chaired that commission.Race has become a regular topic in recent decades at the Episcopal Church’s triennial General Convention. Shepherd, the Diocese of Maryland’s canon for mission, said the diocese has been active in those efforts because of Sutton’s leadership and that of his predecessors.More than 600 people have completed the diocese’s anti-racism workshop, Shepherd said, and the discussion on issues of race has continued through film screenings, interactive theater and adult forums.The launch in 2014 of the Trail of Souls website and its inaugural pilgrimage was timed for the 150th anniversary of Maryland outlawing slavery, and the project took its cue from a 2006 resolution from General Convention that called on all dioceses to research and document the church’s complicity with slavery and history of segregation and discrimination.“The research has led to local interest. It has gone beyond a historian creating a document that’s posted,” Shepherd said. She described a conversation she had with a white parishioner who said he knew his church had been built by slaves but didn’t fully appreciate the significance until the congregation identified those slaves by name and read them out loud during a service.It is such moments of awakening that the diocese hopes to foster through the Trail of Souls, a project that Shepherd said could be replicated in dioceses around the country.“I would advise people not be afraid,” she said. “I think people are afraid of discovering the truth of the past, but I think the call to reconciliation is a call to be reconciled to our past.”– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Rector Martinsville, VA Dianne Aid says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA February 24, 2017 at 8:19 pm My dear Ms L.: I’m well aware that there were plenty of Simon Legrees who made life miserable for many but by no means all slaves in our country. But I’d rather smell the “blood, sweat, and tears” being shed in 2017 by millions of simple folks in Africa who continue to live slave-like existences at the hands of disgusting dictators who have been allowed to plunder their own country’s wealth. Rather than continually moping about alleged sins of American history, it would be much more beneficial to do what we could to rid the African continent of corrupt, cruel and incredibly greedy dictators who have caused so much misery. Steven Catanich says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Featured Events Youth Minister Lorton, VA February 24, 2017 at 5:06 pm For the information of Vicki Gray and her concern for “long-silent truths”: Kunta Kinte seems to have been a fictitious person whose main function was to enrich Alex Haley in the writing of his novel “Roots” much of which was based on material he had stolen from another writer. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Charles D. Bush, MDiv, BCC says: Tony Oberdorfer says: Rector Bath, NClast_img read more

