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Understudy Joshua Dela Cruz Will Temporarily Take the Lead in Broadway’s Aladdin

first_img Aladdin Joshua Dela Cruz(Photo courtesy of Disney Theatrical Productions) Related Shows Aladdin understudy Joshua Dela Cruz will take center stage in the Disney musical on Broadway. He takes on the title role temporarily beginning February 14. Original star Adam Jacobs will take his final bow at the New Amsterdam Theatre on February 12 prior to reprising his performance in the national tour beginning April 11 in Chicago.A full-time replacement for Jacobs will be announced at a later date.Dela Cruz made his Broadway debut in the Casey Nicholaw-helmed Aladdin. His additional credits include Here Lies Love off-Broadway and Merrily We Roll Along at New York City Center.The current cast of Aladdin also includes Tony winner James Monroe Iglehart as Genie, Courtney Reed as Jasmine, Clifton Davis as Sultan, Jonathan Freeman as Jafar, Brian Gonzales as Babkak, Brad Weinstock as Omar, Steel Burkhardt as Kassim and Don Darryl Rivera as Iago.center_img View Comments from $57.50last_img read more

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Odds & Ends: John Mulaney Joins Fat Pig Reading & More

first_imgJohn Mulaney(Photo: Kevin Winter/Getty Images) Michael Pennington & More Join Donmar’s Brecht RebootMore news from across the pond! As previously reported, Clybourne Park Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Bruce Norris will produce a new translation of Bertolt Brecht’s The Resistible Rise of Arturo Ui with English comedian Lenny Henry making his Donmar debut in the titular role. Henry is joined by English Shakespeare Company co-founder Michael Pennington as well as Philip Cumbus, Lucy Eaton, Tom Edden, Lucy Ellinson, Simon Holland Roberts, Louis Martin, Justine Mitchell, Gloria Obianyo, Guy Rhys and Giles Terera. Performances are from April 21 through June 17. View Comments Here’s a quick roundup of stories you may have missed today.Oh, Hello’s John Mulaney Has Got the Theater BugAfter starring as the crotchety George St. Geegland in Broadway’s Oh, Hello, John Mulaney will participate in a benefit reading of Neil LaBute’s Fat Pig for MCC Theater. As previously announced, This Is Us breakout star Chrissy Metz will lead the reading, which will take place on March 5 at the Lucille Lortel Theatre. Ari Graynor and Mike Colter complete the cast. MCC presented the world premiere of the play, about a young professional and a plus-sized librarian navigating their relationship amidst ostracization from their friends, in 2004. This reading, directed by Andrew McCarthy (who appeared in the original production), will have a new ending.Lea Michele Releases New SingleMissing the sound of Lea Michele’s powerful pipes? The Spring Awakening and Glee fave released “Love Is Alive” on March 3. This is the first track to be revealed from her upcoming solo album Places, which will be released by Columbia Records later this year. All you Rachel Berry fans out there, get into it! Deborah Cox’s Album Has a Release DateIn other music news, we’re saving all our love for this album. As previously announced, The Bodyguard national tour star is releasing all of her songs from the musical. Deborah Cox: I Will Always Love You will drop on March 31. Fans can preorder the album on Broadway Records and Amazon. The tracklist includes Whitney Houston hits like “I’m Every Woman,” “I Wanna Dance with Somebody” and “I Will Always Love You.” Be sure to order the album, and then watch Cox belt her face off live on tour!Daniel Radcliffe Will Flip You For ItFive-time Broadway.com Audience Choice Award winner Daniel Radcliffe is currently starring in the Old Vic’s 50th-anniversary production of Tom Stoppard’s Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead. In a new trailer for the play, Radcliffe, who is playing Rosencrantz, and his co-star Joshua McGuire put their coin-flipping skills to the test. Based on Radcliffe’s track record, his heads or tails game is just as brilliant as Harry Potter’s Quidditch game. Take a look at the trailer below!last_img read more

