North Goa police crack the whip ondrug menace, ban late-night parties

first_imgNorth Goa Superintendent of Police Chandan Choudhury on Monday banned music events and rave parties after 10 p.m. to crack down on drugs sold at late-night parties in the State.On Monday evening, Ms. Choudhury said, “In the coming days, no party will be allowed in open places after 10 p.m. Where there is music, there is possibility of drugs and over-consumption of liquor. So we will make sure the time limit is adhered to.”Ms. Choudhury was speaking after attending a high-level meeting chaired by Chief Minister Manohar Parrikar following the death of two youths from Tamil Nadu and Kerala. They were found dead on Sunday morning after attending two separate parties at Anjuna in North Goa.Pravin Surendran from Tamil Nadu and Nidam Abdulla from Kerala died at a private hospital in Anjuna after they were admitted after suspected overdose of drugs. Ms. Choudhury said drug overdose cannot be ruled out from the case. She said, “Drugs are freely available to youngsters who come over from Kerala, Bengaluru and Hyderabad. Party drugs have been recovered from young tourists who visited the State during long weekends.”Ms. Choudhury said the North Goa police and the Anjuna police jointly conducted a crackdown on Sunday evening in Anjuna and Vagator and arrested Achinto Rup Banerjee (20) from Visakhapatnam with drugs worth ₹20,000.last_img read more

Over 20 kg tobacco products confiscated from Lucknow Metro commuters

first_imgIn the City of Nawabs, security officials deployed at the Lucknow Metro stations are on a task to sniff out tobacco from commuters and have weeded out over 20 kg tobacco products in the first two days of its launch. Metro passengers in the city have been trying various tricks to smuggle tobacco and related products inside coaches. “The passengers, who are in the habit of carrying tobacco products, are not ready to give up and try to smuggle it pan masala and other products in their pockets, socks and belts,” a security personnel deployed at the Charbagh Metro Station said.“During frisking while entering Metro premises, officials were able to collect approximately 20 kg tobacco and other related items like pan, pan masala, cigarette etc. from commuters,” LMRC MD Kumar Keshav said. The confiscated items will be handed over to the municipal corporation for disposal.“I am very thankful to commuters for their cooperation in frisking and keeping the metro clean. Lucknow Metro is a green and environment friendly public transport and it is our duty to keep it clean. The efforts of LMRC and public will definitely help in keeping metro a clean public transport,” the MD said.Many of those caught gave excuses that they were not aware that tobacco products were not allowed inside the metro. “Out of five, every third commuter was carrying a tobacco product and was found chewing tobacco. It is a difficult task to check them. But we are on our toes and committed to keep the metro clean,” a security member said. The 8.5-km-long ‘Priority Corridor’ from Transport Nagar to Charbagh, which is part of the Phase 1 of the project, is operational from 6 am to 10 pm everyday.Over 32,000 passengers had boarded Lucknow Metro on the first day of the commercial run on September 6 while the number came down to over 28,000 on the second day.LMRC has set a target to complete the entire 23 km track from Amausi to Munshipulia by March 2019. This includes a 3.5 km underground track between Hussainganj to Hazratganj.last_img read more

Bid to check illegal sale of liquor

first_imgIn an attempt to clamp down on illegal sale and smuggling of liquor in the State, the Haryana government has decided to set up an enforcement wing which will be headed by the Excise and Taxation Commissioner.State Additional Chief Secretary (Excise and Taxation Department) Sanjeev Kaushal said on Monday that though the department along with the police has been carrying out enforcement activities throughout the State, the setting up of an enforcement wing would go a long way in keeping a check on illegal sale and smuggling of liquor.Under the State’s excise policy for the year 2018-19, Mr. Kaushal announced an increase in the basic quota of country liquor from 950 lakh proof litres to 1,000 lakh proof litres and of Indian Made Foreign Liquor from 550 lakh proof litres to 600 lakh proof litres.Retail outlets“The number of retail outlets for CL and IMFL would remain the same as 2017-18,” he said.Mr. Kaushal said under the new policy, a licencee has been allowed to convert a maximum of 10% of his CL quota to IMFL quota. “The excise duty on CL has been increased from ₹28 to ₹44 per PL this year, whereas on IMFL it has been increased from ₹44-200 per PL to ₹49-210 per PL. However, there is no hike in the annual fee of bar licences in the form of L-4 and L-5 granted to restaurants and hotels of three-star ratings and above,” he added.Terming the year 2017-18 successful in terms of excise revenue, Mr. Kaushal said the State is expected to earn a revenue of ₹5,682 crore, including VAT, up to February this year. “The excise revenue of the State for the year 2016-17 was 11.71%, which has been increased to 13% in the year 2017-18,” he said.Mr. Kaushal added that the number of liquor vends has been brought down to 2,323.last_img read more