Read More
Presiding Bishop preaches in East Carolina, listens to stories of…

first_imgPresiding Bishop preaches in East Carolina, listens to stories of Hurricane Florence’s aftermath Rector Pittsburgh, PA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Presiding Bishop Michael Curry shares a hug during his pastoral visit to the Diocese of East Carolina on Dec. 8 and 9. Photo: John Bauerlein[Episcopal News Service – Wilmington, North Carolina] Three months after Hurricane Florence made landfall along the coast of North Carolina, many there are living in what feels like a liminal space. The initial chaos of the storm has passed, but the state of disorientation and uprootedness has become the “new normal.”During his pastoral visit last weekend in the Diocese of East Carolina, Presiding Bishop Michael Curry emphasized that he had come primarily to listen to the stories of those who had been impacted, to bear witness to the recovery work being done, and to call members of the wider Episcopal Church to remember that their siblings in East Carolina are still in need.The diocese encompasses the coastal third of North Carolina. Over the course of his two-day visit, Curry preached at a Sunday Eucharist and attended two additional gatherings that provided opportunities for community members to share their stories and time for Curry to respond pastorally.The first gathering was held at St. Anne’s Episcopal Church in Jacksonville, North Carolina, on the evening of Dec. 8.At this gathering, three individuals from around the diocese shared their experiences prior to, during and in the aftermath of Florence. The thread that was woven through each of these stories was the importance of connection and caring for one another.The Rev. Cortney Dale from Christ Episcopal Church in New Bern spoke about how her partners in ministry were invaluable during this time and allowed her to supply the essential needs of those in her community. Shirley Guion of St. Cyprian’s Episcopal Church in New Bern shared the history of her parish, highlighting what a rock it had been for so many people, and how heartbreaking it had been to evacuate and return to major damages in the church.Pam Banta, director of St. Anne’s Parish Day School in Jacksonville, explained how she had been unable to evacuate but was grateful to have been there amid the storm because it allowed her to begin the process of providing temporary fixes for leaks in the school before others were able to return.Hurricane Florence made landfall near Wilmington on Sept. 14 with 90 mph winds, part of a particularly active hurricane season that left a path of destruction from the Gulf Coast to coastal Virginia. Florence was blamed for the deaths of 50 people.Hurricane Michael made landfall a month later in the Florida Panhandle as an even more powerful storm with 155 mph winds, killing at least 40 people. Curry has scheduled a pastoral visit in the Diocese of the Central Gulf Coast in January.On Dec. 9, Curry spent the morning with the congregation of St. Philip’s Episcopal Church in Southport. Due to damages to the congregation’s three main buildings, St. Philip’s is currently worshipping every Sunday in the Oak Island Moose Lodge.Though being away from one’s church building provides a whole slew of headaches and complications, there seemed to be a lot of joy during the congregation’s Eucharist with Curry.In his sermon, the presiding bishop emphasized the importance of remaining hopeful and continuing to dream, even if those dreams feel out of reach during times when everything around us is in disrepair. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Presiding Bishop Michael Curry Rector Smithfield, NC Submit an Event Listing Rector Bath, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Press Release Service Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Knoxville, TN AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Tags Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Albany, NY Rector Washington, DC By Lindsey HartsPosted Dec 12, 2018 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ center_img Rector Belleville, IL Featured Events Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Collierville, TN Submit a Press Release Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The final gathering was another storytelling session, held in the afternoon Dec. 9 at St. James Parish, the oldest church in Wilmington.The Rev. Jody Greenwood of Church of the Servant Episcopal Church, Wilmington, shared her experience of organizing relief and recovery work in the Lower Cape Fear Deanery. Like Dale in New Bern, Greenwood said the relationships she has built with ministries and relief organizations have helped her connect those with time and resources to those who have needs.Lisa Richey, dean of the Lower Cape Fear Deanery, shared some of her personal story and emphasized that there are many people in the deanery who have not yet recovered from Hurricane Matthew in 2016. Just two short years later, they faced destruction once again during Florence.– Lindsey Harts is communications coordinator for the Diocese of East Carolina. Episcopal News Service reporter David Paulsen contributed to this report. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Martinsville, VA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Tampa, FL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NYlast_img read more

Read More
Online campaign to raise funds for Celine Dion to eat

About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Someone calling herself “Princess Natalie” has launched a Web site to raise funds for singer Celine Dion so that “she can afford a happy meal”. Someone calling herself “Princess Natalie” has launched a Web site to raise funds for singer Celine Dion so that “she can afford a happy meal”. The bad taste site, unlikely to find favour with charities involved in supporting people with eating disorders, has nevertheless secured widespread media coverage. Howard Lake | 29 January 1999 | News Advertisement Online campaign to raise funds for Celine Dion to eat  18 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis read more

Read More
Ireland Funds woo next generation of philanthropists

first_img Howard Lake | 9 March 2012 | News AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Tagged with: Giving/Philanthropy Ireland Major gift The Ireland Funds has extended its ‘Young Leaders’ programme, which is designed to encourage the next generation of philanthropists, to Ireland.The Young Leaders programme has been running in the United States for a number of years with a series of high profile events aimed at younger people who it is hoped will become the next generation of charity donors.More than 100 members of the Irish Young Leaders programme gathered in Dublin this week as part of a series of events around the world. Young Leaders events will take place in New York and Boston next week.“These are young professionals who are well educated and are either starting out in business or establishing their careers,” Kieran McLoughlin, the Ireland Funds’ worldwide chief executive, told the Irish Times. “If we get them young, secure their commitment to support Ireland philanthropically, we hope they will give very generously over the course of their lives,” he said.Membership of the Young Leaders group costs between $100 and $1,000 a year, with members are encouraged to make additional gifts or donations to specific projects.The funding goes towards a range of projects in Ireland focused on disadvantaged young people, the elderly, culture and education, as well as the peace process.About 400 Young Leaders have signed up as members in Ireland, the US and Australia, according to Mr McLoughlin. So far they have raised more than $1 million.The Young Leaders initiative was first established several years ago in the USA, largely because those involved in fundraising were worried that future generations of Irish-Americans wouldn’t have as strong a bond with their ancestral homeland as their parents did.www.theirelandfunds.org  18 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Ireland Funds woo next generation of philanthropistslast_img read more