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Flea-eating Nematodes

first_imgBig bugs eat little bugs. And sometimes it works the other way around. That’s how thefood chain works. So why not set the table for natural enemies to feed on your problemyard and garden insects? The notion is translating into some exciting — and unusual — products for sale. “Defenders of the garden, they call them,” said Maxcy Nolan, an entomologist with theUniversity of Georgia Extension Service. Certain weevils, nematodes, ladybugs and other creatures prey on other insects andplants. The idea is to release them into your yard or garden to control weeds, fleas,beetles, grubs and other pests. And research is showing that in many cases, they work. One new control method is to spread nematodes on your lawn to control fleas. Nolaninvestigated the claims. “I don’t know how available it is here,” he said. “But you can apply nematodes to youryard and they are effective against flea larvae. Many insects in some stage of their lifecycle are affected by some nematode.” But not just any nematode will do. Parasitic nematodes can control Japanese beetlegrubs, weevils, borers and flea larvae. You can order them in packages of 10 million. “They’re fairly expensive,” Nolan said. “But for people who want to go this route, costdoesn’t seem to bother them.” The key is to apply the nematodes when the ground is moist and warm. The best timeis May or June, Nolan said. Check with your local garden center or a mail-ordercatalog to order parasitic nematodes or other beneficial insects. “They’re getting more and more widely available,” he said. The scientific work that supports these claims has only been completed in the past fewyears. But it does show that “the right nematodes applied properly will control flealarvae,” Nolan said. Flea-eating nematodes are just one example. To learn more about this natural process,scientists are studying the tiniest links in the food chain throughout the world. They’relooking for ways to rely more on nature and less on pesticides. Since different geographic areas nurture various species of plants, insects and animals,researchers are finding some unusual natural controls. Some people fear releasing insects to control one problem may create another. Forinstance, some forms of nematodes attack field crops every year, forcing costlychemical controls. But Nolan said research doesn’t support that fear when using theproper one. “When you artificially produce a living organism to be used against another livingorganism, it cannot perpetuate itself,” he said. “You can use it in a given environment.But as soon as it destroys or consumes the other organism, if it doesn’t have any morefood, it dies.” Some argue that using natural controls is messing with the natural order. But Nolansaid it’s just speeding it up. “Even though Mother Nature has checks and balances, sometimes things get completelyout of hand before she applies her check for balance,” Nolan said. “People can’t alwayswait that long.”last_img read more

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Twice Landscape, Half Water

Abundant rainfall throughout most of Georgia this spring has landscapes growing like gangbusters. Unfortunately, too much rain in some areas has raised havoc with newly transplanted ornamentals. Junipers, in particular, have taken a beating. Junipers are extremely drought-tolerant once they’re established. But they can’t stand excessively wet soils for a long time. Too much water can lead to the long-term decline or death of landscape plants. In fact, more plants are killed each year in Georgia from too much water than from too little. Most well-established woody ornamental trees and shrubs can survive weeks without rain or irrigation. Light, frequent watering simply encourages root systems to grow near the soil surface. That makes them more susceptible to drought stress and winter injury. Without irrigation, roots will grow deeper and extend two to three times their canopy spread exploring for water and nutrients. Some herbaceous perennials actually prefer dry soils. Take purple coneflower, a plant native to the arid regions of the western United States. When irrigated, it tends to grow gangly, flop over and get powdery mildew disease. Without extra water, it thrives. Rudbeckia hirta is another great plant for a nonirrigated site. Even if it were to die during a long drought, it usually throws enough seed each year to provide many happy returns. Have you tried a plant called Gaura? It’s one of those “got-to-have-it” plants, particularly if you’re a low-maintenance gardener. In my landscape, it thrives on a harsh, dry site, blooming from May to October. I cut it back in midsummer to force new growth and repeat blooms. Otherwise, I ignore it. And it loves the lack of attention. Have you ever examined a day lily root and noticed the enlarged tuberous growths underground? These are like storage tanks of water and carbohydrates. They keep the plant thriving even during extended dry spells. Irrigating day lilies is a waste of time and water. It will only encourage aphids and spider mites. Perhaps only plastic plants are more drought-tolerant than ornamental grasses. Maiden grass, fountain grass and pampas grass are drought-tolerant machines. Their leaves may curl and turn bluish during drought, but they bounce right back with the first raindrops. It’s foolish to irrigate these plants. Although some plants are more water-efficient than others, plants alone don’t save water. It’s up to each of us. Our water resources are limited. If we’ll all be more conservative, summer water rationing and bans on outdoor watering don’t have to happen. It’s hard to imagine a drought when it’s been raining cats and dogs. But I can assure you it will turn dry again in Georgia, and you will be tempted to water. Please think before you do. Hand-watering container plants and annual flower beds will use less water than sprinkler irrigation. If you water in late evening or early morning, less water will evaporate. And mulching plants will keep the soil moist during dry times. If you’re irrigating more than 10 percent of your landscape, maybe it’s time to redesign it or change your watering habits. Through careful plant selection, siting plants right (as in sun or shade) and knowing plants’ water needs, most people can cut their water use by 30 percent to 50 percent without sacrificing the quality or beauty of their landscape. Having twice the landscape for half the water is a goal anyone can reach by learning simple ways to make every drop count. To learn more about saving water in the landscape, get a Guide to Developing a Water Wise Landscape, complete with a recommended plant list, for $3.95 from the Georgia Water Wise Council, 1033 Franklin Rd., Suite 9-187, Marietta, GA 30067-8004. read more