Mamata Banerjee to go live on Facebook

first_imgA day after massive outpouring of criticism against the ruling Trinamool Congress for turning violent to stop the Opposition from filing nomination papers and targeting journalists, party chief and West Bengal Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee has decided to go live on Facebook on April 24 evening.She is expected to take direct questions and provide an argument related to violence in the run up to State’s rural polls.She did live chat on Facebook earlier during the 2016 Assembly election. Ms. Banerjee has over 27 lakh ‘likes’ on her Facebook page.While the dates of the rural polls are yet to be announced, the nomination filing process was completed on April 23. Many of her Facebook followers have already posted comments on her page on various issues ranging from State’s development hurdles, the Trinamool’s role in national politics to poll-related violence in Bengal, following her announcement.last_img read more

Manipur ‘fake’ encounter case: Supreme Court pulls up Defence Ministry

first_imgThe Supreme Court has expressed its displeasure that the Ministry of Defence has “not even bothered” to respond to the letters addressed to it by the CBI’s special investigation team (SIT) that is probing the alleged extra-judicial killings and fake encounters by the Army, Assam Rifles and the police in Manipur. A Bench comprising justices Madan B. Lokur and U.U. Lalit asked the SIT to conclude by June 30 its investigations in the cases related to the National Human Rights Commission (NHRC), judicial inquiries and those on which the Gauhati High court had given its findings. Additional Solicitor General (ASG) Maninder Singh, appearing for the CBI, told the Bench that he would take up the matter with the Ministry of Defence to ensure necessary cooperation.“We have also seen from status report no. five (filed by the SIT) that letters have been addressed by the SIT to the Ministry of Defence in some cases as far back as in February, 2018 but the Ministry of Defence has not even bothered to respond to those letters,” the Bench noted in its order.“The ASG says he will take it up with the Ministry of Defence and ensure that necessary cooperation is extended and letters will be responded with promptitude. We expect the Ministry of Defence to fully cooperate with the SIT,” the court said and listed the matter for hearing on July 2.Mr. Singh told the court that the SIT would give a list of documents to the Chief Secretary and the Director General of Police (DGP) of Manipur.last_img read more

Haryana govt. puts absentee women councillors on notice

first_imgHaryana Urban Local Bodies Minister Kavita Jain said on Monday that the State government has decided to remove women councillors if they personally remain absent for more than three consecutive meetings of the municipalities.“The decision has been taken to prevent the practice of proxy attendance by relatives of women councillors in the meetings of municipalities. It has been noticed that the practice has been increasing,” she said.Ms. Jain said the State government was giving impetus to ensure increased participation of women in politics and in decision-making so as to empower them.“At present, 42% representation in municipalities is that of women. If instead of raising their voices, they allow their relatives to do so, their political abilities would not develop and grow. Hence, the spirit of the initiative taken by the government to politically empower them would be completely lost,” she said.She said directions pertaining to the order have been issued to all the commissioners of municipal corporations, executive officers of municipal councils and secretaries of municipal committees.last_img read more

2 States’ officials to meet today

first_imgOfficials of West Bengal and Jharkhand will meet on Wednesday in a bid to end the impasse over the painting of a part of the Massanjore Dam in the shades of white and blue. The two States have been at loggerheads since Friday when West Bengal’s TMC government painted the walls of the dam situated in Dumka district in Jharkhand where the BJP is in power. In retaliation, the Bharatiya Janata Yuva Morcha (BJYM), BJP’s youth wing, erased ‘Bengal’ and painted ‘Jharkhand’ on a dam gate. They also covered the Biswa Bangla logo with a Jharkhand one, media reports said. West Bengal Irrigation Minister Soumen Mahapatra said in Kolkata on Tuesday that a meeting was likely to take place on Wednesday. A senior official of the Irrigation Department and District Magistrates of Birbhum and Dumka would meet to find out a solution to the issue, Mr. Mahapatra said. “At the moment there is no problem here. There will be a meeting tomorrow regarding the issue and hopefully it will be resolved,” Mr. Mahapatra added. The Minister had earlier asserted that the dam was maintained by his government, and “nobody had any right” to stop its workers from the carrying out the work. Refusing to back down, BJP Dumka MLA and Jharkhand Minister Louis Marandi had on Sunday threatened to “gouge out eyes” of those who dared to look at the barrage.last_img read more