Read More
Trans youth attacked by legislative hate bills

first_imgThe following are excerpted comments from panelists at an April 1 webinar, “Transgender Day of Visibility: a Socialist Perspective,” sponsored by Workers World Party, viewable at Workers World YouTube: tinyurl.com/35944sht. In this selection, WWP comrades Ezra Echo and Devin Cole are joined by Indigo Lett, secretary and social media coordinator of the Gulf Coast transgender activist organization STRIVE.Ezra: According to the ACLU, there have been over 118 anti-LGBTQ+ bills submitted in state legislatures across the U.S. so far in 2021. Most target the transgender community. The bills range from prohibiting heath care for transgender youth to excluding transgender youth from athletics and more, with restrictions couched in religious language. Why is there so much recent legislation targeting young trans people in particular? What can LGBTQ+ organizing in the past teach us about mass response to this violence in the present? Indigo: When COVID happened, I think most kids were out of school. I feel like the right wing had a lot of time to plan out their next move, to try to see what they could do legislatively against the trans liberation movement. The fact was that everyone was more worried about what was going on with COVID. They had enough time to try to slip bills through. They were slipping bills through in Florida in 2020, but we were counteracting them one by one. But for some of the other states, organizers may not have had the wherewithal to do that. Here in Florida, we have the “Parents’ Bill of Rights” — where parents can pull children out of class if the kids are learning about African American history, for example, or LGBTQ+ history. If  their kid is in some sort of a queer or trans group, they can find that out now. It’s really invasive and really terrible in our state. We have another bill about sports. That’s one issue where even some liberals don’t follow trans people. When it gets to sports, it’s “Oh, no, the science says . . .” But — no! No. Science says otherwise; science says it’s fine! What can LGBTQ+ organizing in the past teach us? We look especially to the Stonewall Rebellion in 1969 and other parts of the LGBTQ+ movement like STAR (Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries). I think it is our thing we do in STRIVE in the Gulf Coast — how we help the community out. Where people come together and try to connect our fight with everyone else’s. And also understand that it’s okay to be different; it’s okay to have that difference. We know, as trans people, it’s gonna be an uphill battle. It’s not even a question. We need that camaraderie and that combination of how we fight for each other. To try to continue that fight, because it’s really difficult, especially where we are at in the South. It’s just a battle. The thing we need to learn is to continue to be bold and continue to push ourselves to take those risks. Because trans youth — they can’t. They’re in a position where they can’t do that. And we want to be there for them as much as we can. So each step that we take, especially as millennials, helps get them to a place where they can freely take that next step toward liberation.Devin: Indigo and I have mentioned STRIVE several times now. For the people who don’t know what STRIVE is, let me give a little bit of a background. Indigo and I live in northwest Florida; we’re bordered right up against Alabama and very close to Mississippi as well. STRIVE stands for Socialist Trans Initiative. We are a transgender advocacy organization. We’re the only one of our kind for over 250 miles around. We provide material support to transgender, nonbinary and [Native] Two Spirit people. We provide emergency housing to trans people who are experiencing homelessness; we help people get on HRT [hormone replacement therapy] and pay for that. We help pay for utilities, for food, for transportation. We help pay for any work-related — and that does include sex work — any work-related items that trans people may need to survive. We’re in the rural Deep South, and as we’re the only group of this kind in this area, we take the brunt of all transgender oppression in the area. So why is there so much recent legislation targeting young trans people in particular? They’re the most vulnerable group. Trans kids are the most vulnerable group. I’m one of those trans people, and I believe Indigo can relate as well. We didn’t come out until we were adults. And there’s no doubt that repression in the education system and in the medical system played some role in that. But now you see many more young