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Brave New Herd.

first_imgAfter almost two years of research, University of Georgia scientists have successfully cloned eight healthy calves.Unveiled at a June 26 press conference in Athens, the calves will help pave the way for improved cloning technology, say experts with the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.The improved technology, scientists say, will allow the livestock industry to efficiently meet consumers’ growing demand for consistent, quality meat products.”To produce offspring and develop methods to improve the efficiency of the cloning process has been our goal,” said Steve Stice, lead scientist for UGA cloning research.About 200 cloned embryos are produced in Stice’s lab each day. Only 10 to 20 percent of those embryos make it through the first seven days to be then transferred into recipient cows, he said.But with the development of the eight full-term, healthy calves, “we’ve shown significant improvement in the process,” Stice said. “We’re all very pleased.”Stice is a professor and Georgia Research Alliance eminent scholar with the UGA animal and dairy science department.Over-the-Hill Cow CloneThe calves are clones of a cow that had grown too old to reproduce but had desirable traits worth preserving, he said. The cloning process doesn’t change the genetic makeup. It repeats it, just like an identical twin in nature.”Improvement in the efficiency of cloning will allow us to reproduce those individuals, bulls or cows, that have lost the ability to reproduce because of age or accident,” said Larry Benyshek, CAES animal and dairy science department head.”If we can spread improved genetics at a faster rate,” Benyshek said, “this will be a great benefit for producers. That has ramifications for consumers and the public in general.”Cloning won’t replace sexual reproduction, the scientists say.Improvements Still NeededEstablished breeding programs lead to the genetic traits farmers want, such as quality consistent meat and better breeding and nurturing characteristics, Stice said. Cloning allows a way to more easily duplicate those traits.But there are still improvements to be made. “The next step is to take it further and make additional jumps in pregnancy rates,” Stice said.The UGA calves were cloned using technology developed in collaboration between the UGA animal and dairy science department and Athens-based ProLinia, Inc. The technology will be patented by UGA and licensed by ProLinia.Cloning BusinessProLinia is not only developing its own cloning technology but is also combining and cooperating with other companies to further develop of the cloning process, said ProLinia president Mike Wanner.One of the eight calves was cloned using a combination of the technology developed in Athens with technology developed by Geron, the company that produced Dolly the sheep, Wanner said.”We were very pleased with the results with a (cloning) process that has not been used before,” Wanner said.Consumers should be able to find out easily the animal’s breed and genetics and what it was fed, Wanner said.”There is a need for consumers to know when they’re at the meat counter exactly what kind of meat they’re buying,” he said. Consumer Is King”The cattle industry is becoming more and more a consumer-driven industry,” Benyshek said. “Everybody realizes that in today’s market, the consumer is the king. … Genetics has an important part to play in improving those qualities (the consumer wants). We know we can do that.”Cloning, like the research done in Athens, could help the livestock industry meet the consumer demand for niche markets for specific products, Benyshek said.”It gives us another tool to enhance and provide a way to further spread desirable genetics and meet the demand,” he said.’Fantastic Breakthrough'”I’m excited about it,” Benyshek said. “It (the cloned calves) was a fantastic breakthrough. It’s right in line with many breakthroughs in animal biotechnology. It will be very good for animal production for Georgia, the country and the world.””The demand for animal products is directly proportional to the economic well-being for humans,” Benyshek said. “We’ll have to become more efficient so there is more product to meet demand without harming the environment and to allow us to produce more on a smaller quantity of land. This research is certainly a step in that direction.” By Brad Hairelast_img read more