Odisha’s revenue jumps by 33%

first_imgOdisha’s revenue collection has jumped by 33% to ₹13,015 crore till July end this fiscal compared to ₹9,807 crore during the corresponding period last year.The revenue from the State’s own tax sources during the current fiscal has grown by 27% with total collection of ₹9,536 crore, and the revenue from non-tax sources has grown by 51% with a total collection of ₹3,479 crore, according to a statement issued by the State government. “The revenue generation from mining royalty and vehicle taxes has shown highest increase of around 72% and 42% respectively. The total collection from mining royalty has been around ₹3,039 crore against last year’s collection of ₹1,769 crore till July end. Similarly, the revenue collection from vehicle tax has grown from ₹404 crore to ₹571 crore during the same period,” it said Fund collection As far as the District Mineral Fund collection is concerned, Odisha has generated ₹5,013 crore up to July. “So far, 8,163 projects in the sectors of physical infrastructure, irrigation, energy, watershed, afforestation and others have been sanctioned under the fund. Around ₹3,047 crore has already been allotted against these projects,” a government source said.last_img read more

NGT seeks report on plastic units

first_imgFollowing a plea seeking a ban on a plastic manufacturing unit in Haridwar, the National Green Tribunal has directed the State pollution control board to submit a report on the same.A Bench headed by NGT chairperson Justice Adarsh Kumar Goel said: “Allegation in the letter, which has been treated as an application, is that plastic manufacturing is taking place in Haridwar even though there is a ban of plastic in the State.”Directing the State pollution control board to take action, the green panel said: “Let the Uttarakhand State Pollution Control Board furnish a report on the factual aspects and action taken, if any, to this tribunal.”’last_img read more

