Tri-country collaboration to eradicate carambola fruit fly

first_imgGuyana, Brazil and Suriname are collaborating to eradicate the carambola fruit fly, which plagues agricultural produce and poses economic and environmental challenges in the Region.NAREI CEO, Dr Oudho HomenauthAt a workshop hosted by the Inter-American Institute for Cooperation on Agriculture (IICA) on Wednesday, National Agricultural and Research Extension Institute (NAREI) Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Dr Oudho Homenauth said the exercise was centred on the elimination of the carambola fruit fly, which poses a serious threat. Dr Homenauth is of the view that there is a need for collaboration to effectively address the issue.“It is recognised that no one country in the Region can seriously manage the pest problem. We all have to work together. So, it is imperative that our efforts be combined; and the three countries – that is Guyana, Suriname and Brazil – have agreed to work together to have a unified approach to make a difference,” Dr Homenauth is quoted by the Department of Public Information (DPI) as saying.The NAREI CEO said that as Guyana continued to expand its non-traditional agricultural sector, systems needed to be in place to protect crops.That was seconded by Permanent Secretary in the Agriculture Ministry, Delma Nedd, who noted the effects of the carambola fruit fly on Guyana’s agricultural development. She said studies show the fly was responsible for as much as 50 per cent yield loss of the carambola crop.“The increased movement of people and commodities, along with the porosity of Guyana’s border, increases the likelihood for the introduction and establishment of plant pests and diseases. Therefore, the implementation of concerted pest eradication efforts among Guyana, Brazil and Suriname, will alleviate the challenges faced in the control and eradication of the carambola fruit fly.”Nedd added that the Agriculture Ministry will continue its monitoring and assessment to eradicate the agricultural pest.last_img read more

Deal puts company in employees’ hands

first_imgFor the past six months, many of the 20,000 employees of Tribune Co. have been wondering who their new owners would be. Turns out the answer is, basically, them. The deal announced Monday to take the Chicago-based media company private will result in Tribune being owned by an employee stock ownership plan, or ESOP. These plans have many advantages including significant tax breaks, but they also carry certain risks. Here’s how they work: An ESOP is a kind of benefit plan for employees, where the company contributes money, as it would to a pension or similar kind of retirement savings account. But instead of investing in stocks or bonds, as most pension plans might, an ESOP plan will use those contributions to pay down debt and buy stock in the company, which is then distributed to employees as a benefit. The new ESOP-owned Tribune will have about $13.4 billion in debt after the deal, Bear Stearns analyst Alexia Quadrani said, up from about $5 billion now. Real estate investor Sam Zell is contributing $315 million to the transaction and will wind up with the right to buy 40percent of the company later. Since ESOPs act as a kind of retirement benefit plan, company contributions to ESOP plans are essentially tax-free. This allows the company to pay down the debt more quickly. As the debt is paid down, employees will gradually receive shares in the company as a benefit, and they won’t owe tax on those shares until they leave the company or retire and cash them out. And, to the extent a company is owned by an ESOP program, profits aren’t taxed either. In order for the ESOP to be created, an independent trustee must vet the transaction and make sure it’s fair to the employees relative to what Zell is getting, and also whether the price being paid by the ESOP is justifiable given the expected future profits of the company. Tribune said in a statement that there would be no change in the pension benefits previously earned by employees as a result of the transaction. The new ESOP will be funded solely through company contributions. It all may sound quite appealing, but there are several cases of ESOPs that went wrong, some spectacularly so. UAL Corp.’s United Airlines adopted an ESOP structure in 1994, but employees suffered steep losses after the company declared bankruptcy in 2002. Corey Rosen, an expert on ESOPs and the founder and executive director of the National Center for Employee Ownership, an Oakland-based nonprofit organization, says several missteps were made in the United case. Those mistakes included putting a time limit on the ESOP structure, giving employees less incentive to support it, and also extracting significant concessions from workers at the outset, which worsened labor relations and helped set the stage for a crippling work slowdown in 2000. Also, the flight attendants’ union opted out of the agreement. Rosen pointed to several examples of successful ESOPs, including Publix Super Markets Inc., a fast-growing and highly regarded grocery chain based in Lakeland, Fla., as well as W.L. Gore & Associates Inc., the Newark, Del.-based maker of waterproof fabric Gore-Tex. While the tax benefits are compelling, Rosen cautioned that employee-owned business also need to foster a collaborative, “open-book” management culture where the employees do feel like owners – something that didn’t work out with United Airlines. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more