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Grape Prices.

first_imgIt used to be a no-brainer. Commercial muscadine vineyards could get as much as 65 cents to 90 cents a pound for wholesale fresh-market grapes but only $180 to $200 a ton (9 cents to 10 cents a pound) for processing-market grapes.Growing muscadine table grapes for the fresh market still has potential in some markets. But this past season, growers had a hard time moving some of our fresh-market grapes.Some growers ended up selling some grapes for only $8 a box (40 cents a pound). And they’ve got about $5 a box in them, so there’s not much room for profit.At the same time, the market for processing-market grapes has improved. The price has doubled to around $400 a ton (20 cents a pound). An increase in the number of wineries in the Southeast is improving demand.Grape Roller CoasterHowever, growers should never plant muscadines without extensive market research. We’ve been on this roller coaster before, back in the 1970s. Prices for processed muscadines were good and then crashed.A bright spot in the picture is the discovery of high levels of antioxidants in muscadines. Casimir Akoh’s research at UGA has shown high levels of the antioxidant and anti-cancer compound ellagic acid in muscadines.Hopefully, as the health benefits of muscadine grapes become common knowledge, the markets for both fresh and processed muscadines will increase. Chock-Full of Nutrients last_img read more

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Trophy meal

first_imgBy Dan RahnUniversity of GeorgiaFor a deer hunter, a mounted trophy buck is the prize of alifetime, the result of years of relentless tracking, studyingsigns, honing skills and finally bagging the perfect specimen forthe den wall. For carpet beetles, it’s just lunch.”Carpet beetles, or dermestids, eat anything of animal origin –fur, feathers, skin,” said Dan Suiter, a University of GeorgiaExtension Service entomologist.”Since it’s deer and duck season right now, I suspect somesuccessful hunters will be mounting their trophy bucks,” Suitersaid. “It’d be a shame if they didn’t protect them in futureyears from dermestids.”Dermestids (der-MESS-tids) are small, fairly innocent-lookingbeetles. About three-sixteenths of an inch long, the adults areoval insects that look a little like ladybugs with fall sweaterson.The larvae are about the same size — one-eighth tothree-sixteenths of an inch long and hairy. They look somethinglike miniature woolly bear caterpillars.Fairly commonAnd they’re fairly common. If you look closely enough, you mayfind them along the baseboards, quietly feeding on human or pethair, insects or other dead animal matter. “They’re a lot morecommon than most people would think,” Suiter said.Now that lady beetles are congregating inside houses in thewinter, he said, he’s finding dermestids feeding on the deadbeetles. “You can find them inside lights, too, in globes thatcollect dead insects,” he said.(Museums with large insect collections must periodicallyfumigate, he said, at great expense to keep their inventoriesfrom disappearing. Other museums, though, use dermestids to getprized bones pristinely clean.)The larvae do the most feeding damage. Fortunately, they’re notinto fast food. “They move slowly,” Suiter said. “You don’tnotice they’re there. Then one day you look closely at thatmounted trophy and realize the fur or the feathers have beeneaten away.”Second waveTheir moseying pace puts them in the second wave of carrionfeeders in nature, he said. Flies and other faster creatures getthe fleshy parts, and the dermestids clean up the rest.Dermestids can make a meal of wool clothes, fabrics and anythingelse of animal origin, he said. They probably owe their commonname, Suiter said, to the damage they did to rugs and carpetswhen they were more often made of wool and other animal fibers.”Most carpets are synthetic fibers now,” he said. “So dermestidsdon’t bother them. We don’t have much trouble with clothes moths,either, because so many fabrics are synthetic now.”For people who have mounted deer, turkeys, ducks or otheranimals, it’s a good idea to know what the taxidermist has doneto discourage dermestids.”Some of them insert moth balls inside the mount,” Suiter said.”And that works. But even then, eventually the moth balls willdissipate, and if you’re not checking closely, you can end upwith a lot of damage.”Check closelyIt’s best, he said, to check closely every few months for signsof damage. If you find signs of dermestid feeding, you have twomain choices.”If it’s a small item, you can just put it into a freezer for twoor three days,” Suiter said. “That will kill the insects.”If it’s too large for that, some pest-control companies havefumigation rooms where, for a fee, they can fumigate your trophymount and get rid of the dermestids.”There aren’t a lot of companies that have those rooms, though,”he said. “So you have to look for them.”(Dan Rahn is a news editor with the University of GeorgiaCollege of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.)last_img read more