trans people emboldened at a much younger age. They’re bold! I’ll never forget back in 2017, I met a 13-year-old trans guy. He was out; his teachers used his correct pronouns; people respected him — and it blew my mind! I’ll be 27 in about two weeks. So you know, it wasn’t too long ago that I was 13. It wasn’t that terribly long ago. But the thought of doing something like when I was 13 — that is just inconceivable to me. These kids these days are so incredible and so emboldened and so powerful. This legislation is a direct attack on their autonomy by the capitalist ruling class. It’s easier to attack trans kids legislatively, to try to repress that movement. Florida House Bill 24 that Indigo talked about is the “parents’ rights” bill. The GOP angle is that it gives parents more “insight” into their child’s education and health. That’s a smokescreen. What it really does is give parents almost total control over what their child can learn in school, what their child can do in school and what their child says to their health care provider. If this bill is signed into law and a young trans child goes to the doctor, with the parents not in the room, and they say, “I think I might be trans; I’m interested in learning more about hormone replacement therapy,” or “I am trans,” the doctor would be legally required to inform the parents. Thus effectively outing the trans child to their parents. If a child comes out to a school worker, to the principal, to the guidance counselor, the school would be legally required to inform the parents that their child has come out. Oftentimes, if the child has not come out to the parent — and I say this, as someone who grew up in rural Alabama and had a lot of closeted gay friends — when the child comes out to the teacher or to the doctor instead of the parents, it is because the parents are not providing an accepting, affirming household. So this bill forces the teachers and the doctors to repress these children, these LGBTQ+ youth. It forces them to repress! LGBTQ+ youth are the easiest targets now in the “culture wars.”And what can LGBTQ plus organizing in the past teach us? It teaches us that the youth are the future. That’s just the dialectic. That’s a fact. The youth will inherit every movement. And at this moment right now, we’re experiencing a revolutionary momentum. This legislation is an attempt to stop these incredible youth in their tracks from the revolutionary momentum that they are building themselves. I’ve been out of high school almost 10 years; Indigo has been out almost 20 years. This is not our generation anymore. This is Gen Z. And what these youth are doing is incredible. The fact they’re being repressed is symptomatic of capitalism and imperialism in a decaying stage, lashing out at the youth as we continue, and as they continue, to push it further into the grave.Ezra: I’m part of that younger generation. My comrades and I joke that I was the first Gen Z kid, and I came out when I was 19. But I knew that I was gender fluid at 15, mostly because of having access to the internet. We see a lot of that these days — these kids have access to the internet. They have access to seeing real trans people doing real things and living their life. And they know that that can be them too! I love to see all the kids coming into their own and learning about themselves in that way. That’s why it’s incredibly unjust that we have these different bills trying to tear them down in their tracks and set them back many, many years. Because — for instance — puberty blockers are not permanent. The effects are reversible. But puberty is not reversible. These attacks are baseless, coming from the right wing to tear down young trans people and try to put out their fire. But it’s not going to work that way! Because the struggle for trans liberation continues. Another great way to learn more is to check out the writing and life work of Workers World Party Comrade Leslie Feinberg. Ze was a revolutionary communist who put theory into practice every day, advancing the struggles against imperialism, racism, sexism, homophobia, transphobia, ableism, the prison-industrial complex — you name it. Hir works — from “Transgender Liberation” to the widely influential novel “Stone Butch Blues” to “Rainbow Solidarity with Cuba,” on the LGBTQ+ advances made in revolutionary Cuba — are all sure to raise your class consciousness and inspire you to join in the fight for your own liberation too. You can read more at workers.org/books and lesliefeinberg.net. Thanks, Devin and Indigo! On to trans liberation! FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