Stellar Trio Could Put Einstein’s Theory of Gravity to the Test

first_imgIn a cosmic coup, astronomers have found a celestial beacon known as a pulsar in orbit with not one, but two other stars. The first-of-its-kind trio could soon be used to put Einstein’s theory of gravity, or general relativity, to an unprecedented test. “It’s a wonderful laboratory that nature has given us,” says Paulo Freire, a radio astronomer at the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy in Bonn, Germany, who was not involved in the work. “It’s almost made to order.”A pulsar consists of a neutron star, the leftover core of a massive star that has blown up in a supernova explosion. The core’s own gravity squeezes it so intensely that the atomic nuclei meld into a single sphere of neutrons. The spinning neutron star also shines out a beam of radio waves that sweeps the sky just as the light beam from a lighthouse sweeps the sea. In fact, pulsars flash so regularly that they make natural timepieces whose ticking can be as steady as that of an atomic clock.The incredible regularity makes it possible to determine whether the pulsar is in orbit with another object, as roughly 80% of the more than 300 fast-spinning “millisecond” pulsars are known to be. As the pulsar and its companion orbit each other, the distance between the pulsar and Earth varies slightly, so that it takes more or less time for the pulses of radio waves to reach Earth. As a result, the frequency of pulsing speeds up and slows down in a telltale cycle.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)But such a simple scenario couldn’t explain the peculiar warbles in the frequency of pulsar PSR J0337+1715, which Scott Ransom, an astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Charlottesville, Virginia, and colleagues discovered in 2007 with the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope in West Virginia. Training other radio telescopes on the object, Ransom and colleagues kept it under near-constant surveillance for a year and a half. Eventually, Anne Archibald, a graduate student at McGill University in Montreal, Canada, figured out exactly what’s going on.The pulsar, which has 1.4 times the sun’s mass and spins 366 times a second, is in a tight orbit lasting 1.6 days with a white dwarf star only 20% as massive as the sun. A second white dwarf that weighs 41% as much as the sun orbits the inner pair every 327 days, as Ransom and colleagues report online today in Nature. “We think that there are not more than 100 of these [trios] in our galaxy,” Ransom says. “They really are one-in-a-billion objects.”The distinctive new system opens the way for testing a concept behind general relativity known as the equivalence principle, which relates two different conceptions of mass. An object’s inertial mass quantifies how it resists pushing or pulling: It’s easier to start a stroller rolling than a car because the stroller has less inertial mass. A thing’s gravitational mass determines how much a gravitational field pulls on it: A barbell is heavier than a feather because it has more gravitational mass.The simplest version of the equivalence principle says inertial mass and gravitational mass are equal. It explains why ordinary objects like baseballs and bricks fall to Earth at the same rate regardless of their mass—as legend claims Galileo showed by dropping heavier and lighter balls from the Leaning Tower of Pisa.The strong equivalence principle takes things an important step further. According to Einstein’s famous equation, E = mc2, energy equals mass. So an object or system’s mass can be generated by the energy in the gravitational fields within the system itself. The strong equivalence principle states that even if one includes mass generated through such “self-gravitation,” gravitational and inertial mass are still equal. The principle holds in Einstein’s theory of general relativity but typically does not hold in alternative theories, says Thibault Damour, a theoretical physicist at the Institute for Advanced Scientific Studies in Bures-sur-Yvette, France. So poking a pin in the principle would prove that general relativity is not the final word on gravity.Researchers have already tried to test the strong equivalence principle. Since the 1970s, some have compared how the moon and Earth orbit in the gravitational field of the sun. More recently, others have analyzed the motion of pulsar–white dwarf pairs in the gravitational field of the galaxy. But those studies have been limited, Damour says. Earth’s self-gravitation accounts for just a billionth of its mass. In pulsar studies, the galaxy’s gravity is very weak. So the strong equivalence principle has been tested only to a precision of parts per thousand.The new pulsar system opens the way to a much more stringent test by combining the strengths of the two previous methods. The self-gravitation of the pulsar accounts for roughly 10% of its mass, in contrast to less than 0.001% for the inner white dwarf. At the same time, both move in the gravitational field of the outer white dwarf, which is much stronger than the field of the galaxy. By tracking the system’s evolution, Ransom and colleagues should be able to tell whether either the inner white dwarf or the pulsar falls faster toward the outer white dwarf and test strong equivalence about 100 times as precisely as before, Damour says.So will strong equivalence principle be found wanting? “I would rather expect to get a better limit” on possible violations, Damour says. “But I’m open-minded. It would be great to get a violation.” Freire says a violation would be “a complete revolution.”Researchers may not have to wait long, Ransom says. His team should be able to test the principle within a year.last_img read more

South America’s Hidden Epidemic

first_imgThe Spanish Conquest brought smallpox and measles epidemics that decimated the peoples of the New World. But another pathogen arrived with the colonists, the bacterium called Helicobacter pylori, and new research may explain why it has quietly wreaked havoc in the stomachs of some in the Americas ever since.More than half of all humans carry H. pylori, and the microbe seems to protect against childhood asthma and esophageal cancer. Yet it causes stomach ulcers and is responsible for 80% to 90% of all stomach cancers, making it the world’s second leading cause of cancer mortality, after tobacco. Not everyone harboring the microbe develops stomach cancer, however; in certain parts of the world—much of Africa, for example—such cancers are rare even though many people harbor H. pylori. Microbiologists call this “the African enigma.”So, why are some hit much harder than others by H. pylori? A group led by researchers at Vanderbilt University in Nashville has been exploring that question in Colombia. The team had previously found that stomach cancer rates in Túquerres, a mountain town in the Andes, were about 150/100,000, compared with 6/100,000 in Tumaco, a coastal city.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)In the new study, the team conducted genetic analyses of 121 people from each town who had sought medical attention for stomach pain. The study confirmed that the DNA of the coastal people was largely of African origin; the mountain group, on the other hand, was on average two-thirds Amerindian and a third European, with small traces of African DNA.The researchers also examined the DNA of the H. pylori specimens collected from the 242 individuals. The bacterium, which has colonized humans for more than 60,000 years, has evolved into distinct strains reflecting its history, such as whether it came from Europe or Africa.  Both coastal and mountain groups were colonized with H. pylori strains that had DNA segments of both African and European origin.Whether they lived in the mountains or the coast, the people of Amerindian descent carrying largely African strains of H. pylori were five times more likely to have gastric cancer or precancerous lesions than were people of largely African descent who carried similar strains, the group reports online today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.Scientists had not previously examined the role that coevolution of host and organism might play in the H. pylori-connected stomach cancer. “We looked at both the bug and the people infected with it,” says study co-author Barbara Schneider, a Vanderbilt molecular biologist. “It turns out that African ancestry in H. pylori strains, combined with Native American ancestry in humans, is a bad combination.”Those in Tumaco, however, may enjoy their relative protection against stomach cancer because their African ancestors, on the other hand, apparently coevolved with their strains of H. pylori in ways that minimized the carcinogenic effects.The researchers don’t know why people of Amerindian descent are more susceptible to the African H. pylori sequences. Some H. pylori strains contain a set of genes that create a needlelike structure that deposits a cancerous protein called CagA into human cells. These strains are especially carcinogenic. In the Vanderbilt study, however, the impact of combined Amerindian host ancestry and African H. pylori ancestry was five times stronger than that of being infected with a strain that has the CagA-associated genes. One H. pylori interaction may be with diet. The coastal people eat more fresh fruits and vegetables and fish than the more cancer-prone residents of the Andes.The findings could help fight stomach cancer by offering a way to determine who is at risk from H. pylori infection. More at-risk people could be treated with antibiotics or monitored for gastric lesions that may lead to cancer.“H. pylori is mostly harmless but it can be deadly,” says infectious disease specialist Jay Solnick of the University of California, Davis, who was not involved in the research. “We’ve been looking for many years for biomarkers of who should be treated or screened intensively. This could help.”last_img read more