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Backyard pecans

first_imgBy Lenny WellsUniversity of GeorgiaGeorgia is blessed with a great climate for growing pecans, andpecan trees are a common sight in yards statewide. But while theycan offer shade, tasty treats or extra income, many come up shortbecause of diseases and insects that thrive here, too.Two problems particularly plague backyard pecan trees: pecanaphids and a disease called pecan scab.Yellow pecan aphids rob nutrients and water from pecan leaves.They also produce a syrup-like solution called honeydew, whichcoats the leaves and drips down onto cars and houses, where anunsightly fungus called sooty mold develops. Large populationsoften cause trees to shed leaves in late summer, too.Culprits get worseThe damage inflicted by black pecan aphids is much worse. Theseinsects remove nutrients and water from the tree’s leaves, too,but in doing so they release a toxin into the plant.This toxin causes the leaves to develop bright yellow spots,eventually killing that area of the leaf and turning it brown.When populations are heavy, black pecan aphids can defoliate atree.As bad as aphids are, though, the main reason backyard trees failto produce pecans is pecan scab. This disease develops andspreads during rainy time, particularly when the nut is growing.Nuts infected with pecan scab develop black spots on the shuck.Many will be covered so the entire nut turns black and fallsbefore it’s fully developed.Ways to improveCompletely removing and destroying the leaves and shucks on whichthe disease overwinters can help reduce the carry-over of scaband other diseases. Removing low limbs can allow greater airflow, too, which helps to reduce the leaf wetness necessary forinfection.In most cases, none of these problems can be controlled byspraying pesticides on large, backyard pecan trees.Pecan varieties, however, do vary in their susceptibility tothese problems, so take care to choose trees wisely.Elliott is probably the idealbackyard pecan. It has the best scab resistance available andproduces excellent quality nuts. Its small, teardrop-shaped nutfills easily. It often brings a premium price because of itsplump, perfect halves.The main problems with Elliott are that it may bear nuts onlyevery other year and can suffer from black and yellow aphidproblems. It is, however, relatively drought-tolerant for a pecantree.Sumner suffers less from scab thanmany varieties. However, it’s highly susceptible to damage fromblack pecan aphids. Sumner has large nuts with well-developedkernels. It produces lots of pecans at a young age, and is arelatively consistent producer.Stuart offers some level of scabcontrol, too, although the nuts will scab under heavy diseasepressure during wet weather. Many of the old yard trees inGeorgia are Stuarts.These trees usually don’t suffer as much from black pecan aphidsas some other varieties do. But they often harbor largepopulations of yellow aphids. Stuarts have large nuts withwell-filled kernels that shell easily. And they produce fairlyregularly.Choosing the right variety for your yard may not eliminateproblems with pecans. But it can certainly make problems lessfrequent.To learn more about growing pecans and about many otheragricultural topics, contact your county UGACooperative Extension agent.(Lenny Wells is the University of Georgia CooperativeExtension state pecan horticulturist and a Dougherty Countyextension agent with the UGA College of Agricultural andEnvironmental Sciences.)last_img read more