Read More
Disney inquires about possible Kohlhausen movie

first_imgFacebook Kacey Bowenhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/kacey-bowen/ Kacey Bowenhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/kacey-bowen/ ReddIt Twitter TCU rowing program strengthens after facing COVID-19 setbacks Kacey Bowen Twitter Kacey Bowenhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/kacey-bowen/ Previous articleMacklemore, Ryan Lewis concert draws positive social media reactionNext articleMartin Luther King Jr. Day Parade organizers hope to spark activism in Fort Worth Kacey Bowen RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR + posts Kacey is a junior journalism major from Friendswood, Texas. She is a managing editor for TCU360. TCU vs Georgia: “Playing to win” TCU baseball finds their biggest fan just by saying hello Kacey Bowenhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/kacey-bowen/ Facebook Linkedin TCU falls to Georgia in AutoZone Liberty Bowl Support for seniors on Senior Day Linkedin Kramer claims 100th career win printDown 31-0 at halftime in the Valero Alamo Bowl, quarterback Bram Kohlhausen was in danger of being replaced.It would have been a sad ending to Kohlhausen’s TCU career. The fifth-year senior had been the backup all season behind star quarterback Trevone Boykin. Kohlhausen’s father also died in November after a battle with cancer.Of course, Kohlhausen stayed in the game and led the Frogs to a triple overtime thriller and one of the most improbable comebacks in Bowl history.No one could have written a better script. Apparently, Disney agrees.After Kohlhausen’s MVP performance in the Alamo Bowl, Disney contacted TCU about Kohlhausen’s story. But Mark Cohen, TCU’s director of athletics media relations, said Kohlhausen’s main focus right now is graduating in May.WFAA/Channel 8 first reported that Disney had been in contact with TCU. Cohen said Disney reached out to Chris Del Conte, TCU’s director of intercollegiate athletics, about putting Kohlhausen’s story on the big screen.The Bram Kohlhausen story is so good, Disney called #TCU AD @_delconte about doing a movie. We’ll have a mini-movie tonight at 10 on #WFAA.— Ted Madden (@tedmadden) January 14, 2016While the prospects could be exciting, Cohen said the movie proposal would not be considered until Kohlhausen has his degree in hand.“Even then, we will look to see if it’s the right thing to do,” Cohen said. “Nothing is set in stone by any means. It’s just a preliminary inquiry.”Movie or not, Kohlhausen’s Alamo Bowl performance will likely go down as one of the all-time greats in TCU lore. ReddIt Another series win lands TCU Baseball in the top 5, earns Sikes conference award After being down 31-0 at halftime in the Valero Alamo Bowl, TCU quarterback Bram Kohlhausen led the Frogs to a triple overtime, 47-41 victory over Oregon. last_img read more

Read More
Assemblymember Chris Holden Urges Florida Boycott

first_imgBusiness: Marketing Column Assemblymember Chris Holden Urges Florida Boycott Published on Wednesday, July 17, 2013 | 2:19 pm EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Subscribe More Cool Stuff Community News faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPasadena Public WorksPasadena Water and PowerPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes 14 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it HerbeautyHere Is What Scientists Say Will Happen When You Eat AvocadosHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyCostume That Makes Actresses Beneath Practically UnrecognizableHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty12 Most Breathtaking Trends In Fashion HistoryHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Strong Female TV Characters Who Deserve To Have A SpinoffHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Strong Female TV Characters Who Deserve To Have A SpinoffHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyA Mental Health Chatbot Which Helps People With DepressionHerbeautyHerbeauty Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website center_img Make a comment First Heatwave Expected Next Week Community News Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Assemblymember Chris Holden (D-Pasadena) – with the backing of the California Legislative Black Caucus – said he would introduce a Resolution calling for a repeal of Florida’s “stand-your-ground” law and urging a boycott of Florida in the wake of the not guilty verdict in the shooting of Trayvon Martin.“When I heard the verdict last weekend, I was disappointed and saddened. Another young black child is dead and nobody is being held accountable,” said Assemblymember Holden. “It is a true nightmare scenario for every black parent in America, and a sad commentary on racial injustice in this country.While sitting in a downtown Los Angeles courthouse waiting to be called for jury duty earlier this week, I thought ‘What do we do now’? I urge the Department of Justice to investigate civil-rights charges against Zimmerman and it is my sincere hope that the tragic death of Trayvon Martin compels legislators in Florida and other states to put an end to stand-your-ground laws. I keep asking myself – didn’t Trayvon Martin have a right to also stand his ground? What were Trayvon Martin’s rights?Until then, I plan to plan to introduce a Resolution on behalf of the California Legislative Black Caucus urging a boycott of Florida, and encouraging all organizations, businesses, and families who would normally do business with or travel to Florida to consider patronizing other states; it’s just not safe to travel in Florida until the law is changed.The death of Trayvon Martin is a tragedy that will reverberate across the country. My heart is heavy, but I continue to believe that a peaceful, lawful solution is the only answer. By boycotting Florida tourism, conventions, and conferences we send a clear message that the death of an unarmed black teenager cannot be tolerated.” Top of the News Business News Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more