The Lassie effect: Movies drive our preference for certain dog breeds

first_imgMovies, scientists know, can turn us into smokers and drinkers. Now, it turns out, they also make us buy dogs. Not any old dog, of course, but the particular breed of dog that starred in last night’s feature film. To make the discovery, researchers analyzed 87 movies that featured pooches and correlated those findings with data from the American Kennel Club, which maintains a registry of more than 65 million dogs. They discovered that films can increase the popularity of the dog star’s breed for up to 10 years. The effect on dogs has been huge. For instance, the 1943 hit Lassie Come Home, a movie about a collie (as in the photo above), led to a 40% increase in collie registrations at the club. Even more dramatically, The Shaggy Dog, a 1959 movie with an Old English sheepdog as its star, doubled that breed’s registrations, the scientists report today in PLOS ONE. These days, though, movies’ influence has waned, perhaps, the researchers speculate, because of increased competition from television, the Internet, and movies themselves. Until 1940, movies with dog stars were released at a rate of less than one per year; these days, there are more than seven movies featuring dogs each year. The sudden surge in popularity hasn’t been good for the star breeds; those that became the “it” dog following their movie debuts were also overbred to meet the demand and through inbreeding have developed the greatest number of inherited disorders.For more on man’s best friend, see the Science News team’s latest coverage of doggy science.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

A new view of one of Hubble’s most famous images

first_imgSEATTLE, WASHINGTON—In honor of the 25th anniversary of the launch of the Hubble Space Telescope in April, astronomers have taken another snapshot of one of the images that made Hubble famous: the “Pillars of Creation” in the Eagle Nebula. “It’s a new image of an old friend,” said Paul Scowen of Arizona State University, Tempe, while presenting the images here this week at a meeting of the American Astronomical Society. “You can see how far Hubble has come in the past 25 years serving the astronomical community.” Hubble’s instruments have been upgraded since the original image was snapped 19 years ago, so astronomers are able to see more detail and gather more data than previously. The image shows a region of gas and dust where stars are being born, but much of the material is in the process of being blown away by ultraviolet light from massive young stars elsewhere in the nebula. At the top of each pillar is a denser region that is shadowing material below from light coming in from above, producing the pillar effect.last_img read more

The avid watchers of India’s old school travelling cinemas

first_imgRead it at BBC Related Itemslast_img

Demonetisation, GST disruptions to cool India’s GDP growth to 4-year low

first_imgRead it at Live Mint Related Itemslast_img

Middle East to welcome nine million Indian visitors by 2021

first_imgRead it at FTN Related Itemslast_img

Protests Planned in London Over Weekend

first_imgA protest is set to take place outside the Indian embassy in London over the weekend, as pressure on Sterlite and authorities in India and the U.K. mounts following the killing of at least 12 people in police firing in Thoothukudi over the past two days and the ruling by the Madras High Court to cease construction on Unit II of the plant.Read it at The Hindu Related Itemslast_img