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17 Gold Medal

first_imgChinese Snowball viburnum(Viburnum macrocephalum ‘Sterile’) is a large, deciduousshrub that grows 10 to 15 feet tall with an equal spread. Theshowy white flower clusters, up to 8 inches across, look likegiant snowballs, offering a virtual whiteout of flowers. Theflowers emerge green, then gradually fade to pure white.Eventually, they become light brown. They’re commonly cut andused, both fresh and dried, in floral arrangements. Amethyst Falls wisteria(Wisteria frutescens ‘Amethyst Falls’), is an improvedcultivar of our native American wisteria. It will climb 20 to 30feet. But it’s less vigorous, less invasive and much easier tomanage than its Asian relatives. And while the Asian types maytake 10 years or more to begin flowering, Amethyst Fallswisteria’s fragrant, lavender-blue flowers start cascading fromthe foliage at 1 year old.To learn more about on the Georgia Gold Medal Winners program,visit the Web at www.georgiagoldmedal.com. The site shows theplants the GPSC has chosen since 1994.(Dan Rahn is a news editor with the University of GeorgiaCollege of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.) By Dan RahnUniversity of GeorgiaFor 13 years now, the Georgia Plant Selections Committee, Inc.,has been recommending each year a new, short list of beautiful,proven landscape plants. Cuphea species are dependable,low-maintenance annuals. They tolerate the heat and humidity ofthe South with extended bloom periods, attracting butterflies andhummingbirds like magnets. Three stand out. Firecracker plant (Cuphea ignea),about a foot tall, has abundant tubular, scarlet-red flowersedged in black. Tiny mice(Cuphea llavea), up to 2 feet tall, has flowers resemblingthe face of a mouse, with two red petals tinged in purple. Andtall cigar plant (Cupheamicropetala) grows 3 to 5 feet tall with 2-inch-long,cigar-shaped, red-yellow-green blooms. Perennial plumbago(Ceratostigma plumbaginoides) grows just 6 to 10 inchestall and spreads 1 to 2 feet wide. A terrific groundcover, ittolerates drought and deer and has a long bloom period. The plantdies back to the ground each year, then leafs out late in thespring, with shiny green leaves that turn bronze-red in the fall.Its medium-blue flowers emerge in late summer and keep cominguntil the fall frost.center_img Volume XXXINumber 1Page 17 The committee, an elite group of people who are experts in theplant and landscape business, was organized in 1994 to break up avicious plant cycle: Deserving plants remained little knownbecause no nurseries propagated them, because no customers askedfor them, because they were relatively unknown. …Each year the committee selects one plant from five classes –annual, perennial, shrub, tree and vine — from a long list ofnominees and awards them Georgia Gold Medals.”The selection process is tedious, sometimes resulting in heateddebates prior to the final secret ballot,” said Gary Wade, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension horticulturist whohelped get the program started. “But the cream always rises tothe top. In the end, the honors are always well deserved.”The committee decides the winners based on seasonal interest,outstanding or unusual qualities, ease of propagation, hardiness,adaptability, durability, pest tolerance and lack of invasiveness.They announce the winners first to growers so they can have themavailable when the public promotions begin.Here are the 2006 Georgia Gold Medal winners: Overcup oak (Quercuslyrata) grows well on dry, upland sites and adapts to manysoils and growing environments. It also grows fast, particularlywhen it’s young. It typically grows 50 feet high and equally widebut has been known to reach 125 feet in the wild. Its acorns, withwarty caps almost covering the nut are a good food source forwildlife.last_img read more

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14 Heavenly flowers

first_imgFollow your nose to Paperbush (Edgeworthia chrysantha), and it will be one of those gotta-have-it plants for your landscape. Its heavenly scent blankets the midwinter landscape, quickly drawing you to the source: Clusters of creamy yellow flowers cascade downward from dark brown stems.You’ll want to touch the flowers to assure yourself they are real.They are. The plant is so impressive that judges named paperbush the 2008 Georgia Gold Medal winner for deciduous shrubs.Paperbush has a somewhat tropical appearance and coarse-textured summer foliage. The foliage is bluish-green on top and silver-green below. The shrub reaches approximately 4 to 6 feet tall. As fall approaches, the older foliage gradually turns yellow and drops. It then sheds its remaining foliage after the first hard freeze, exposing the emerging flower buds. The young flower buds are silvery in appearance, turning white as they expand and then creamy yellow when open. The flowers consist of dozens of tiny florets borne in clusters, suspended like bells on short stalks. Smooth, chocolate-brown bark creates a striking contrast to the flowers. The dark-colored, leafless stems also add a dramatic silhouette to the winter landscape, particularly when they are backed by evergreens. Paperbush likes its habitat just right. It prefers filtered shade and moist, well-drained soils to grow and perform well. It does not like drought or wet feet. It does best in zones 7 to 10.Adding organic matter to the planting and mulch over the soil surface is recommended. Paperbush is a plant for all seasons. Enjoy its showy, fragrant flowers and attractive bark from December to February and its bold, pest-free foliage from March to October. Volume XXXIIINumber 1Page 14 By Gary WadeUniversity of Georgialast_img read more

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