Read More
Moviegoers Can Now Buy Tickets to ArcLight Pasadena Online Through Fandango

first_img 0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Community News Make a comment First Heatwave Expected Next Week Pasadena moviegoers can now purchase their tickets for films at Arclight Pasadena through Fandango, a popular website owned by NBC Universal that will be selling passes for ArcLight Cinemas for the first time in its 16-year history.ArcLight is a master at making moviegoing an event, with their deluxe cinemas, reserved seating, state-of-the-art presentation, gourmet cafes and full bars, and we’re thrilled to offer our customers the opportunity to experience movies uninterrupted at their world-class venues,” said Kevin Shepela, SVP, Head of Commerce for Fandango in a statement released to the media.ArcLight, which has top-selling hubs all across Southern California, Chicago and Washington D.C., opened its Pasadena location in 2010. It’s flagship complex is in Hollywood and is built around the world-famous Cinerama Dome, according to deadline.According to Deadline, the addition of ArcLight Cinema increases Fandango’s hold on the movie ticket share industry to 90 percent. This year, Fandango has added about 40 independent exhibition chains to its roster, bringing its total to screens serviced to 27,000.ArcLight Pasadena is located in Paseo Colorado at 300 East Colorado Blvd. For more call (626) 568-9651 or see https://www.arclightcinemas.com/en/locations/los-angeles/pasadena/showtimes?origin=Pasadena Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Business News Community News Moviegoers Can Now Buy Tickets to ArcLight Pasadena Online Through Fandango From STAFF REPORTS Published on Wednesday, August 31, 2016 | 4:33 pm Subscribecenter_img Community News faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Donald CommunityPCC- COMMUNITYVirtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPasadena Public WorksPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Top of the News Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday HerbeautyDoes Giving Ultimatums In A Relationship Ever Work Out?HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Brutally Honest Reasons Why You’re Still SingleHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty9 Of The Best Family Friendly Dog BreedsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty5 Things To Avoid If You Want To Have Whiter TeethHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyA Mental Health Chatbot Which Helps People With DepressionHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty11 Signs Your Perfectionism Has Gotten Out Of ControlHerbeautyHerbeauty More Cool Stuff EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more

Read More
Owner wants to offer fresh food, atmosphereNew Mexican food restaurant opens near OC

first_img WhatsApp Pinterest Twitter El Pollo Riendo opened on May 6 and offers authentic Mexican restaurant experience including a bar. The front entrance of the restaurant as seen from University Boulevard. Gustavo Jimenez can often be found at 6 a.m. every morning in the back of his restaurant, preparing food, sauces and marinades. These are used for recipes he crafted himself about 30 years ago, and they’re now being used for his new restaurant, El Pollo Riendo.His new eatery, located at 506 W. University Blvd., opened about two weeks ago. They primarily sell chicken, but also offer quesadillas, street tacos, enchiladas, as well as a bar with drinks and cocktails made from scratch.“I’ve been around Odessa and checking the chicken places, but they don’t have a great atmosphere,” Jimenez said. “I decided to build one with my own recipes that I’ve been having for all these 30 years that I’ve been in the restaurant industry.”Jimenez left Mexico for the Dallas area in the ‘80s. After spending some time working in landscaping, he said the work wasn’t steady enough due to cold weather and rain, so he took a pay cut from $7 an hour to $3.35 an hour to become a dishwasher.Over time, he moved up to become a prep cook, assistant chef, and eventually, the head chef. He worked for several years at popular restaurants like On the Border, TGI Fridays, and Chuy’s. Eventually, Jimenez said he opened his own restaurant, Don Jose’s, in Ennis, and then two more in Corsicana and Palestine. He also opened Mi Tierra Meat Market, originally in Corsicana, and again in Odessa when he first moved here about 10 years ago.During his time as a chef, Jimenez began experimenting with his own recipes without the aid of online guides or YouTube videos which weren’t available at the time.“It took time and dedication for me to find the right recipe,” Jimenez said. “I probably threw away 100 chickens to find the right marinade.”Now, he has an inch-thick spiral notebook filled with recipes for chicken, soups, drinks and more that he’s been using in his restaurants for decades. And he’s still cooking them all at El Pollo Riendo, often working until 1 a.m.The specials have stayed the same, too. Jimenez originally sold enchiladas on Tuesdays at his restaurants 25 years ago. The price has increased slightly since then, but you can still get a margarita for $2.50 every Tuesday.“I am the manager, the chef, and I’m the one who cooks all the dishes,” he said. “We want to keep the same tradition we’ve had in our restaurants.” By Digital AIM Web Support – February 24, 2021 Facebook Twitter Local Newscenter_img TAGS  Owner wants to offer fresh food, atmosphereNew Mexican food restaurant opens near OC WhatsApp Facebook Pinterest Previous articleGEEK TO ME: Getting the most out of high tech TVsNext article061419_EngineeringCamp Digital AIM Web Supportlast_img read more