Trapping Indian Students? Really Mr. Trump?

first_imgWho would have thought that with all the social problems bubbling up in Donald Trump’s America, the US government would spend its considerable talents and energy on trapping Indian students. Read it at Economic Times Related Itemslast_img

Western Gaze: Mementos Of The Heart

first_imgShen Seneca said, “Travel and change of place impart new vigor to the mind,” he wasn’t speaking of India. But he may as well have been.From a Westerner’s perspective, everything India offers is remarkable. India invites its guests, to a personal introduction to the culture, hospitality, sounds, delicious food and norms of daily life of over 1 billion people. But the emotional punch India carries is beyond words. At every street corner, a white-skinned visitor can quickly move through a vortex of feelings. Experiences such as these prove to be more valuable than any piece of trinkets, memorabilia or pictures one carries home.In advance of my first trip to India, I looked up web sites and consulted with Indian immigrants in the United States. But India turned out to be well beyond anything one could prepare for. Many cautioned me that the experience would forever change me, of which I was very skeptical. Hey, it is only a trip, right? How much could I change in the nine days I spent in the country with eight other students.It began soon after landing in Delhi. From the first minute after exiting the airplane to the last glimpse of the Mumbai soil as the plane lifted off the tarmac, India captured our senses in a way that the sights and sounds of the United States cannot quite match. We were filled with a new sense of curiosity with every passing moment. Each meal, each cab ride, each adventurous trip on a rickshaw, and every glance on the street was rich and varied. The culture and life was far too exciting and complex to be contained in words or pictures. Every moment was filled with surprises. After a while, everything strange became commonplace and that was the magic of being in India. JoLynne HollomanThe traffic patterns, if there were any, defied our perceptions of the rigidity of rules. The entire travel seemed exciting and dangerous, but incredibly wondrous all the same. The variety and the diversity in every pulse challenged the monotony of life we have come to know in America.In addition to the constant excitement that held a world of meaning in every moment, perhaps the most memorable was the kindness of the people we encountered. Coming from a culture with an emphasis upon the individual, it was refreshing to be met by friendly faces always willing to return a smile or a small nod of greeting. Although my Hindi skills didn’t improve in my short time there, I found myself holding small conversations with anyone who inquired, “English, no?” as I walked down the street. Never tiring of talking to someone new, I often found myself indulging details of how and why we were traveling to anyone who would listen. While the stories may have been a bit lost in translation, the glisten in the eyes of people I was speaking with told me that somehow, they knew exactly what I was saying. Who needs translation and language skills when you can connect with glances and gestures.The kindness and honest curiosity about our trip was most evident when interacting with people as we worked our cameras. We were absolutely adamant about filming and photographing nearly everything and everyone we came into contact with. Families were excited to pose for a picture at the temples on a warm March evening and an elderly man quickly struck a pose in front of the Matangeshwara Temple, displaying a prestige and authority that could not be staged. Many who became the subjects of our camera’s gaze were curious to see their images on our digital displays. They would either nod in approval or smile, begging for just one more photograph. Sometimes we became the photo subjects for the memory house of photographs for the natives.My trip to India, venturing from my suburban Philadelphia apartment was transformative. As with most trips, you return with postcards, trinkets, perhaps even sunburn, but this excursion was different from anything I have experienced in my 19 years. It provided an opportunity to completely remove myself from a society in which I had grown so comfortable. Our eyes were quickly ripped open to the reality that lavish lifestyles were no match for the true joy that comes from the relationships you create and the actions you take to better yourself, other people and the world around you.For an American used to hearing complaints of people who felt “impoverished” by their inability to afford the latest automobile, it was striking to see smiling faces in the midst of unimaginable poverty.I made sure to pack an extra bag for the souvenirs – it was India after all! But I know that notwithstanding the volume of mementos I brought home, they are no match for what I carry of India in my heart, my mind, and my life.   Related Itemslast_img read more

Gandhi Font

first_imgAn Indian ad agency has developed a Gandhiji font in the Devanagari script, based on Mahatma Gandhi’s spectacles with the aim of “allowing us to see the world through his eyes.” “The creation of these fonts is our way of celebrating the life and teachings of the Mahatma,” said KV Sridhar, national creative director at Leo Burnett.   Related Itemslast_img