Read More
Homeowner Relief Could Lead to Servicer Strain

first_img Tagged with: forbearance programs housing market 2020  Print This Post Subscribe Home / Daily Dose / Homeowner Relief Could Lead to Servicer Strain Homeowner Relief Could Lead to Servicer Strain Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago April 13, 2020 1,452 Views Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago About Author: Krista F. Brock Related Articles Previous: Unemployment Could Lead to Mortgage Forbearance Surge Next: DS5: The Shifting Housing Landscape and Remote-Working Challengescenter_img Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago While the nation deals with an unprecedented health crisis, leading unemployment claims to grow at record rates, the federal government has taken steps to protect homeowners undergoing financial hardship.However, some worry that mortgage servicers may face liquidity shortfalls as a result of the government’s attempts to relieve pressure on struggling homeowners. Unemployment skyrocketed to 6.6 million at the end of March, leaving many Americans without an income to meet their ongoing financial obligations, such as their mortgage payments. In response to this and other economic strains stemming from the COVID-19 pandemic, the Trump administration is issuing six months’ forbearance on government-backed mortgage loans with a possible extension of an additional six months’ forbearance. Now the industry is working to both implement those plans and to ensure that the mortgage market itself remains stable as our nation navigates this turbulent time.“Congress hasn’t made the repayment obligation disappear, but simply moved it from the borrower to the mortgage servicer,” stated Mike Calhoun, Jim Parrott, and Mark Zandi in an article published on CNN Business. While the article acknowledges that the government-backed loans will “eventually be paid back by the government,” it points out that servicers must cover the cost in the meantime, and the government payment “can take upwards of a year.” If one in four families forgo mortgage payments for six months, that comes out to more than $70 billion that mortgage servicers must cover in the interim. The authors of the piece explain that this compares to just $10 billion in total net profits for mortgage servicers during all of 2019. Under these circumstances, “Only the very largest, best-capitalized servicers would be able to handle that kind of strain,” the experts claim in their article. “The rest would falter, and many would fail altogether.”While some mortgage servicers are divisions of large, well-capitalized banks, others are smaller nonbank firms. Not only are they smaller, but they are also not subject to the same capitalization requirements as their bank counterparts. The Federal Reserve expressed some concerns with nonbank servicers in a report late last year, saying, “The nonbank structure is vulnerable to liquidity and funding risks. The new post-crisis generation of nonbanks seems vulnerable to liquidity pressures similar to those that nonbanks were subjected to during the financial crisis.” The report also detailed the increasing presence of nonbanks in the mortgage servicing sector. Nonbanks gained a rapid share of mortgage servicing as well as loan origination following the financial crisis of 2008. In fact, when analyzing the loans serviced by the top 25 loan servicers in the nation, just 4.0% were serviced by nonbanks in 2008. The share jumped to 42.3% by 2018, according to the Fed. If the mortgage servicing industry experiences major disruption, the impact could be detrimental to the market. If mortgage servicers fail, struggling homeowners would have difficulty finding help. Also, as many companies both service and originate loans, homebuyers would have a harder time obtaining loans as the market begins to recover. Ultimately, the piece argues, “policymakers have a choice. They can step in now and address the massive cash-flow problem faced by mortgage servicers, either by advancing these payments directly to investors or by lending servicers the money to do it themselves.”Various government agencies have already been working to address this issue in recent weeks, with Ginnie Mae last week announcing an All Participants Memorandum that expanded its servicer assistance program in response to the spread of COVID-19.Editor’s note: DS News reached out to both the White House and HUD for comment on this piece. As of press time, we have not received a response. The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Krista Franks Brock is a professional writer and editor who has covered the mortgage banking and default servicing sectors since 2011. Previously, she served as managing editor of DS News and Southern Distinction, a regional lifestyle publication. Her work has appeared in a variety of print and online publications, including Consumers Digest, Dallas Style and Design, DS News and DSNews.com, MReport and theMReport.com. She holds degrees in journalism and art from the University of Georgia. Share Save in Daily Dose, Featured, Government, News forbearance programs housing market 2020 2020-04-13 Mike Albanese The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days agolast_img read more

Read More